New PM Articles for the Week of April 25 – May 1

New project management articles published on the web during the week of April 25 – May 1. And this week’s video: Nixie Pixel explains how to install and use KeePass, my favorite every-platform password manager. Just over six minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Lynda Bourne expounds on the nature and sources of reputational risk and dealing with reputational risk events.
  • Cade Metz reports on the founding of OpenAI, the new firm founded by Elon musk and Sam Altman which will create transformative technology and then give it away.
  • Bertrand Duperrin shares his analysis of PWC’s 2016 Global CEO Survey. Key takeaway: business has to redefine success in order to be successful.

Established Methods

  • John Goodpasture: “Risk management does not set policy for the project office; it only sets the left and right-hand boundaries for the vision, or for the project policies.”
  • Laura Barnard explains why PMO success is driven more by building trust than by establishing repeatable processes.
  • Ryan Ogilvie lays out some strategies for what to do when your IT service improvement program stops improving – there are paths past the plateau.
  • Rich Maltzman notes project portfolio management lessons in Ken Burn’s documentary, “National Parks: America’s Best Idea,” and E.O. Wilson’s “Half Earth.”
  • Danie van den Berg makes the case for diagrams and visuals, and just drawing things during meetings.

Agile Methods

  • Lisette Sutherland interviews Johanna Rothman on organizing geographically distributed teams. Just 33 minutes, safe for work.
  • Bart Gerardi shows how and when to use a story point value of zero.
  • Vyom Bharagwaj describes two common estimating techniques: Wideband Delphi and Planning Poker.
  • The Clever PM begins a series on Product Management Fundamentals: Working with designers.
  • Alex DiPasquale outlines the importance of properly written acceptance criteria.
  • Dave Duggal notes that the proliferation of API’s, whether SOAP /WSDL or REST, is making every software app a collection of integration experiments.

Applied Leadership

  • Harry Hall tells how to manage that project team member who isn’t performing.
  • Art Petty speaks out on the “inner game of leading,” meaning the mental attitude that drives our behavior.
  • Tony, Renee, Craig, and Tyson interview David Marquet, author of “Turn the Ship Around!” Just 40 minutes, safe for work.
  • Elise Stevens interviews occupational psychologist Sharon De Mascia on developing a coaching approach in project management. Just 19 minutes, safe for work.
  • Shawn Quigley and Jon Quigley note the critical contribution of project management to the Learning Organization.
  • Bruce Harpham interviews Steve Ressler, founder of GovLoop, on becoming an effective leader.

Pot Pouri

  • Elizabeth Harrin reveals her recent reading, from the inspirational “Personal Best” to “The Social Project Manager,” to a travel guide and more.
  • Penelope Trunk notes that Generation Y is starting new businesses at a slower rate than Gen X. Entrepreneurship is being replaced with free-lancing.
  • Jeff Collins lists five skills that project managers should include in their resumes, preferably in describing their accomplishments.
  • Sara McCord identifies four behaviors that can derail your job search – even when you’re a perfect fit.
  • Alyse Kalish posts an infographic on various ways to make yourself fall asleep faster. Not listed, but my favorite technique: three-suit Spider Solitaire [yawn] …

Enjoy!

3 thoughts on “New PM Articles for the Week of April 25 – May 1

  1. Thanks for including my post in the round up, Dave. I enjoyed the link to Danie van de Berg’s piece on BA Times and thought it interesting that in an article about images there weren’t any relating to the topic! But it’s a good point to use more pictures and fewer words – definitely helps understanding in my view.

  2. Glad you liked it, Elizabeth. A stock image of a pocket full of colored pencils illustrating an article advocating use of a whiteboard is definitely a sign of clueless editing.

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