New PM Articles for the Week of May 16 – 22

New project management articles published on the web during the week of May 16 – 22. And this week’s video: a tutorial on how to create mind maps using iMindMap.

Must read!

  • Mike Griffiths has updated his analysis: “Agile and PMBOK v5 Guide Alignment.” Just 36 pages, invaluable, and free to download in PDF format.
  • Coert Vissar provides brief definitions of 23 common cognitive biases, heuristics, and effects. Understanding these concepts will help you make better decisions.
  • Adriana Girdler walks us through her meeting facilitator toolbox. OK, it’s a rolling suitcase – the contents and how she uses them are what matters. Just 7 minutes, safe for work.

Established Methods

  • Henny Portman reviews Jim Johnson’s new book, “The Dead Presidents’ Guide to Project Management.”
  • Elise Stevens interviews Laura Barnard and Kendall Lott about the Project Management Day of Service and volunteering PM skills to non-profits. Just 29 minutes, safe for work.
  • Gina Abudi points out that supporting employees’ social good work often benefits the employer.
  • Daan Pepijn explains how startups and small and medium enterprises can incorporate freelancers into their teams by leveraging technology.
  • Lisette Sutherland does a retrospective and lists some of the reasons her interview subjects have decided to embrace remote work. Just nine minutes, safe for work.
  • John Goodpasture examines an interesting concept in a presentation by SalKahn: the “project balance sheet.”
  • Nick Pisano advocates using analytics and a bit of self-awareness to remove the blind spots that keep organizations from acting in their own self-interest.
  • Sven Krasser and Dmitri Alperovitch clarify how machine learning can be applied to identifying and fighting off network attacks.
  • Bruce Harpham dusts off a few more techniques to make Email work for you.

Agile Methods

  • Frode Helgesen provides a quick overview of Pointing Poker, useful for geographically distributed teams who wish they could use planning poker.
  • Ryan Ripley interviews Johanna Rothman on her new book, “Agile and Lean Program Management.” Just 48 minutes, safe for work.
  • Jay Daniel makes the case for estimating our work, even when using Agile methods.
  • Mike Cohn argues against estimating the Sprint backlog using task points, rather than hours.
  • Peter Saddington has determined that a limited understanding of client organizational culture limits the effectiveness of Agile coaches and consultants.
  • Renee, Craig, and Tony interview Dean Leffingwell, the creator of the Scaled Agile Framework. Just 31 minutes, safe for work.
  • Mike Donoghue lays out the logic behind combining Agile and traditional project management methods into a hybrid approach.
  • Lavinia Mihaela Dinca identifies five challenges for the business analyst on a hybrid project.
  • The Clever PM notes that organizations adopt Scrum because they want results, not compliance with a methodology.

Applied Leadership

  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews Christine Unterhitzenberger, who is researching the degree to which perceptions of fairness impact project performance.
  • Peter Doyle links Jonathan Westrup’s Ethics, Values, and Governance Pyramid with the model of authentic project leadership described in “Organizational Dynamics.”
  • Art Petty adds his insights on how to coach employees struggling with self-doubt.
  • Moira Alexander illustrates the use of KPI’s to measure a project team’s effectiveness.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of March 7 – 13

New project management articles published on the web during the week of March 7 – 13. And this week’s video: David Letterman’s classic photo-identification quiz, “Trump or Monkey?” Four minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Mike Griffiths expounds on whether certification should indicate a ceiling or a floor of professional learning, and illustrates his point with historical examples.
  • Seth Godin explains the difference between confidence and arrogance, when making the case for change.
  • Lynda Bourne continues her examination of Practical Ethics. “The ethical standards of an organization are set by the actionsof its leaders.”

Established Methods

  • Samad Aidane interviews Suzie Blaszkiewicz, market analyst at GetApp, on their new report: 2016’s Top Project Management Apps.
  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews CEO, project manager, and entrepreneur Monica Borrell.
  • Douglas Brown on making process changes stick: “Best practices are a destination, not a starting point.”
  • Susanne Madsen explains the importance of positive relationships with project stakeholders, and how to develop them.
  • Brad Egeland offers five ideas for making meetings more productive that probably run counter to other advice you’ve seen.
  • Harry Hall explains the difference between qualitative and quantitative risk analysis, and offers suggestions on how to improve your approach.

Agile Methods

  • Neil Killick looks for a patch of common ground between #Estimates and #NoEstimates.
  • Glen Alleman responds to Neil on that common ground between #Estimates and #NoEstimates.
  • Johanna Rothman posted a four-part series on how Agile approaches influence the way we test, from our expectations to our practices to metrics. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4.
  • Mike Cohn recommends some alternatives approaches when developing reports that are too complex to deliver in one sprint.
  • Fernando Paloma Garcia explains how to stabilize quality and prepare to evolve the features of legacy applications by establishing a base of automated tests.
  • Shashank Sinha describes an example of how Agile methods were applied to the evolution of an enterprise legacy system.

Applied Leadership

  • Art Petty notes that good managers focus on what the people are doing, not just the tasks.
  • John Goodpasture considers un-delegation, based on the Principle of Subsidiarity.
  • Nancy Settle-Murphy addresses three questions from her Wall Street Journal interview, on dealing with issues between the remote worker and a problematic boss.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy explains how to develop a project management dream team.
  • Lisa Earle McLeod extols the virtues of Essentialism, “the disciplined pursuit of Less.”

Pot Pouri

  • Bruce Harpham offers some guidance for making remote work productive.
  • Brendan Toner shares an eclectic list of techniques for improving productivity.
  • Yanna Vogiazou gets us up to date on gestural interaction – think Kinect games – and our multi-modal future.
  • Bertrand Duperrin thinks that the speed of Saas deployment may already exceed the speed at which organizations can change to adopt them.
  • Dalton Hooper provides some post-interview feedback: why I didn’t hire you, even though you were the most qualified.

Enjoy!

The Sustainability Manifesto for Projects

Aside

The Sustainability ManifestoGlobal project management thought leaders Rich Maltzman, Paola Morgese, Marisa Silva, and Jennifer Tharp have collaborated to create a movement that expects to change our values: The Sustainability Manifesto for Projects.

“We are uncovering better ways of incorporating Sustainability into Project, Program, and Portfolio Management. Through this work we have come to value:

  • Benefits realization over metrics limited to time, scope, and cost
  • Value for many over value of money
  • The long-term impact of our projects over their immediate results”

They go on to define global sustainability, environmental sustainability, social sustainability, and economic sustainability. They also articulate the benefits of sustainability in projects and provide a two-page list of links to supporting documents, blogs, and articles. Just eight slides, including the list of authors.

I can’t recommend this highly enough. Take the five minutes to read this, and share the ideas in it with your colleagues, your sponsors, and your management team.

We’re changing the world, anyway – let’s ensure we make that change sustainable.