About Dave Gordon

Dave Gordon is a project manager with over twenty five years of experience in implementing human capital management and payroll systems, including SaaS solutions like Workday and premises-based ERP solutions like PeopleSoft and ADP Enterprise. He has an MS in IT with a concentration in project management, and a BS in Business. He also holds the project management professional (PMP) designation, as well as professional designations in human resources (GPHR and SPHR) and in benefits administration (CEBS). In addition to his articles and blog posts, he curates a weekly roundup of articles on project management, and he has authored or contributed to several books on project management.

New PM Articles for the Week of June 12 – 18

New project management articles published on the web during the week of June 12 – 18. And this week’s video: a compilation of the things project managers say, do, and otherwise share. Just over three minutes, and more or less safe for work.

Must read!

  • Rich Armstrong suggests that we should start developing an inclusive culture by working less and focusing on professionalism.
  • Adam Greenfield takes a (very) long look at the smartphone, which has completely transformed our society and social interactions in only ten years.
  • Brad Stulber and Steve Magness describe the positive effects derived from letting the brain rest, from insights to preventing burnout.

Established Methods

  • Alex Puscasu begins a 12-part series on risk management, with a description of project risk and a list of the articles to come.
  • Harry Hall offers some risk management metaphors from the beach.
  • John Goodpasture quickly summarizes “Algorithms to Live By: The computer science of human decisions,” by Brian Christian and Tom Griffiths.
  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews Linky ven der Merwe—just two of the most influential women in project management having a chat.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from the evolution of the Agile manager to the illusion of measuring what customers want, to when and how to say “no.”
  • Scott Sehlhorst explores four potential gains from Agile methods, requiring only lots of hard work.
  • Dave Prior interviews Parikshit Basrur on his Agile Transformation Playbook. Just 34 minutes, safe for work.
  • Ron Jeffries reflects on why we need a concept of “done” in Scrum, and why shorter sprints might help us learn to get everything done.
  • Mike Cohn helps us get ready for summer with a list of things to do before the Scrum master goes on vacation. Agile is about responding to changes, right?
  • Johanna Rothman continues her series on scaling Agile with an examination of Agile management, with a focus on flow efficiency.
  • The Clever PM looks at the contribution that accepting uncertainty makes to Agile teams.
  • Verena Frey points out the opportunity we get in a retrospective to reinforce the positive.
  • John Wood explains how to develop a user experience strategy.

Applied Leadership

  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy coaches us on how to fire people from our projects.
  • Art Petty extols the inspirational value of the highly competent.
  • Andy Kaufman interviews Andy Molinsky on his new book, “Reach,” and helping people step outside their comfort zones. Just 56 minutes, safe for work.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Seth Godin points out some recent revolutions that completely changed the human experience, and a couple of new ones already in progress.
  • John Yorke presents a short biography of Henry Ford, the man who first introduced what would become the Theory of Constraints, Lean, and workflow optimization to the workplace.
  • Grace Windsor shares some “pro tips” on preparing effective Powerpoint presentations.

Working and the Workplace

  • Madeleine Dore recaps the case for managing our energy, scheduling idle time, and preserving our focus.
  • Kat Boogaard lays out some strategies for getting the most out of the sleep you can get, if eight hours is out of the question.
  • Patrick Allen quotes Epictetus: “It is impossible for a man to learn what he thinks he already knows.”

Enjoy!

New Post at AITS: Simplicity

My latest article for AITS was published today: Simplicity: What’s Left When You Ignore Everything Else.

One of the great trends of the last decade has been the consumerization of virtually everything. You no longer have to know anything about the technology you are using to meet your needs. From retail self-service to manager dashboards to (soon) autonomous automobiles, our products are becoming ever less demanding of us, as we have become ever more demanding of them. And as project managers delivering those products to impatiently waiting end users, we have to understand the relationship between that expected simplicity and the hidden complexity in order to keep our projects within scope and on track.

As always, thanks for taking the time to read my stuff.

New PM Articles for the Week of June 5 – 11

New project management articles published on the web during the week of June 5 – 11. And this week’s video: Doug H. shows how to create a RACI chart in Excel, add validation and an error message, make each value display in a selected color, and improve the presentation with simple formatting. If you’ve struggled with Excel in these areas, this is an excellent demo. Just 11 minutes, safe for work.

Must read (or Hear)!

  • Lynda Bourne explains how to differentiate between normal, complex, and megaprojects and how to apply Traditional, Agile, Complex, and megaproject management methods.
  • James Clear explains why entropy drives complexity (as well as Murphy’s Law).
  • Matt Spence interviews Senator Kamala Harris, former Attorney General of the world’s sixth largest economy (California), on absorbing new technology into public policy. Just 27 minutes, safe for work.

Established Methods

  • Richard Bayney tutors us on creating a prioritized project portfolio, optimized using Efficient Frontier analysis.
  • Harry Hall analyzes the risk management processes for what they contribute to the bottom line: getting results.
  • Ryan Ogilvie recommends that you have a dialog with your customer about service to discover what they really want.
  • Alex Puscasu details best some best practices for outsourcing project work.
  • Elise Stevens interviews John Wyzalek on the fine points of engaging external stakeholders. Just over 20 minutes, safe for work.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of all things Agile, from Ron Jeffries on Dark Scrum and Corporate Agile, to an Agile historical timeline, to 12 principles for better experiments.
  • Johanna Rothman continues her series on “Scaling” Agile with part 4 and part 4a.
  • Dave Prior and Derek Huether discuss design on the Scrum team and Scrum Masters filling multiple roles. Just over 20 minutes, safe for work.
  • The Clever PM defends “ScrumBut” as a reasonable model if it works better for the organization than rigorously following the Scrum Guide.
  • Leigh Espy notes three easy Agile practices that you can adopt today (after due diligence, of course).
  • Garren Heye notes that resisting chaos is not about being inflexible or resisting change. Agility is not formlessness.
  • Mike Griffiths insists that retrospectives produce “lessons to be learned.”
  • Claire Karjalainen recaps a panel discussion on scaling design in the enterprise, including design leaders from SAP, GE Digital, Walmart, IBM, and HP Enterprise.

Applied Leadership

  • Art Petty tells us to beware of the leader who demands loyalty.
  • Suzanne Lucas tells of a junior analyst who followed the instructions for setting up her development workstation and deleted the production database. And got fired?
  • Seth Godin: “We always have a choice, but often, it’s a good idea to act as if we don’t.”

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Paramita Ghosh explains the best practices for extracting business value from machine learning.
  • Adam Shostack applies threat modeling techniques to a dockless bike sharing system available in China which is suffering from cheating customers.
  • Rob England advocates killing the Change Advisory Board. Or at least removing permission for every strap-hanger to object without taking responsibility for improvement.

Working and the Workplace

  • Conner Forrest highlights findings from a new report that indicates “fear of losing my job to artificial intelligence” is the number 1 cause of stress at work for Gen X and Millennials.
  • Daniel Lobo rails against the social pressure to be “Available” on instant messaging, which he refers to as “green dot syndrome.”
  • Richard Moy shows us how to kick-start a productive day without doing real any work—just clean your desk. It positively influences your mental energy level.

Enjoy!