About Dave Gordon

Dave Gordon is a project manager with over twenty years of experience in implementing human capital management and payroll systems, including premises-based ERP solutions, like PeopleSoft and ADP Enterprise, and SaaS solutions, like Workday. He has an MS in IT with a concentration in project management, and a BS in Business. He also holds the project management professional (PMP) designation, as well as professional designations in human resources (GPHR and SPHR) and in benefits administration (CEBS). In addition to his articles and blog posts, he curates a weekly roundup of articles on project management, and he has authored or contributed to several books on project management.

New PM Articles for the Week of August 24 – 30

Crater LakeNew project management articles published on the web during the week of August 24 – 30. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Gary Lea raises the legal and ethical question: who is accountable when artificial intelligence does something harmful? This isn’t just a Dilbert story line!
  • Paul Pelletier addresses the proper response when you observe bullying in the workplace.
  • Art Petty explains the manager’s responsibilities when bullied by an employee.

Established Methods

  • Stilgherrian looks ahead, to when the Internet of Things has massive installations of unsupported code, security exploits abound, and the world is your data center.
  • John Goodpasture contemplates old court cases and dead horses, and finds verities amongst the balderdash.
  • Matthew Squair maintains that the mid-flight explosion of shuttle Challenger resulted from a failure of engineers to communicate the nature of the risk.
  • Allen Ruddock provides an example of the milestone leveling technique.
  • Harry Hall follows up on a recent article listing 40 reasons PMO’s fail, with ten risk strategies for preventing PMO failure.
  • Aaron Smith summarizes the key points of a recent Gartner Group report on ensuring the relevancy of the PMO.
  • Mike Girdler explains the difference between continuous improvement and innovation, and why one might be more important than the other for your organization.
  • Kevin Coleman uses the example of 3D printing to explore the need to continually evolve business strategy, in order to deal with what’s happening in the larger business environment.

Agile Methods

  • Mike Cohn examines an iterative approach that is still just waterfall in smaller chunks. Old habits die hard!
  • Johanna Rothman contrasts the different roles of the project portfolio management team and the product owner team.
  • Zoltan Csutoras advocates what he calls the “one piece flow” as a technique to reinvigorate the daily stand-up. Limiting work in progress can be the key to getting to done!
  • Damián Buonamico recommends a Kaizen board as a visual tool to correct the pathologies identified during retrospectives.

Work Isn’t a Place You Go

  • Patti Gilchrist addresses the growing demand that project managers be knowledgeable of a specific domain.
  • Bruce Harpham ties together several of his earlier posts on managing your career, with some insights into earning that next promotion.
  • Bruce Benson reflects on the choice of either training your own people or hiring new people with the needed skills.
  • Patricia Goh lists the reasons for actually using your vacation time.

Video Podcasts from Agile 2015

  • Dave Prior interviews Mike Vizdos and Michele Sliger at the Agile Alliance Video Podcast booth. Just 7 minutes, safe for work.
  • Dave Prior interviews Esther Darby. Just 23 minutes, safe for work.
  • Dave Prior interviews Scott Ambler on Agile Data Warehousing and Disciplined Agile Delivery. Just 29 minutes, safe for work.
  • Craig Smith and Renee Troughton join a round table of podcasters and other attendees. Just 40 minutes, safe for work.

 

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of August 17 – 23

Cape MearsNew project management articles published on the web during the week of August 17 – 23. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Ezra Klein analyzes last Sunday’s New York Times’ expose of the demands of white-collar life at Amazon, and finds the evidence less than compelling.
  • Suzanne Lucas counters the New York Times Amazon profile with her observation that many people are looking for exactly that sort of demanding, big-league career.
  • Sarah Greene Carmichael reviews the research: those long hours are counterproductive for both the employee and the company.

Established Methods

  • Glen Alleman on anecdotes and statistics: “An anecdote is a statistic with a sample size of one.”
  • Elizabeth Harrin describes “Advances in Project Management,” as edited by Darren Dalcher. Sort of a PM Reader’s Digest …
  • Kailash Awati summarizes Russell Ackoff’s type classification of managerial attitudes toward planning. And it’s not necessarily about dysfunction.
  • Coert Vissar reviews Richard Nisbett’s, “Mindware: Tools for Smart Thinking.”
  • Seth Godin notes that the first step in addressing a complex problem is agreeing on the definition of the problem and how it impacts us.
  • Robert T. reflects on the science supporting the value of intuitive decision-making.
  • Bruce Harpham collates eight habits of highly effective communicators.
  • Art Petty helps us overcome our fear of sharing feedback.
  • Harry Hall reviews the core principles and terminology of scope management.
  • Alex Lu-Pon profiles Adam Wright, who manages the construction of personal submarines, one boat at a time.

Agile Methods

  • Mike Griffiths looks into a problem with Agile methods: resistance to innovation and change, among some of the thought leaders!
  • Johanna Rothman follows up on her recent post, explaining how to use continuous planning.
  • Len Lagestee lists seven characteristics that sum up what an increasingly Agile organization should “feel like.”
  • Derek Huether has identified an amusing divergence: the Big Design Up Front of Agile2015 seems less valuable than informal gatherings, e.g. Emergent Design.

Work Isn’t a Place You Go But Something You Do

  • Thomas Carney gets the skinny on working remotely, from eleven project management thought leaders.
  • Patrick Gray shares some tips for the traveling IT worker, also known as the migrant computer worker, road hog, and so on …
  • A.W. also known as Gulliver the business traveler, trots out the unhealthy consequences of a life spent on the road. Now you tell me …
  • Tom Barnett looks at what should drive our decision to move on to the next opportunity.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Cesar Abeid interviews Errette Dunn on his journeys to become the Lean influence at Wrike. Just 53 minutes, safe for work.
  • Cornelius Fichtner continues his recent interview of Susanne Madsen, with a deeper dive into coaching techniques. Just 25 minutes, safe for work.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Dan Galorath on the fine art of estimating. Just 15 minutes, safe for work.

 

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of August 10 – 16

PortlandNew project management articles published on the web during the week of August 10 – 16. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Glen Alleman demonstrates how to estimate with minimal information, based on the question, “How many piano tuners are there in Chicago?”
  • Art Petty shares his thoughts on the courage needed to transform a business, whether it’s to avoid pending obsolescence or to take advantage of opportunities.
  • Bruce Harpham helps us develop our business acumen with some specific recommendations.

PM Best Practices

  • Suzanne Lucas lists the elements of being a manager that your employees will want to follow.
  • Elizabeth Harrin identifies seven reasons team members don’t take responsibility, and what you can do about it.
  • Margaret Meloni shares a letter from the project team to the PM, explaining their expectations. This is a companion to an earlier letter, from the PM to the team.
  • Thomas Carney reviews the issues, considerations, and challenges encountered by teams that work remotely.
  • Harry Hall provides a requirements management preparedness questionnaire.
  • Deanne Earle articulates the benefits of assessing a project in progress, to determine whether it should be continued or canceled.
  • Ryan Ogilvie gives us his insights on how to “do” incident management.
  • Matthew Squair has extensively re-written his 2009 post on epistemic, ontological, and aleatory risk. The best explanation of the continuum of uncertainty I’ve ever read.

Agile Methods

  • Patrick Mayfield, who comes from a Prince2 background, explains why Agile methods work better for today’s projects.
  • John Goodpasture gives us a brief update on the U.S. federal government’s efforts to embrace Agile methods.
  • Johanna Rothman tells a tale of two project teams, to illustrate the difference between adopting Agile rituals and exhibiting Agile behavior.
  • Mike Cohn alerts us to some new premium features on PlanningPoker.com.
  • Suman Bhownick explains the business logic behind the Agile principle of maximizing the amount of work not done.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Cesar Abeid interviews executive coach David Allen, author of “Getting Things Done,” now in the second edition. Just 44 minutes, safe for work.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Susanne Madsen on applying organizational change management techniques in our projects. Just 21 minutes, safe for work.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Chris Halloran on the fine art of estimating. “The most dangerous place to plan a project is from behind a computer screen.” Just 22 minutes, safe for work.

Outside the Lines

  • Jonathan Vanian points out the Big Data linchpin that the forthcoming Hewlett Packard Enterprise will hinge on.
  • Adam Shostack has started building a model of web browser security, which should probably be constructed from Antagonistic Legos.
  • Steven Levy recommends a product I hadn’t thought of: a charge-only USB cable for those public phone-charging stations. Malware at the airport? Whodathunkit?
  • Michael Smith describes his initial (positive) impressions of Workflowy, which he describes as half to-do list, half planning software.
  • Larry Alton reports on the growing number of small start-ups focused on natural language applications for AI. Someday, this weekly list will be curated by an app, and it won’t make any money, either.

Enjoy!