New PM Articles for the Week of May 2 – 8

New project management articles published on the web during the week of May 2 – 8. And this week’s video: a TED Talk interview with Linus Torvald, the man behind Linux and Git, who explains, “I am not a visionary, I’m an engineer.” Just 22 minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Elizabeth Harrin shares a video of her Imposter Syndrome presentation at PMI Synergy. Just 16 minutes long, safe for work.
  • Susanne Madsen begins a series on balancing positive and negative stress with the relationship between job pressure and job performance. There is an optimum level of stress!
  • Kevin Coleman describes the principles of managing what is being called a hybrid project, mixing Agile and Traditional methods.

Established Methods

  • Dimitriy Nizhebetskiy gets us back to the basics on the Work Breakdown Structure.
  • Bart Gerardi shares five techniques for earning and keeping the trust of your project team, stakeholders, and sponsors.
  • Margaret Meloni posts an infographic that describes the four basic components of quality management.
  • Kailash Awati applies Oliver Williamson’s economics research in order to identify the hidden costs to IT outsourcing. Just 5 minutes, safe for work.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Barbara Trautlein, who explains how to be a confident change leader. Just 24 minutes, safe for work.
  • Shuba Kathikeyan profiles twenty notable project management professors from around the globe. If you’re looking for an academic program, this could be very useful.
  • Harry Hall lists twelve questions that will help you diagnose the effectiveness of your project risk management activities.
  • John Goodpasture explains the basics of fault and root cause analysis.

Agile Methods

  • Mike Cohn explains how triangulation can prevent your story point estimates from escalating over time.
  • Johanna Rothman proposes a minimalist working definition of Agile.
  • Lynda Bourne looks at the maturing of Agile, as “the ridiculous excesses promoted by consultants and experts” fade into obscurity and pragmatism takes hold.
  • Pawel Brodzinski shows how Real Options helps achieve commitment from decision makers at the portfolio level to implementers at the feature level, in return for autonomy.
  • Peter Saddington shares an infographic that tells you everything you need to understand about the user experience.

Applied Leadership

  • Moira Alexander points out the most common challenges in software project (and portfolio) management these days.
  • Liane Davey recommends, “When faced with emotion at work, focus on the issue, not the emotion.”
  • Nancy Settle-Murphy outlines Radical Civility, which she defines as, “A kind of personal armor that can help repel the damaging effects of rude behavior.”

Virtual Teams

  • Lisette Sutherland explains how to discover the culture on your virtual team. Just 8 minutes, safe for work.
  • Danielle Koehler continues her series with HR expert Gail Rolls with a Q&A on managing remote workers.
  • Suzanne Lucas reports that the single most important thing needed for a productive team is psychological safety – the way the team interacts.
  • Hubstaff has a nice infographic on how to run a remote meeting. Since I lead such meetings several times a day, I can say: well done!
  • Michael Girdler provides a few tips on how to work from home effectively and efficiently.
  • Abby Wolfe presents the counter-point: working from home is over-rated.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of April 4 – 10

New project management articles published on the web during the week of April 4 – 10. And this week’s video: the first stage of the SpaceX Falcon 9 successfully lands on a recovery ship.

Must read!

  • Elizabeth Harrin walks us through her checklist for taking over a project already in flight.
  • Rich Maltzman reports on a project in Colorado that is taking food waste out of the land fill and converting it to energy, compost, and liquid fertilizer, by emulating digestion.
  • Harry Hall recaps each of the risk response strategies for positive and negative risks.

Established Methods

  • Anna Krachey, Nicole Nagel, and Jonathan Lewis extol the virtues of designing in a “War room,” a la Dr. Strangelove.
  • John Goodpasture sticks tongue in cheek to examine our evolving attitude toward failure.
  • Angela Wick looks at two sources of project pressure: tight timelines and a pre-determined solution.
  • Tejasvi Addagada explores ways to integrate risk management principles with data governance.
  • Colin Ellis debunks the notion of “best practices” in project management.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Naomi Caietti on managing stakeholder expectations. Just 15 minutes, safe for work.
  • Bruce Benson on automation: “Every key piece of management and decision-making software I ever developed and used was first a manual process that I personally did.”
  • Glen Alleman copies us on his systems engineering reference book list.

Agile Methods

  • Dave Prior interviews the coolest man in the Agile community – Woody Zuill – on mob programming. Almost an hour, safe for work.
  • Johanna Rothman explores some Agile solutions for geographically distributed teams.
  • Mike Cohn has some recommendations for the Sprint summary document, from content to audience.
  • Nick Schaden answers the question, “How do you structure your design team?”
  • Shalu Tyagi recounts how selected Agile methods were implemented for business functions with a regular operating rhythm: HR, administration, and so on.
  • Craig Smith and Tony Ponton conduct random vox pop interviews at Agile Australia. Just 31 minutes, safe for work.

Applied Leadership

  • Suzanne Lucas makes the case for emotional intelligence being more useful than a high IQ.
  • Alfred Stallion outlines the steps to take in improving your public speaking skills.
  • Michael Girdler reviews some basic approaches for overcoming resistance to change.
  • Eduardo Binda Zane, author of “Effective Decision Making,” looks at applying creativity in business and tells us that brainstorming is overrated.
  • Seth Godin reminds us that we are more powerful than we realize.
  • Adam Shostack explains why the information security slogan, “Think like an attacker,” isn’t actionable.
  • David Barrett interviews Roy Osing, author of “Be Different or Be Dead,” on strategic planning. Just 40 minutes, safe for work.
  • Jeff Collins recommends his five favorite project management podcasts.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of March 28 – April 3

New project management articles published on the web during the week of March 28 – April 3. And this week’s video: Coert Vissar diagrams the difference in motivation between our autonomous choices and those choices made for us. Complete with a slide guitar soundtrack; two minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Johanna Rothman’s new book, “Agile and Lean Program Management,” is now available.
  • Harry Hall shares three brief videos on making and executing better decisions.
  • Nancy Settle-Murphy explains how to get a conversation going by asking the right questions. If you spend much of your working day on conference calls, be sure to read this!

Established Methods

  • Laura Barnard applies some lessons on stakeholder management learned from Fred Rogers.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Julie Goff on managing a team of project managers. Just 16 minutes, safe for work.
  • Elizabeth Harrin shares her recent reading list. What does work-life balance look like? Well, start here.
  • Klaus Nielsen applies lessons from Daniel Kahneman’s book, “Thinking: Fast and Slow” to project management.
  • Dave Wakeman articulates the five steps in putting a new process in place.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Joe Drammissi on Enlightened Project Management. Just 33 minutes, safe for work.
  • Nick Pisoni explains the difference between measuring progress against plan (earned value) and progress during development (technical performance).
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy gets us back to basics in describing what to include in a project plan.
  • Glen Alleman adapts Jon Stewart’s final rant on “The Daily Show” to direct it toward his favorite target, the #NoEstimates movement.

Agile Methods

  • Mishkin Berteig lays out the four principles of refactoring. Sometimes, good software engineering can be a metaphor for life.
  • John Goodpasture introduces the notion of coupling to a discussion of architecture in an Agile approach.
  • The Clever PM (possibly) concludes his series, “Why Agile isn’t working for me.” This time, the focus is on individual actions.
  • Jake Bartlett points out some of the reasons Agile is hard to adopt.

Applied Leadership

  • Kathleen O’Connor interviews Ray Zinn, who founded and led semiconductor manufacturer Micrel for 37 years, on key lessons from his new book, “Tough Things First.”
  • Liane Davey shares a simple exercise that exposes each participant’s default reaction to change.
  • Peter Saddington shares a great infographic: 18 Things Mentally Strong People Do.
  • Scott Berkun uses the history of the Eiffel Tower to illustrate what it takes to drive real innovation and see it produce real change.
  • Eileen Burton says that great leaders are those who step up in a crisis.

Pot Pouri

  • Suzanne Lucas says that recruiters are good at spotting lies. Here are a few things that you really don’t need to lie about.
  • Jamie Hale gives us science-based recommendations on how to study. Key point: we best remember that which we best understand.
  • Steve Johnson identifies four “areas of expertise” that should drive what is (and isn’t) required in a job candidate.
  • Paul Sawyers opines on the market viability of an internet of consumer product things. Who needs a smart oven in the microwave society?

Enjoy!