New PM Articles for the Week of October 3 – 9

New project management articles published on the web during the week of October 3 – 9. And this week’s video: a quick explanation of how to hack your to-do list, with David Allen of “Getting Things Done.” Just over two minutes and safe for work, even with all of the monkey noises. Tip of the hat to Harry Hall, who also linked to this video.

Must read!

  • Rich Maltzman reviews the business case and ROI from sustainability projects. This isn’t just about the future – it’s about successful projects and organizations.
  • Andy Jordan explains how we can incorporate accountability for delivering on time, in scope, and within budget without hampering the collaboration that makes it possible.
  • Beth Spriggs makes the case for ambiguity as opportunity – to take risks, think creatively, and create exceptional outcomes.

Established Methods

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Cyndi Snyder Dionisio, who chaired the team that developed the “PMBOK Guide – Sixth Edition.” Just 37 minutes, safe for work.
  • Peter Taylor gives us a primer on the PMO as a source of standard processes and then follows up with six more critical lessons for PMO success.
  • Phillip Smith explores the notion that better project management talent will lead to better projects.
  • Andrew Huckey shows how to apply Critical Chain project management techniques to optimize the family’s morning routine.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy shares his list of risk categories, for use in identifying project risks. Also known as a risk taxonomy, this approach can improve the quality of your risk management.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers posts his weekly round-up of Agile posts, articles, and what-not from Scrum anti-patterns to the Spotify model that isn’t there.
  • Johanna Rothman continues her series on Agile project managers, from what they do not do to how the product manager and project manager roles intersect.
  • Henny Portman reviews “Estimating in Agile,” by Mairi Osborne and Barbara Roberts.
  • Natalie Warnert reports on the #WomenInAgile session at the Agile 2016 conference.
  • Ryan Ripley interviews Steve Denning and Don Gray to discuss the current state of Agile and how an Agile mindset trumps processes and tools. Just 45 minutes, safe for work.
  • Ricardo Lopez explains how the team can make a busy product manager more effective.

Applied Leadership

  • Art Petty’s new book, “Leadership Caffeine for the Project Manager,” is now available.
  • Alison DeNisco reports on five recommendations from author and professor David Burkus on how to modernize your management style.
  • Stephanie Ray examines the power of the Quiet Revolution and the natural advantages of introverts as leaders.
  • David Brendel tells the first-time leader, “Relax.” You have to overcome the stress of your new role before you can become successful.

Technology and Techniques

  • Bertrand Duperrin tracks the evolution of the HR information system to an employee relationship management solution.
  • Kamesh Ganeson compares and contrasts two popular IT governance frameworks: COBIT and ITIL.
  • Hope Reese test drives the Tesla Model S, equipped with the world’s first AI-powered semi-autonomous car.

Working and the Workplace

  • Elise Stevens interviews Kerryn Fewster and Vicki Daniel on how project managers can become more resilient. Just 22 minutes, safe for work.
  • Nancy Settle-Murphy examines the loss of our ability to hold conversations, and how to bring it back.
  • Lisette Sutherland contemplates transitions – when someone leaves the virtual team. Just 7 minutes, safe for work.
  • Roy Maurer reports on new research that indicates about 4 in 10 U.S. workers would prefer to work outside of the traditional, full-time, salaried 40-hour workweek.

Enjoy!

TimeCamp Lists the Top Project Management Influencers

The folks at TimeCamp took some time out from developing and supporting their cloud-based project time tracking and invoicing solution to compile a list of the top project management influencers. The list includes academics and practitioners, coaches and consultants, bloggers and authors, working from locations on five continents.

If you use an RSS reader to keep track of your favorite content sources (I use Feedly), it’s worth scanning their list in order to see if there’s someone else you should follow.

Thanks for including me on your list,TimeCamp! And thanks to all of the other folks who take the time to share what they’ve learned.

New PM Articles for the Week of March 28 – April 3

New project management articles published on the web during the week of March 28 – April 3. And this week’s video: Coert Vissar diagrams the difference in motivation between our autonomous choices and those choices made for us. Complete with a slide guitar soundtrack; two minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Johanna Rothman’s new book, “Agile and Lean Program Management,” is now available.
  • Harry Hall shares three brief videos on making and executing better decisions.
  • Nancy Settle-Murphy explains how to get a conversation going by asking the right questions. If you spend much of your working day on conference calls, be sure to read this!

Established Methods

  • Laura Barnard applies some lessons on stakeholder management learned from Fred Rogers.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Julie Goff on managing a team of project managers. Just 16 minutes, safe for work.
  • Elizabeth Harrin shares her recent reading list. What does work-life balance look like? Well, start here.
  • Klaus Nielsen applies lessons from Daniel Kahneman’s book, “Thinking: Fast and Slow” to project management.
  • Dave Wakeman articulates the five steps in putting a new process in place.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Joe Drammissi on Enlightened Project Management. Just 33 minutes, safe for work.
  • Nick Pisoni explains the difference between measuring progress against plan (earned value) and progress during development (technical performance).
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy gets us back to basics in describing what to include in a project plan.
  • Glen Alleman adapts Jon Stewart’s final rant on “The Daily Show” to direct it toward his favorite target, the #NoEstimates movement.

Agile Methods

  • Mishkin Berteig lays out the four principles of refactoring. Sometimes, good software engineering can be a metaphor for life.
  • John Goodpasture introduces the notion of coupling to a discussion of architecture in an Agile approach.
  • The Clever PM (possibly) concludes his series, “Why Agile isn’t working for me.” This time, the focus is on individual actions.
  • Jake Bartlett points out some of the reasons Agile is hard to adopt.

Applied Leadership

  • Kathleen O’Connor interviews Ray Zinn, who founded and led semiconductor manufacturer Micrel for 37 years, on key lessons from his new book, “Tough Things First.”
  • Liane Davey shares a simple exercise that exposes each participant’s default reaction to change.
  • Peter Saddington shares a great infographic: 18 Things Mentally Strong People Do.
  • Scott Berkun uses the history of the Eiffel Tower to illustrate what it takes to drive real innovation and see it produce real change.
  • Eileen Burton says that great leaders are those who step up in a crisis.

Pot Pouri

  • Suzanne Lucas says that recruiters are good at spotting lies. Here are a few things that you really don’t need to lie about.
  • Jamie Hale gives us science-based recommendations on how to study. Key point: we best remember that which we best understand.
  • Steve Johnson identifies four “areas of expertise” that should drive what is (and isn’t) required in a job candidate.
  • Paul Sawyers opines on the market viability of an internet of consumer product things. Who needs a smart oven in the microwave society?

Enjoy!