New PM Articles for the Week of October 13 – 19

Balloon Over the WallNew project management articles published on the web during the week of October 13 – 19. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

PM Best Practices

  • Elizabeth Harrin defines two key terms – dependencies and constraints – and then provides guidelines on how to identify them.
  • Glen Alleman shares the notes from his recent presentation on using technical performance with earned value.
  • Michael Ipsaro argues that large procurements need to link acquisition life cycle management with a product team that can give them continuous feedback.
  • John Goodpasture takes his turn at debunking the #NoEstimates movement.
  • Donald Patti applies a different experience set to the often-quoted Standish Report project success rates.
  • William Forgrave gives us the executive summary of his new book, on applying lessons learned from the Monty Python films to project management.
  • Brad Egeland concludes his series on why project deadlines get missed, and how to get back on track.
  • Deb Krizmanich and Frank Erschen give us the short version of their white paper on a structured decision-making process.
  • Ron Rosenhead approves of the UK government’s plan for a national exercise of their ability to respond to Ebola, and asks how we’re testing our project roll-out?
  • Nick Pisano points out that Excel and Powerpoint are not good platforms for managing strategic data.
  • James Brown reminds us that no tool can be better than its content.

Agile Methods

  • Sondra Ashmore and Kristin Runyan continue their series summarizing the requirements chapter of their textbook, “Introduction to Agile Methods.”
  • Molood Noori Alavijeh recommends we write our user stories with the same values that fiction writers use in crafting their stories.
  • David Anderson begins a series on when Kanban is appropriate approach for a specific workflow.

Leadership

  • Bruce Benson recounts an anecdote that illustrates the power of knowing when to, “not fight it.”
  • Kevin Lonergan approaches risk management from a leadership perspective, to get the maximum participation from the team.
  • Rob Saxon summarizes several critical leadership habits and behaviors, as espoused by great historical leaders.
  • Mike Griffiths links worker retention and productivity with leadership and compassion.
  • Lynda Bourne summarizes the evolution of ethics and maps the PMI Code of Conduct to several historical belief systems.
  • Patti Gilchrist has assembled a “how-to” list for those who aspire to be bad managers. And for those who aspire to be good
  • Gina Abudi notes that the key to managing change is helping employees get past the obstacles to embracing that change.
  • Adriana Girdler enumerates a few things we should never do when managing organizational change.

Enjoy!