New PM Articles for the Week of November 3 – 9

Balloon Over the MoonNew project management articles published on the web during the week of November 3 – 9. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

PM Best Practices

  • Gary Nelson presents an interesting case study in cost-benefit analysis.
  • John Goodpasture offers low-cost definitions for a couple of ten-dollar words used by risk management thinkers – epistemic and aleatoric.
  • Matthew Squair offers an intriguing (if slightly nerdy, even for me) example of trading one risk for another.
  • Mike Clayton notes that power is fragmented across most organizations; thus, the need to influence.
  • Bruce Harpham exposes ten sources of project conflict, and a few statistics that put workplace conflict in perspective.
  • Andy Jordan reports from the PMI Global Congress in Phoenix. It sounds like we should plan to go to the one in Orlando, next October.

Agile Methods

  • Mike Cohn concludes his series on velocity-driven versus commitment-driven sprint planning, by explaining his preference.
  • Pawel Brodzinski explains the Kanban approach to portfolio management. “WIP limits … underscore available capabilities as a scarce resource.”
  • Chuck Snead makes the case for creating a project charter as part of Sprint Zero and walks us through the process.
  • Shawn Dickerson advocates for the marriage of Agile methods with a Waterfall approach.
  • Satyajit Sarangi shares some ideas for applying Lean concepts to your practice of Scrum.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Dave Cornelius on his new program, teaching high school students Agile methods as life skills. Just 12 minutes, safe for work.

 Book Reviews

  • Elizabeth Harrin reviews Thomas P. Wise’s new book, “Trust in Virtual Teams,” a guide to explaining and building trust … well, you get the idea.
  • Henny Portman reviews Rod Snowden’s book, “MSP Survival Guide for Business Change Managers,” where MSP = “Managing Successful Programmes.”
  • Michel Dion summarizes Susanne Madsen’s upcoming book, “The Power of Project Leadership.”
  • Toby Elwin reviews Warren Berger’s new book, “A more Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthough Ideas.”
  • Glen Alleman shares a list of books on estimating software projects.

Trends

  • Peter Saddington casts a dubious eye on “Recruiting 3.0” as described by Ron Thomas. The quality of user-generated content does not predict job performance.
  • Teena Hammond shares the results of a survey of IT decision makers, in an attempt to predict which of the emerging trends will actually matter.
  • Joe Panettieri reports on the relatively disappointing ROI of Big Data projects. Well, it took heavier-than-air flight a while to become commercially viable …
  • Jelani Harper explains the concept of “Data Lakes,” and why it might be a good fit for organizations with a disciplined approach to data governance.

Professional Development

  • Coert Visser reinforces the idea that coaching is not about the coach, and you don’t have to understand the subject matter in order to be an effective facilitator.
  • Suzanne Lucas summarizes results of a survey by recruiting software house iCIMS that confirms recruiters and hiring managers are not communicating very well.
  • Cheri Baker observes that, as small companies succeed and grow, many of the long-term employees grieve for their old culture.
  • Alina Vrabie suggests some strategies for the introverted leader.

Enjoy!