New PM Articles for the Week of January 11 – 17

New project management articles published on the web during the week of January 11 – 17. This week’s favorite video: what happens when you reply to Spam – thanks, Garry, for the link! Recommended:

Must read!

  • Jeff Hawkins and Donna Lubinsky (remember the Palm Pilot and Treo?) explain the nuances of different approaches to machine intelligence and learning.
  • Bernard Marr introduces us to the future of short-range, wireless networking technology. Called LiFi, it’s essentially an LED that can transmit 224 GB per second. The mind boggles …
  • Coert Visser summarizes three phenomena which have ramifications for self-assessment: the Dunning-Kruger effect, the curse of knowledge, and the raised bar.

Established Methods

  • Brad Rach explains the bus rule: “Being a good project manager means I could get hit by a bus tomorrow and no one would notice.”
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Risk Doctor David Hillson on his presentation, “Weight Loss for Risky Projects.” Just 17 minutes, safe for work.
  • Harry Hall lists the topics to include in a risk management plan.
  • Emily Sue Tomac shows us two lists: then ten most frequently researched project management tools on TrustRadius, and the ten top rated. Note the lack of correlation.
  • John Goodpasture draws our attention to John Higbee’s “Program Success Probability Summary,” a colorful dashboard with trend indicators. Mental wheels are turning …
  • Elizabeth Harrin starts her new series, Inspiring Women in Project Management, by interviewing Caroline Crewe-Read. Stonehenge – seriously?!?
  • Cesar Abeid interviews Adam Nesrallah, a former spy, on applying intelligence gathering skills to communication. Just 39 minutes, safe for work.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Andrew Pearce on establishing and maintaining engagement with your stakeholders. Just 21 minutes, safe for work.
  • Nick Pisano continues his ruminations on materiality and prescriptiveness, as they apply to contractual relationships.

Agile Methods

  • Bob Tarne summarizes the concepts of divergence and convergence (as they apply to generating and selecting ideas) from Tim Brown’s “Change by Design.”
  • Neil Killick explains why MYOB plans to hire full-time Agile coaches in Melbourne, Sydney, and Auckland, and how they plan to leverage them.
  • Henny Portman shares his Prince2 Agilometer, an interesting tool for assessing the balance between structure and agility.
  • Craig Smith interviews Tom and Mary Poppendieck on Agile, Lean, rapid feedback, culture, and leadership. Just 43 minutes, safe for work.
  • The Clever PM tells how to get organizational alignment with the product road map.

Applied Leadership

  • Art Petty has begun a new series, called the manager’s guide to understanding strategy. This looks very good, even by Art’s standards.
  • Johanna Rothman concludes her series on how to leverage certifications in the hiring process without drowning out the more important stuff.
  • Suzanne Lucas gets us up to speed on a new trend in recruiting: No Resumes. Candidates are assessed on the quality of what they produce when given an assignment.
  • Colin Ellis explores the balancing act between leadership, organizational cultural, and project management methods.
  • James Clear explains how to cure Akrasia (what the ancient Greeks called procrastination).

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of November 30 – December 6

Balloon SunriseNew project management articles published on the web during the week of November 30 – December 6. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Patti Gilchrist recommends reducing the cost of poor quality with a risk-based testing strategy. And like most good project strategies, it starts at the beginning.
  • Art Petty encourages us to become more discriminating consumers of leadership content – getting away from the “happy talk” and digging into the dirty details.
  • Susanne Madsen details an approach for “up-skilling” an organization’s project managers.

Established Methods

  • Jeff Collins lists his top ten project management thought leaders to follow in 2016.
  • Justin Stoltzfus identifies trends in business intelligence and data analysis for 2016.
  • Todd Williams builds on an earlier post, on avoiding litigation when managing a project on behalf of a customer.
  • Nick Pisano continues his series on a general theory of project management, based on research into complex adaptive systems.
  • Elizabeth Harrin details “most effective practices” in business requirements management.
  • Harry Hall checklists the questions new team members need to have answered.
  • Gina Abudi identifies three challenges uncovered in a survey of managers who lead virtual teams, and strategies to handle them.
  • Martin Coomber demonstrates a few Visio process modeling productivity hacks.

Agile Methods

  • Glen Alleman notes that Agile at scale, in software-intensive systems-of-systems, is a very different Agile from five to eight developers in a room together.
  • Madhavi Ledalla expounds on release planning and release management – two critical techniques for delivering working software in iterations.
  • Esther Derby suggests that the team needs to understand what the product does, from the user’s point of view.
  • Mike Cohn provides an example of how to use a zero-point estimate on a user story.
  • Johanna Rothman starts a series on applying Agile methods to hardware development projects.
  • Reuben Salisbury gives us five reasons why a physical Scrum board beats the one you can access from anywhere, on a variety of devices.

Applied Leadership

  • Eric Johnson provides an executive-level bit of advice: be quick to listen and slow to react.
  • Bruce Harpham summarizes key lessons from “The Truth About Employee Engagement,” by Patrick Lencioni.
  • Colin Ellis identifies five “types” of project managers, based on their observable behaviors.
  • Bertrand Duperrin says that humans must learn to work with robots – not because humans will be replaced, but because collaboration has more potential.
  • Seth Godin notes that it isn’t economically viable (or even possible) to please some percentage of your customers.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Richard Larson on his PMI Global Congress presentation, “Entrepreneurial Business Analysis Practitioner.” Just 17 minutes, safe for work.
  • Jesse Fewell shares a rant: why would you even want to go Agile? It shouldn’t just be “fear of missing out;” you should be seeking transformation. Just five minutes, safe for work.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Marie Longworth on managing remote vendors. Just 18 minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!

New Post at AITS: The Project Dangers of Misusing RAID

AITSBloggingAllianceAnother of my posts at AITS has been published: The Project Dangers of Misusing RAID. In this case, RAID refers not to the bug spray, but to compilations of risks, assumptions, issues, and decisions in Excel templates. While managing each of them is critical to project success, it is important to understand the relationships among them – you can’t effectively manage them in isolation.

Thanks again for taking the time to read my stuff. If you have any comments on this particular article, please leave a comment at AITS. If you want to suggest future topics, please leave a comment below.