New PM Articles for the Week of April 2 – 8

New project management articles published on the web during the week of April 2 – 8. And this week’s video: Bones and a full reconstruction of the largest pterosaur (flying dinosaur) ever found are now on display at the Altmuehltal Dinosaur Museum, in a suburb of Stuttgart, Germany. Hey, even if you are tired of Jurassic Park sequels, this is cool!

Must read!

  • Greg Satell explains how General Electric got disrupted—by getting better and better at delivering things their customers needed less and less. 5 minutes to read.
  • Tim Fernholz notes the huge difference between getting good at mass production (Tesla) and getting reliable at reusability (SpaceX). Transitioning to production can be the biggest business risk of all. 5 minutes to read.
  • Graham Kenny clarifies the relationships between objectives, strategies, and actions. 4 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin provides the questions you need to ask about GDPR implications before starting a new project. 8 minutes to read.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy points out the ways in which software development projects are managed differently from other types of projects. 4 minutes to read.
  • Karin Hurt shares the INSPIRE model for project management accountability conversations. 4 minutes to read.
  • Mike Clayton tutors us on project procurement management, as described in the PMBOK and practiced in the public and private sector. 10 minutes to read.
  • Jigs Gaton begins a series on creating custom reports in Microsoft Project, beginning with changes to a delivered report. 7 minutes to read.
  • The folks at Redbooth explain how to conduct a project pre-mortem and post-mortem. And your project doesn’t even have to be dead! 6 minutes to read.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from the Scrum master end game to the way Scrum and DevOps fit together to the cost of decision making. 2 minutes to read, 5 outbound links.
  • Johanna Rothman makes a distinction between being data-driven and data-informed. Good decision makers should note the difference. 2 minutes to read.
  • Cassandra Leung points out the problems with limiting work in progress (WIP) with creative work—in her example, writing. But it has other applications. 6 minutes to read.
  • Renee Troughton provides a decision tree on when to move to a different format for retrospectives. 2 minutes to read.
  • Luis Goncalves makes his recommendation for an Agile retrospective format, based on Esther Derby and Diana Larsen’s book on the subject. 7 minutes to read.
  • Kent McDonald posts an overview of Liftoff: Start and sustain successful agile teams, by Ainsley Nies and Diana Larsen. Just over a minute to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Alexander Maasik curates his weekly list of project leadership articles, from statistics to servant leadership to expressing your team’s feelings. 3 minutes to read, 5 outbound links.
  • Adam Grant interviews Daniel Coyle, author of The Culture Code: The secrets of highly successful groups. He says that trust is built in a way you wouldn’t expect. 4 minutes to read.
  • Sam begins a series on the way we define “purpose” to achieve alignment within the organization. Part 2 expands that to the customer. Each around 2 minutes.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Rich Rogers explores two testing cultures: testing as an adaptive investigation and testing as a factory process, or confirmation culture. 6 minutes to read.
  • Simon Schrijver does a deep dive into the details of pair testing. 7 minutes to read.
  • Paul Seaman talks about alternatives to the “given, when, then” acceptance criteria format, specifically conditions of satisfaction. 4 minutes to read.
  • Thomas Redman notes that machine learning tools are only as valuable as the quality of your data. Garbage in, algorithmic garbage out. 5 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Eric Torrence examines the ways that Detail-oriented People and Big-picture People need to communicate with each other. 4 minutes to read.
  • Farah Mohammed tries to answer the rhetorical question: What makes a company worth working for? 3 minutes to read.
  • Karen Bridges reviews research linking sleep deprivation to reduced productivity and health problems and then suggests some positive sleep habits. 5 minutes to read.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of March 26 – April 1

New project management articles published on the web during the week of March 26 – April 1. And this week’s video: Seth Godin suggests that we can benefit from thinking backwards—flipping the point of view on which our assumptions are based. 19 minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Christian Stewart notes some significant data privacy concerns for this of us who use Google’s services and products. 5 minutes to read. Nervous yet?
  • Todd Haselton tells how to download a copy of everything Google knows about you. 3 minutes to read, much longer to download. And if this doesn’t creep you out:
  • A 2016 memo by Facebook VP Andrew Bosworth acknowledges that the company’s relentless pursuit of growth via data collection could get people killed. Ethics matter, even when you’re popular. 8 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • Kailash Awati provides a very detailed tutorial on using a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate a distribution of probable completion times, using a simple project with four tasks and three-point estimates. 20 minutes to read, but well worth it.
  • John Goodpasture extracts some key principles from Nate Silver’s book, The Signal and the Noise: why so many predictions fail – and some don’t. 2 minutes to read.
  • Elizabeth Harrin reviews SaaS project resource management TeamDeck. 5 minutes to read.
  • Katrine Kavli gives us a crib sheet on test plans, useful for everyone from project managers to end users recruited for UAT. With templates! 2 minutes to read.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy explains how (and why) to create your own project management templates, rather than download one from some PM site. 4 minutes to read.
  • Brian Anthony O’Malley recommends a few ways to make your status reports more effective in a way that promotes your personal brand. 5 minutes to read.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from agile ecology to scaling with Lean and DevOps to problematic management principles. 3 minutes to read, 7 outbound links.
  • Brendan Connolly expands on Test Driven Development to provide an entry point for testers to perform their QA—start with objectives. 4 minutes to read.
  • Joe Colantonio interviews Michael Bolton on rapid software testing. Podcast, 38 minutes, safe for work.
  • Gojko Adzic notes that as more SaaS applications run in complex combinations, we will need to do more testing in the production environment. 7 minutes to read.
  • Pete Houghton explains how he found a bug—not by testing conformance to specifications, but by testing conformance to expectations. 2 minutes to read.
  • Martin Fowler announces the second edition of “Refactoring.” 7 minutes to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Alexander Maasik curates his weekly list of leadership articles, from the importance of self-improvement to improving your KPI’s to the difference between marketing, advertising, and branding. 3 minutes to read.
  • Mike Clayton points out the top priorities for project leaders, using the acronym LEAD. 10 minutes to read.
  • Marcia Reynolds explains the difference between convincing and influencing. 4 minutes to read.
  • Kiron Bondale notes that psychological safety must be cultivated one person at a time.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Daniel Bourke notes that we may have already invented artificial general intelligence. Maybe we just haven’t noticed. 5 minutes to read.
  • David Nield shares eleven tell-tale signs your accounts and devices have been hacked. 8 minutes to read.
  • Dan Kopf charts the history of the scatter plot (OK, that was nerd humor—so sue me). 3 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • John Yorke philosophizes on feedback—one can be the beneficiary of feedback or the victim. 5 minutes to read.
  • Francisco Saez explains why you need a daily action plan to let you focus on what’s important. 3 minutes to read.
  • Laura Guillen reports on recent research that casts serious doubt on the existence of a “confidence gap” between men and women. 5 minutes to read.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of March 5 – 11

New project management articles published on the web during the week of March 5 – 11. Daylight Savings Time began in North America today, March 11 but won’t begin until March 25 in the UK and most of Europe. And this week’s video: Chris Pond shows how to generate reports from Microsoft Project. 3 minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Schaun Wheeler: “Most ethical mistakes come from the inability to foresee consequences, not the inability to tell right from wrong.” 8 minutes to read.
  • Bill Taylor notes the passing of Roger Bannister, who ran the mile in under four minutes by ignoring conventional wisdom. There’s a lesson here for those who would lead change. 4 minutes to read.
  • Ephrat Livni interviews futurist Richard Watson on how to be better informed—start by avoiding the news. Television journalism is to journalism as television personality is to personality. 3 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin extracts actionable ideas from 15 women in project management that she’s interviewed over the years. 8 minutes to read, with links to each of the interviews and the LinkedIn profiles of each project manager.
  • Mike Clayton offers a primer in change management for project managers. 6 minutes to read.
  • Doug Thorpe revisits David Gleicher’s 1960’s era model for resistance to change. 4 minutes to read.
  • Guilherme Caloba shares an approach to integrating qualitative and quantitative risk analyses. 6 minutes to read.
  • Sai Prasad shows how to display the MS Project timeline as a countdown, in under a minute.
  • Brad Egeland walks us through the steps to replace the project manager n a failed project. 5 minutes to read.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from the Agile Fluency model to why projects are always late to choosing your battles. 2 minutes to scan, 7 outbound links.
  • John Yorke contemplates the notion of delivering value in two posts, the second one applying Eli Goldratt’s observations on how measurement influences behavior. 10 minutes to read both.
  • Johanna Rothman notes that traditional measurements focus on resource efficiency rather than flow efficiency. There are better alternatives. 5 minutes to read.
  • Michael Stahl offers some “test cases” for the practical application of ethics in software testing. 7 minutes to read.
  • The Clever PM refines our approach to retrospectives as a key component of continuous improvement.
  • Kiron Bondale asks the rhetorical question: shouldn’t we all be agile project managers? Just over a minute to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Henny Portman reviews Tribal Unity: Getting from Teams to Tribes by creating a one team culture. 2 minutes to read.
  • Bruce Benson reflects on how poor management practices often start at the top. 3 minutes to read.
  • Deborah Riegel tells us how to solicit negative feedback when your manager doesn’t want to give it. Lessons here for managers, too. 4 minutes to read.
  • Cory Foy presents a purpose-based strategy alignment model. 3 minutes to read.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Hanan Benold explains how to communicate technical debt to non-technical decision makers. 4 minutes to read.
  • Michael Solomon tells how to manage penetration testing like a project (which it is). 5 minutes to read.
  • Paramita Ghosh notes the evolving use cases for the Internet of Things. 5 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Leigh Espy shares a simple technique to help deal with nervousness before and during a presentation. 5 minutes to read.
  • Gina Abudi catalogs some of the challenges in managing remote workers. 2 minutes to read.
  • Mike Vardy interviews Dr. Mary Lamia on her new book, What Motivates Getting Things Done. And she never heard of David Allen’s book before writing it! Podcast, 26 minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!