New PM Articles for the Week of November 3 – 9

Balloon Over the MoonNew project management articles published on the web during the week of November 3 – 9. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

PM Best Practices

  • Gary Nelson presents an interesting case study in cost-benefit analysis.
  • John Goodpasture offers low-cost definitions for a couple of ten-dollar words used by risk management thinkers – epistemic and aleatoric.
  • Matthew Squair offers an intriguing (if slightly nerdy, even for me) example of trading one risk for another.
  • Mike Clayton notes that power is fragmented across most organizations; thus, the need to influence.
  • Bruce Harpham exposes ten sources of project conflict, and a few statistics that put workplace conflict in perspective.
  • Andy Jordan reports from the PMI Global Congress in Phoenix. It sounds like we should plan to go to the one in Orlando, next October.

Agile Methods

  • Mike Cohn concludes his series on velocity-driven versus commitment-driven sprint planning, by explaining his preference.
  • Pawel Brodzinski explains the Kanban approach to portfolio management. “WIP limits … underscore available capabilities as a scarce resource.”
  • Chuck Snead makes the case for creating a project charter as part of Sprint Zero and walks us through the process.
  • Shawn Dickerson advocates for the marriage of Agile methods with a Waterfall approach.
  • Satyajit Sarangi shares some ideas for applying Lean concepts to your practice of Scrum.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Dave Cornelius on his new program, teaching high school students Agile methods as life skills. Just 12 minutes, safe for work.

 Book Reviews

  • Elizabeth Harrin reviews Thomas P. Wise’s new book, “Trust in Virtual Teams,” a guide to explaining and building trust … well, you get the idea.
  • Henny Portman reviews Rod Snowden’s book, “MSP Survival Guide for Business Change Managers,” where MSP = “Managing Successful Programmes.”
  • Michel Dion summarizes Susanne Madsen’s upcoming book, “The Power of Project Leadership.”
  • Toby Elwin reviews Warren Berger’s new book, “A more Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthough Ideas.”
  • Glen Alleman shares a list of books on estimating software projects.

Trends

  • Peter Saddington casts a dubious eye on “Recruiting 3.0” as described by Ron Thomas. The quality of user-generated content does not predict job performance.
  • Teena Hammond shares the results of a survey of IT decision makers, in an attempt to predict which of the emerging trends will actually matter.
  • Joe Panettieri reports on the relatively disappointing ROI of Big Data projects. Well, it took heavier-than-air flight a while to become commercially viable …
  • Jelani Harper explains the concept of “Data Lakes,” and why it might be a good fit for organizations with a disciplined approach to data governance.

Professional Development

  • Coert Visser reinforces the idea that coaching is not about the coach, and you don’t have to understand the subject matter in order to be an effective facilitator.
  • Suzanne Lucas summarizes results of a survey by recruiting software house iCIMS that confirms recruiters and hiring managers are not communicating very well.
  • Cheri Baker observes that, as small companies succeed and grow, many of the long-term employees grieve for their old culture.
  • Alina Vrabie suggests some strategies for the introverted leader.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of October 27 – November 2

Just OverheadNew project management articles published on the web during the week of October 27 – November 2. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

PM Best Practices

  • The second edition of Women Testers Magazine is now available. Not just for women or testers – this is some truly excellent content. Highly recommended!
  • John Goodpasture considers two views of “architecture.”
  • A Business Cloud News survey found that IT isn’t really driving SaaS adoption, and cloud-based applications are still providing data security challenges.
  • Andy Jordan concludes his long series on organizational risk management.
  • Johanna Rothman lays out an approach for tactical management.
  • Bruce Benson makes the case for getting into the weeds – researching the history, understanding past performance, and scheduling based on demonstrated capabilities.
  • Rebecca Mayville uses the butterfly as a metaphor for driving positive change.
  • Michelle Stronach recounts a sad story of how she took over a project in progress, from a well-liked, competent project manager who passed away.

Agile Methods

  • Kailash Awati describes how to apply the principles of emergent design to enterprise IT.
  • Glen Alleman shares his article, “Agile Program Management,” published in Cutter Journal. A long but excellent read.
  • Mike Cohn continues his series on sprint planning with the commitment-driven approach.
  • David Anderson notes that, as soon as organizations get used to time-boxing, they shrink the size of the boxes. Kanban (naturally) avoids this trap!
  • Don Kim believes that the Scrum team will only succeed if the Product Owner truly understands what is needed and can communicate it effectively.
  • Ravi Nihesh Srivastava proposes using Scrum to produce a high-quality technical proposal.

Leadership

  • Bob Tarne summarizes keys points from a recent presentation by Tom Peters.
  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews Oana Krogh-Nielsen, Head of the PMO for the National Electrification Program for the Danish rail system, Banedanmark.
  • Bruce Harpham interviews Terry Schmidt, whose resume begins with his internship at NASA during the Apollo Moon landing program, on strategic project management.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Joseph Flahiff at the PMI Global Congress, on his new book, “Being Agile in a Waterfall World.” Just 30 minutes, safe for work.
  • Dave Prior rounds up with fellow Agilistocrats Richard Cheng and Dhaval Panchal to discuss Agile misconceptions they see in training classes. Just 15 minutes, safe for work.
  • Margaret Meloni shares an article by Roxi Hewertson, “Lead Like it Matters.” Just 3 minutes, safe for work.
  • Craig, Tony, and Renee interview Em Campbell-Pretty on the Scaled Agile Framework. Just 35 minutes, SAFe for work. Oh, stop rolling your eyes …

Pot Pouri

  • Linky van der Merwe tells us about the African Storybook Project, which aims to translate children’s stories into African languages and publish them on the internet.
  • Pat Weaver celebrates the 30th anniversary of the PMP examination with a brief history of PMI, the PMBOK, and the PMP credential.
  • Ralf Finchett shows the Project De-Motivational posters he’s been working on, and asks if we have any ideas. Wait until I take my medication, Ralf …
  • Kerry Wills finds the humor in Reply to All when “All” is the entire company.

Enjoy!

Join Me at the Conscious Software Development Telesummit

Successfully creating custom software for your organization is incredibly difficult – over 70% of all projects struggle or fail outright. You’ve probably seen some of these all-too-common issues:

  • Deploying late
  • Finishing over budget
  • Missing or buggy features
  • Requirements scope creep
  • Team miscommunication and conflict
  • “Shelfware” that is just not adopted by users
  • Projects not aligned to the organization’s strategy

And software projects can be a headache to hire for, manage, and architect well. But you can you start improving the odds of success, through a combination of awareness and choice.

The Conscious Software Development Telesummit

ConsciousnessJoin me at the Conscious Software Development Telesummit, to be conducted from November 10th through the 21st, 2014. It’s easy to participate: just register for the summit for free, using your EMail. You’ll be able to download and listen to interviews conducted with more than twenty experts on software, team relations, strategy, project management, deployment and more. You’ll discover things that you don’t know that you don’t know about creating successful projects, building teams, and managing your software portfolio. This elite group of software superstars, best selling authors, popular podcasters, outstanding bloggers, and celebrity coaches are imparting decades of experience, wisdom, and some very generous free resources to help you begin making progress immediately.

This unique panel of experts is all unified under one vision; to empower you with practical understanding of how you can put their knowledge to use, bring consciousness to your software challenges and transform your work for the better. The subject of my interview, “The Zombie Apocalypse is Not an HR Product: How to Hire, Retain, and Develop the Living,” is just one topic among many designed for the IT manager and practitioner. Browse the list of speakers, and you’ll see many familiar names from my weekly round-ups.

Listen Offline!

You can listen to these MP3 interview recordings whenever and wherever you have the  time. Join other leading CIOs, VPs of Development, project managers, architects, stakeholders, end user champions, and all those want to bring more awareness and choice to the complex art of software creation. And I’m not just one of the speakers – I plan to listen to every one of these interviews!

#CSD14