New PM Articles for the Week of November 28 – December 4

New project management articles published on the web during the week of November 28 – December 4. And this week’s video: children narrate a Museum of London video of a man demonstrating how to cast an axe head using Bronze Age technologies. Just four minutes, safe for work, and far more thought-provoking than anything on television.

Must read / view / listen!

  • Sathappan Chinnakaruppan reports on teaching project management terminology, processes, and skills to sixth-grade kids – including his daughter.
  • Elizabeth Harrin recommends eleven must-have gadgets for the office worker on your holiday gift list.
  • Mike Cohn makes the case for standards of excellence in Agile and stimulates a whole lot of comments.

Established Methods

  • Women Testers Magazine October 2016 edition is now available for download, and it includes a variety of excellent articles. Yes, I know – it’s December …
  • Scott Matteson details ten (non-mutually exclusive) ways to kill a zombie IT project. No edged weapons required.
  • John McIntyre explains why the US government’s Program Management Improvement and Accountability Act is a big deal.
  • John Goodpasture quotes John LeCarre in asserting that part of assessing the quality of data is identifying the source.
  • Kerry Wills demonstrates the value of managing expectations when failure is a distinct possibility.
  • Nick Pisano updates us on progress toward producing a user experience completely under user control.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers shares his weekly round-up of all things Agile, from Scrum to Kanban, and from teams to customers.
  • Johanna Rothman explains why both pushing work (i.e. Scrum) and pulling work (i.e. Kanban) may be right for your team.
  • Dave Prior interviews Derek Huether on the Triangle of Productivity, his new theory on what makes us effective. Just 30 minutes, safe for work.
  • Ben Linders explains the Agile Self-Assessment Game, an interesting way for teams to discover how well they’ve embraced Agile methods.
  • Henny Portman reviews “The Product Samurai,” by Chris Lukassen, which maps the seven principles of the Samurai to product management. But no swords.
  • Shay Peleg debunks a half-dozen myths that senior management frequently believes about Agile methods.
  • Moira Alexander provides the smart person’s guide to Agile project management. Dummies need not apply.

Applied Leadership

  • Michael Wood identifies the critical “people realities” of project management, and the people skills we need to hone to deal with them.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy lists the “do’s” and “don’ts” of successfully managing your project team.
  • Laura Barnard deconstructs the instruction, “Be more strategic.”

Technology and Techniques

  • Jennifer Zaino reports from the Dataversity Enterprise Data World 2016 conference on the existential question: Is NoSQL the future of databases?
  • Jeff Boehm explains the notions behind NewSQL, which attempts to bridge the gap between traditional relational databases and NoSQL.
  • Nir Eyal tells how “multiple discovery theory” explains why great minds think alike, at about the same time.

Working and the Workplace

  • yawn-for-coffeeRebecca Knight provides a detailed course of action in getting your manager’s respect.
  • Leigh Espy talks with Bruce Harpham about how to get project management experience through volunteer work.
  • Nina Semczuk points out three signs your communication skills might need some work.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of September 19 – 25

New project management articles published on the web during the week of September 19 – 25. And this week’s video: psychologist Shawn Achor argues that happiness inspires productivity. Just 12 minutes, safe for work, but people will crowd around to see why you’re laughing uncontrollably.

Must read!

  • Mike Clayton describes Kurt Lewin’s Freeze Phases model of organizational change, which is predicated on the notion of driving forces and restraining forces.
  • Esther Derby collates a list of questions that could lead to more effective organizational change, if they were only asked.
  • Ryan Avent scans past the disruptive trends of automation replacing humans to ask the question: what will a world without work be like and how can we make it livable?

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin celebrates ten years of blogging by following up on the best articles from each of those years (and the most popular so far from 2016).
  • Harry Hall tutors us on the management reserve for project budgets.
  • Shuba Kathikeyan summarizes the steps in project cost management, and recommends several good practices for project managers.
  • John Goodpasture makes the counter-case: measuring everything may be more detrimental than no measurements at all.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Dave Davis on achieving benefits realization management. Just 43 minutes, safe for work.
  • Brian Livingston describes good, bad, and ugly results of project closeout.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of new articles and posts on Agile topics, from people and teams to frameworks and products.
  • Henny Portman reviews The Lean Machine, which describes how Harley-Davidson adopted lean product development.
  • Joel Bancroft-Connors and his gorilla, Hogarth, explain that Agile coaches are like vampires: they have to be invited in.
  • Christian van Stom describes the motivational retrospective, as way to not just refine a process but develop a desirable culture.
  • Dave Prior interviews Agile Manifesto signer Alistair Cockburn in a long (79 minutes), wide-ranging conversation on consulting, Agile, and lifestyle. Safe for work.

Applied Leadership

  • Kent Lefner makes a table of the top ten reasons projects fail from a study by PWC and includes key indicators and considerations for each.
  • The Clever PM makes the practical case for limiting the choices we present to both our teams and the executives.
  • Elizabeth McCormick describes the venerable concept of a Mastermind and explains what you can get from being a party to one.
  • Art Petty lays out five ways we can productive work with people we actively dislike.

Technology and Techniques

  • James Kobelius explains how to apply industrial-style discipline to the development of business analytics.
  • Kupe Kupersmith describes Lean Business Analysis, and a way to reduce waste in getting to decisions.
  • Nicholas Malahosky details twelve ways to improve cross-office collaboration.

Working and the Workplace

  • Bertrand Duperrin looks at a modern torture we inflict on ourselves: the notifications from our devices that interrupt us dozens of times a day.
  • Coert Visser examines deep work, (self-) interruptions and attention residue, and the positive impact of brief breaks.
  • Lisette Sutherland wonders whether it’s time for a digital vacation. Less than eight minutes, safe for work, even if you’ve already set up your out of office message.
  • Brendan Toner revisits his task management review for the new version: Droptask2.0.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of April 18 – 24

New project management articles published on the web during the week of April 18 – 24. And this week’s video: the E-Lesson Guru explains how to create a speedometer chart in Excel. Safe for work, just over 8 minutes.

Must read!

  • Colin Ellis describes the characteristics and behaviors of the Conscious Project Leader.
  • Elizabeth Harrin shares her approach to managing several projects at once.
  • Harry Hall lists twelve common mistakes we make when responding to risks. If you read this one just for the parable about Chippy the Parakeet, Harry won’t object.

Established Methods

  • Richard and Elizabeth Larson argue that organizations benefit when their employees holding professional certifications, and should be willing to support them.
  • Jeff Collins identifies seven project management conferences to be conducted in the U.S. this year.
  • Bruce Harpham notes a number of lessons learned from the Hanford Nuclear Site’s River Corridor Closure Project.
  • David Hillson explains the role of the Risk Facilitator.
  • Shane Vaz shares some lessons learned: four signs your project is in trouble.
  • Ciara McDonnell explains how to use earned value management, with MS Project, Excel, and Sharepoint.
  • Steve Wake, curator of the #EVA conference, reflects on silence and to do lists.
  • Kerry Wills leverages his OCD to keep his anxiety disorder in check. It’s good that there’s a job out there for everyone ….

Agile Methods

  • Dovile Miseviciute shows the power of the Eylean Board. Normally, I avoid product pumps but this looks really interesting.
  • Mike Cohn makes some planning recommendations for highly interrupt-driven Scrum teams, including adjusting the length of sprints.
  • Dave Prior interviews Agile coach Lyssa Adkins on the Agile Institute, combatting burn-out, and self-care. Just 49 minutes, safe for work.
  • Joel Bancroft-Connors considers the question: should a company staff their Agile coaching positions with an employee or a consultant?
  • Pedro Gustavo Torres argues that the Product Owner is a pig (committed), rather than a chicken (involved) and should actively participate in all Scrum ceremonies.
  • Elise Stevens curated links to six articles on digital project management.

Applied Leadership

  • Liane Davey notes that leaders can inadvertently create a lot of work, just by tossing out ideas.
  • John Goodpasture summarizes General Michael Hayden on the safety of “No” and the potential risk and reward of saying “Yes.”
  • Suzanne Lucas explains how to gain the respect of your co-workers.
  • Peter Landau identifies the best leadership and management podcasts out there.

Pot Pouri

  • Elissa Gilbert reports on development of the Industrial Cloud, as the primary transformation mechanism for the Internet of Things, at General Electric.
  • Rich Maltzman reports on the growing number of projects to capture energy from the Moon. Well, OK: the tides. But it’s really, really cool!
  • Roy Sensenbach lists career insights he picked up while learning to snowboard.
  • Imagine digitally tagging footwear and apparel items at the point of manufacture, beginning inventory management at the assembly line. The Internet of Things just added ten billion new end points.

Enjoy!