New PM Articles for the Week of March 16 – 22

New project management articles published on the web during the week of March 16 – 22. And this week’s video: Harry Hall talks about the need to identify a risk owner along with the project risks you want to manage. 3 minutes, safe for work.

Ethics, Business Acumen and Strategy

  • Zorana Ivcevic and colleagues reports on results of a survey that found an alarming level of pressure to act unethically in US organizations. 5 minutes to read.
  • Ron Rivers examines the intersection of technology and labor, from early history to the near future. 13 minutes to read.
  • Adam Rasmi reports that COVID-19 is also impacting negotiations between the UK and EU on a post-Brexit free trade agreement. 2 minutes to read.

Managing Projects

  • Mike Clayton explains how to manage multiple projects at once. Video, 15 minutes, safe for work.
  • Marina Pilipenko tutors us on project cost management. 7 minutes to read.
  • Peter Landau coaches us on making a procurement management plan. Part of it is a commercial, but you also watch television, right? 6 minutes to read.
  • Jory MacKay guides us through writing a communication plan. 9 minutes to read.
  • Brad Egeland walks us through the process of handing a project off to another project manager. 4 minutes to read.
  • The nice folks at Clarizen compiled a list of five books that every project manager should read. 3 minutes to read.

Managing Software Development

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from what drives performance of a distributed agile team to disagreement in distributed teams to the magic of conflict. 7 outbound links, 3 minutes to read.
  • Kiron Bondale argues that domain and organizational knowledge are the key requirement for prospective product managers. 3 minutes to read.
  • Tanay Agrawal suggests that product managers need to see their product like a new user, every single day. 5 minutes to read.
  • Henny Portman shows the difference between incremental and iterative Here’s Part Two, about ten minutes to read both parts.
  • Ankur Jain explains a diagram of the DevOps life cycle. 2 minutes to read.
  • Maximilian Bauer says that being smarter about test cases and how they are structured can save money in testing. 7 minutes to read.

Applied Leadership

  • George Pitagorsky tells us how to manage fear and anger in projects. 5 minutes to read.
  • Christine Trodella has some thoughts on managing newly remote workers, when you don’t know how long they’ll be working from home. 7 minutes to read.
  • Sharlyn Lauby uses the Marvel Cinematic Universe to illustrate keys points on how to manage the external workforce, both project-based and recurring. 4 minutes to read, plus a video interview, 10 minutes, safe for work.
  • Amelia Salyers curates a list of 22 articles for leaders from the past few years, published by venture capital firm Andreeson Horowitz. 5 minutes to read the synopses.

Cybersecurity and Data Protection

  • Curtis Franklin gives us a brief overview of how to quantify cybersecurity risks. 4 minutes to read.
  • Brenda Sharton sees plentiful opportunities for cybercriminals in the new “work from home” mantra of COVID-19. 4 minutes to read.

Pot Pourri

  • Elizabeth Harrin gives us some useful pointers for setting up our home office. 4 minutes to read.
  • Stephanie Vozza notes that generalists tend to be more successful, but only if they get really good at a few useful skills that combine to make them stand out. 3 minutes to read.
  • Sarath C P shares six tips for creating an effective elevator pitch. 5 minutes to read. You’ll need to find your own elevator …

Enjoy!

A Good Stopping Point

Status

Dave GordonIn July of 2010, I published my first round-up of news, articles, blog posts, and other content of interest to project managers. I missed a couple of weeks over the last ten years, due to trans-Pacific travel and a relatively minor cerebrovascular event, but for the most part, I’ve kept up the weekly schedule. On March 29, 2020 I’ll publish the 500th weekly round-up. That seems like a good stopping point.

Without counting, I’ll estimate that I’ve linked to around 10,000 or so articles, podcasts, videos, blog posts, and so on. In a typical week, I read six for every one I link to, although it doesn’t seem like I read 60,000 articles. That’s a lot of content, and I offer a tip of the hat to all of the people who created it.

I finished my last consulting project at the end of January, 2018, and let my PMP expire by not renewing it in January, 2020. Maybe I should re-name the site The Retired IT Project Manager, but it quit being about me a long time ago. I’ll keep the site up, since there are also about 250 other posts on various topics that I wrote over the last ten years, as well as a couple of books and sample files still available for free download. Over the next few weeks, I’ll also upload new versions of  a few articles I wrote for other sites that are no longer available. If there’s sufficient interest, I’ll update and compile some of the stuff I’ve written over the last ten years that’s still relevant into one final book and make it available on Amazon, as I did with the data conversion book. “Selected Articles and Notes From a Curmudgeon” sounds like a good sub-title.

Speaking of books, I also want to finish writing the thriller I started working on a few years ago, about a road trip during a particularly scary flu epidemic. If it were already published, I might be enjoying better-than-expected sales. And another novel about the mystery of a jumbo jet that just … disappeared. The working title is, “The Sullenberger Maneuver.” And of course, I’ll spend more time turning perfectly good wood into sawdust, shavings, and chips in my garage workshop.

Thanks to everyone who ever hired or engaged me, managed me, taught me, worked with me, reported to me, listened to me, argued with me, read my stuff, commented, or thought about things that I brought up. Well, maybe not everyone. But almost everyone.

Peace be with you.

New PM Articles for the Week of March 9 – 15

New project management articles published on the web during the week of March 9 – 15. And this week’s video: Angela Ceberano talks about how she changed her view of the anxieties that used to paralyze her. “Be the warrior, not the worrier.” 11 minutes, mostly safe for work.

Ethics, Business Acumen and Strategy

  • Romesh Vaitilingham summarizes the results of a World Economic Forum survey of economists around the world, on the potential for a recession. 6 minutes to read.
  • John Detrixhe interviews Nobel prize winning economist Robert Schiller, who says that this economic disruption is different from past economic crises. 4 minutes to read.
  • Greg Satell examines the impact of automation since 1900 and suggests that work in the coming years will be based more on collaboration than on tasks. 5 minutes to read.

Managing Projects

  • Praveen Malik shares ten excellent getting-started tips for MS Project beginners. 5 minutes to read.
  • Chris walks through the keys steps in decommissioning the zombie servers in your data center. 5 minutes to read.
  • Stav Ziv shares her detailed Q and A crib sheet for preparing for that project manager job interview. 15 minutes to read.
  • Bruce Gordon describes the approach to develop the PMI Chicagoland project management mentoring program. 8 minutes to read.
  • Elizabeth Harrin provides some guidance for an experienced project manager managing an international project for the first time. 5 minutes to read.
  • Glen Alleman references WalMart in a case study of capabilities elicitation and capabilities-based planning. 3 minutes to read.

Managing Software Development

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from decision making under pressure to emerging organizational silos to team right-sizing. 7 outbound links, 3 minutes to read.
  • Johanna Rothman concludes and summarizes her series on building team resilience. 3 minutes to read.
  • Tom Cagely talks about using Clean Language concepts to refine requirements and gets a visit from Susan Parente, who talks about virtual agile. Podcast, 20 minutes, safe for work.
  • Kristin Jackvony tutors us on API contract testing. Clear, with a very low nerd content. 4 minutes to read.
  • Bjorn van den Einden tutors us on product backlog refinement. 7 minutes to read.
  • George Guimarães shares the agile and engineering metrics he uses with his teams to achieve continuous improvement. 4 minutes to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic tells us how to spot an incompetent leader. Arrogance is the first symptom. 5 minutes to read.
  • The Insightful Leader at Kellogg School of Management interviews Nicola Bianchi on what kinds of management training are the most effective. Podcast, 12 minutes, safe for work.
  • Nancy Settle-Murphy and Jesse Bibbee share a checklist for reacting to the decision that your upcoming face-to-face workshop must be virtual. 7 minutes to read.
  • Mike Clayton explores the origins, implications, and application of servant leadership. Video, 14 minutes, safe for work.

Cybersecurity and Data Protection

  • Michael Kan reports that Google researchers have found a design flaw in the Avast antivirus. 2 minutes to read.
  • Sadie Williamson tells us how to be supportive of the people who fell into cybersecurity traps. 6 minutes to read.
  • Robert Howell explains why we shouldn’t be allowed to waive our right to keep our information private. 4 minutes to read.

Pot Pourri

  • Stephanie Vozza summarizes the top three co-worker behaviors that annoy us, based on a survey, and suggests ways to minimize the impact on our psyches. 5 minutes to read.
  • Jason Cohen suggests a few steps we can take to improve the experience on our video conference calls. 4 minutes to read.
  • Ashley Wilson points out a few things happening in the office that negatively impact productivity, and ways to deal with them.

Enjoy!