New PM Articles for the Week of January 6 – 12

New project management articles published on the web during the week of January 6 – 12. And this week’s video: Mike Clayton shares several witty quotes on nature of projects and the challenges of managing them. Irony, insight, and a couple of laugh-out-loud moments. 6 minutes, safe for work.

Ethics, Business Acumen and Strategy

  • Rich Mironov wants to promote industry discussions about a product code of ethics, to prevent unintended consequences and product misuse. 7 minutes to read.
  • Sharlyn Lauby suggests a half-dozen ways to improve your business acumen. Strategies that work for an HR manager also work for a project manager. 3 minutes to read.
  • Greg Satell on Amazon’s new quantum computing service: “In an ecosystem driven world, power doesn’t lie at the top of value chains, but at the center of networks.” 5 minutes to read.

Managing Projects

  • PMI will make the exposure draft of the seventh edition of the PMBOK available for public comment and review on January 15. Just a minute to read.
  • Cornelius Fichtner talks with Rich Maltzman and Jim Stewart about their new book, How to Facilitate Productive Project Planning Meetings. Podcast, 37 minutes, safe for work.
  • Praveen Malik demonstrates five ways to customize the Gantt chart view in MS Project, a great tool for communicating the schedule. 4 minutes to read.
  • John Goodpasture describes the role of the system integrator in really big projects and programs. 2 minutes to read.
  • Kiron Bondale reflects on how we might handle unresponsive key project stakeholders. 2 minutes to read.
  • Doc Norton expounds on Goodhart’s Law and why guidelines are better than targets. 2 minutes to read.
  • Esther Derby distinguishes between training and education, and why they are better together. 2 minutes to read.

Managing Software Development

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of agile content, from the Descaling Manifesto (not about coffee makers) to team rule-breaking to Scrum Masters on a CEO path. 7 outbound links, 3 minutes to read.
  • Gábor Zöld curates his monthly engineering management resource roundup, from scaling a distributed team (also not about coffee makers) to managing managers to deliberate appreciation. 10 outbound links, 4 minutes to read.
  • Simran Pandey explains how a proof of concept can be used to test an assumption or product idea. 5 minutes to read.
  • Gilad David Maayan describes five metrics that should be useful for teams using agile methods. 4 minutes to read.
  • Tom Cagely begins a series on the issues we commonly encounter when developing a value stream map. About 3 minutes to read. Part 2 is also about 3 minutes.

Applied Leadership

  • Happy IPM DayRuchika Tulshyan gives us permission to ask people how to pronounce their name correctly. Roo-CHEEK-Ah. 7 minutes to read.
  • Gina Abudi asks, have you considered the impact of the change you are leading on you? 2 minutes to read.
  • Adam Grant, an organizational psychologist at the Wharton School, shares his recommended reading list for leaders. 5 minutes to read.

Cybersecurity and Data Protection

  • Michael Grothaus reports that both Mozilla and the US Department of Homeland Security want you to update your Firefox browser. Like, right now. 1 minute to read.
  • Dorit Dor asserts five trends will be prevalent in cybersecurity in 2020. 4 minutes to read.

Pot Pourri

  • Dana Kozubska reports on several trends related to the Internet of Things that should influence business decisions in 2020. 5 minutes to read.
  • Roland Flemm begins a series on systems thinking with an examination of wicked problems. If you are going to intervene, choose wisely. 7 minutes to read.
  • Anne Quito and Dan Kopf illustrate the dispute between designers and statisticians on what makes a good information graphic. 8 minutes to read.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of November 4 – 10

New project management articles published on the web during the week of November 4 – 10. And this week’s video: Mike Clayton tells us why we should aspire to boring projects. Not boring outcomes, but the kind where that which is planned and predicted actually comes to pass, without heroic interventions, all-night problem resolution, or Costco-sized containers of antacids. 4 minutes, safe for work.

Ethics, Business Acumen and Strategy

  • Sean Fleming notes a key finding from PwC’s report, Talent Trends 2019: CEO’s are deeply worried about the availability of skilled workers. 2 minutes to read.
  • Mutale Nkonde considers the question: is addressing any bias displayed by AI applications a matter of corporate social responsibility? 4 minutes to read.
  • Robin Pomeroy poses the ethical questions arising from a new movie starring an actor who has been dead since 1955—James Dean. When do Deepfakes become unethical? 3 minutes to read.

Managing Projects

  • Elizabeth Harrin celebrates International Project Management Day 2019 by focusing on what matters most: your well-being, morale, and mental health. 4 minutes to read.
  • Harry Hall explains how to facilitate the nominal group technique, a powerful tool for helping a small group reach consensus. 2 minutes to read.
  • Praveen Malik explains how to use resource leveling and resource smoothing to create a workable project schedule. 4 minutes to read.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Vicki Griffiths, Chair of the APM Women in Project Management SIG. More than 600 people attended their annual conference in September. Podcast, 24 minutes, safe for work.
  • John Goodpasture explains loose coupling and tight coupling, and how to minimize the effect of tight coupling on project timelines. 2 minutes to read.
  • Andy Jordan applies the Hippocratic maxim—“First, do no harm”—to the PMO. 7 minutes to read.

Managing Software Development

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from agile playbooks to team contracts and alignment maps to product review in dual-tack agile. 7 outbound links, 3 minutes to read.
  • Marcus Blankenship interviews Esther Derby on her new book, Seven Rules for Positive Productive Change. Podcast, 32 minutes, safe for work. Also includes a transcript.
  • Vadym Muraviov describes the structure and hierarchy of user stories, epics, and themes. 3 minutes to read.
  • Jose Casal expounds of the use of flow efficiency in process improvement. 8 minutes to read.
  • Vadim recommends five books, ostensibly for product managers, but applicable to everyone tasked with influencing others. 3 minutes to read.
  • Mike Griffiths shares another extract from his new book, Agile Illustrated: A visual learner’s guide to agility. This section explains the Declaration of Interdependence. 3 minutes to read.
  • Johanna Rothman posted a series on how to create a proposal for a conference presentation. Here is part 2 and part 3. About 17 minutes to read all three parts.

Applied Leadership

  • Karolina Tóth interviews Dan Rummel, Senior Director of Engineering at One Medical, on establishing a foundation of psychological safety. Podcast, 21 minutes, safe for work.
  • Jory MacKay compiled several ways to give and receive negative feedback but begins with the elephant in the room: how we feel about it. 11 minutes to read.
  • Kat Boogaard presents survey results: six ways to make your team more effective. 6 minutes to read.

Cybersecurity and Data Protection

  • Marc Barrachin and Algirde Pipikaite make the case for a global standard for reporting cyberattacks. To fight these crimes, they must be reported. 4 minutes to read.
  • Joan Goodchild interviews Marcy Klipfel on the benefits of a collaboration between IT and HR in setting and training security policies. 3 minutes to read.
  • Justin Rohrlich reports that the Department of Homeland Security will soon have biometric data on nearly 260 million people. This is not good news. 4 minutes to read.

Pot Pourri

  • Emily Stone collected insights from several Kellogg School of Management professors on preparing for career opportunities. 6 minutes to read.
  • Selin Kesebir and colleagues found that men and women have significantly different attitudes toward competition. 4 minutes to read.
  • Amy Irwin collated insights from mental health professionals on how to cope with rudeness in the workplace. 4 minutes to read.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of September 16 – 22

New project management articles published on the web during the week of September 16 – 22. And this week’s video: Mike Clayton advises us on how to succeed in our next project management job interview. 16 minutes, safe for work.

Business Acumen and Strategy

  • Walter Frick reports on efforts to quantify the cost of Brexit uncertainty: executives are spending a lot of time preparing, but no one knows what they are preparing for. 4 minutes to read.
  • Greg Satell notes that the Revolution is over and Digital won. Now, here’s what we need to do in order to be a part of the next revolution. 5 minutes to read.
  • Senior members of the faculty of the Kellogg School of Management discuss shareholder value and the role of the corporation, going forward. 10 minutes to read.

Managing Projects

  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews Carole Osterweil, author of Project Delivery, Uncertainty and Neuroscience: A Leader’s Guide to Walking in Fog. Video, 24 minutes, safe for work.
  • Rich Mironov shares tips for pulling data science into product development processes. Useful for both product managers and project managers. 7 minutes to read.
  • Alison Coleman highlights seven trends that continue to shape the way project management is evolving. 4 minutes to read.
  • Michael Wagner outlines the risks associated with modern technologies and proposes new ethical perspectives on the delivery of projects and outcomes. 9 minutes to read.
  • Pat Weaver posts a new paper and a presentation on technical debt, examining the London Crossrail project. 9 minutes or so to read both.
  • Ben Aston explains the alternatives available for Mac users who are also MS Project users. 9 minutes to read.

Managing Software Development

  • Balloon Over The RoofStefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of agile content, from customer journey teams to understanding user research to product-market fit. 7 outbound links, 3 minutes to read.
  • Johanna Rothman begins a series that expands on the idea of a minimum viable product with other minimum outcomes. 4 minutes to read.
  • Nicola Owen maps the ways in which psychological safety adds value in three Scrum ceremonies. 5 minutes to read.
  • Ignaco Piantanida tutors us on software architecture, with examples. 8 minutes to read.
  • Manjunath Poola makes the case for applying microservices to the front end of an application. 2 minutes to read.
  • Glen Alleman links to an ISO standard and five methods for software development estimation using function points. 2 minutes to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Leigh Espy explains Bikeshedding, an example of Parkinson’s Law of Triviality, and how to avoid letting the trivial-but-familiar take up all available meeting time. 5 minutes to read.
  • Michelle Cheng recaps the findings of 200 scientific studies on how to have effective meetings. 2 minutes to read.
  • Suzanne Lucas shares ten behaviors that establish you as a leader. 3 minutes to read.
  • Lisette Sutherland interviews Magda Ferretti on sharing leadership in virtual teams. Video, 38 minutes, safe for work.

Cybersecurity and Data Protection

  • Terry Sweeney advocates for privacy impact assessments (PIA) in order to help spot risks early in the product development cycle. 3 minutes to read.
  • Jesse Almeda warns that data breach costs will get worse before they get better. 4 minutes to read.
  • CV Madhukar looks at how privacy tech is re-defining the data economy. 4 minutes to read.

Pot Pourri

  • Michael Gorman suggests ten training exercises for your brain. I gave up Sudoku for Spider Solitaire a few years ago—try playing with four suits at once. 4 minutes to read.
  • Stav Ziv explains the combination resume—part reverse chronological, part functional—from who should use one to structure to an actual example. 10 minutes to read.
  • Martin Giles reports that Google has demonstrated a quantum computer with a calculation that took 3 minutes, 20 seconds. The most powerful supercomputer, Summit, would have taken 10,000 years to complete the same chore. 3 minutes to read, unless you’re a quantum computer.

Enjoy!