New PM Articles for the Week of June 6 – 12

New project management articles published on the web during the week of June 6 – 12. And this week’s video: Ed Deci’s TED Talk on controlled motivation and autonomous motivation. Ed is the co-developer of the self-determination theory, which suggests that we should create conditions under which people can motivate themselves. Just 14 minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Johanna Rothman presents the case for and against estimates, in parts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. This series should be sufficient justification for you to follow her blogs.
  • Nick Statt reports on Microsoft’s new project management app for Office 365, called Planner. Not a replacement for Project, but a collaboration and planning tool.
  • Brad Egeland provides one-page summaries for twelve project management, collaboration, and portfolio management software products.

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin collected insights from six PM’s on how they manage multiple simultaneous projects.
  • Pat Weaver looks into those cases where the critical path includes task dependencies other than Finish-to-Start links.
  • Clark Wimberly notes that proper preparation is required for a kick-off meeting which will pay dividends throughout the project.
  • Henny Portman reviews “PPM! Manage Your Organization Masterfully with Project portfolio Management.”
  • Cameron Conaway interviews Robin Kwong, Special Projects Editor at the Financial Times, who find clarity by beginning each project with the same question: What’s it for?
  • Kenneth Ashe explains how to create and use an Issues Log.
  • Rob England proposed two deliberately conflicting principles to guide a DevOps transformation, in order to create a dynamic tension. Which is how the world works, right?

Agile Methods

  • Dave Prior notes the untimely passing of Agile leading light Jean Tabaka by pulling two interviews from his archives. A total of 42 minutes, safe for work. She will be sorely missed.
  • Saumya Nigam explains estimation using story points.
  • Faisal Ansari uses the INVEST model to determine whether backlog items are well written, as the first step in splitting them into smaller stories.
  • Emanuele Passera continues his introduction to Kanban series with part 2.
  • Tom McFarlin considers Reid Hoffman’s quote, “If you’re not embarrassed by the first version of your product, then you’ve launched too late.”
  • Tami Flowers describes using Lean/ Agile methods to establish a data governance organization framework.
  • Bob Tarne explains the concept of “ready ready.” It’s where you need to begin in order to get to “done done.” You can say that again …

Applied Leadership

  • Suresh MK uses events from the life of Nelson Mandela to illustrate John Kotter’s eight-stage process of creating major change.
  • Kathleen O’Connor interviews Bart Engal on his book, “Leading Through Language: choosing Words that Influence and Inspire.”
  • Lysette Sutherland interviews Dave Hecker on effectively managing geographically distributed software development teams. Just 35 minutes, safe for work.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Gillian Klette on what to do when your project team hates each other. Just 18 minutes, safe for work.

Pot Pouri

  • David Manheim looks at complexity, reification, Goodhart’s Law, and why measurement is hard. So is spelling reification.
  • Travis Bradberry explains why you should work for 52 minutes, then take a break for 17 minutes. Got your timer ready?
  • Abby Wolfe shares an infographic on the high-impact LinkedIn profile updates you should make when job-hunting.
  • Seth Godin suggests we talk slowly, because “um” doesn’t add as much value as silence.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of March 28 – April 3

New project management articles published on the web during the week of March 28 – April 3. And this week’s video: Coert Vissar diagrams the difference in motivation between our autonomous choices and those choices made for us. Complete with a slide guitar soundtrack; two minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Johanna Rothman’s new book, “Agile and Lean Program Management,” is now available.
  • Harry Hall shares three brief videos on making and executing better decisions.
  • Nancy Settle-Murphy explains how to get a conversation going by asking the right questions. If you spend much of your working day on conference calls, be sure to read this!

Established Methods

  • Laura Barnard applies some lessons on stakeholder management learned from Fred Rogers.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Julie Goff on managing a team of project managers. Just 16 minutes, safe for work.
  • Elizabeth Harrin shares her recent reading list. What does work-life balance look like? Well, start here.
  • Klaus Nielsen applies lessons from Daniel Kahneman’s book, “Thinking: Fast and Slow” to project management.
  • Dave Wakeman articulates the five steps in putting a new process in place.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Joe Drammissi on Enlightened Project Management. Just 33 minutes, safe for work.
  • Nick Pisoni explains the difference between measuring progress against plan (earned value) and progress during development (technical performance).
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy gets us back to basics in describing what to include in a project plan.
  • Glen Alleman adapts Jon Stewart’s final rant on “The Daily Show” to direct it toward his favorite target, the #NoEstimates movement.

Agile Methods

  • Mishkin Berteig lays out the four principles of refactoring. Sometimes, good software engineering can be a metaphor for life.
  • John Goodpasture introduces the notion of coupling to a discussion of architecture in an Agile approach.
  • The Clever PM (possibly) concludes his series, “Why Agile isn’t working for me.” This time, the focus is on individual actions.
  • Jake Bartlett points out some of the reasons Agile is hard to adopt.

Applied Leadership

  • Kathleen O’Connor interviews Ray Zinn, who founded and led semiconductor manufacturer Micrel for 37 years, on key lessons from his new book, “Tough Things First.”
  • Liane Davey shares a simple exercise that exposes each participant’s default reaction to change.
  • Peter Saddington shares a great infographic: 18 Things Mentally Strong People Do.
  • Scott Berkun uses the history of the Eiffel Tower to illustrate what it takes to drive real innovation and see it produce real change.
  • Eileen Burton says that great leaders are those who step up in a crisis.

Pot Pouri

  • Suzanne Lucas says that recruiters are good at spotting lies. Here are a few things that you really don’t need to lie about.
  • Jamie Hale gives us science-based recommendations on how to study. Key point: we best remember that which we best understand.
  • Steve Johnson identifies four “areas of expertise” that should drive what is (and isn’t) required in a job candidate.
  • Paul Sawyers opines on the market viability of an internet of consumer product things. Who needs a smart oven in the microwave society?

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of March 7 – 13

New project management articles published on the web during the week of March 7 – 13. And this week’s video: David Letterman’s classic photo-identification quiz, “Trump or Monkey?” Four minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Mike Griffiths expounds on whether certification should indicate a ceiling or a floor of professional learning, and illustrates his point with historical examples.
  • Seth Godin explains the difference between confidence and arrogance, when making the case for change.
  • Lynda Bourne continues her examination of Practical Ethics. “The ethical standards of an organization are set by the actionsof its leaders.”

Established Methods

  • Samad Aidane interviews Suzie Blaszkiewicz, market analyst at GetApp, on their new report: 2016’s Top Project Management Apps.
  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews CEO, project manager, and entrepreneur Monica Borrell.
  • Douglas Brown on making process changes stick: “Best practices are a destination, not a starting point.”
  • Susanne Madsen explains the importance of positive relationships with project stakeholders, and how to develop them.
  • Brad Egeland offers five ideas for making meetings more productive that probably run counter to other advice you’ve seen.
  • Harry Hall explains the difference between qualitative and quantitative risk analysis, and offers suggestions on how to improve your approach.

Agile Methods

  • Neil Killick looks for a patch of common ground between #Estimates and #NoEstimates.
  • Glen Alleman responds to Neil on that common ground between #Estimates and #NoEstimates.
  • Johanna Rothman posted a four-part series on how Agile approaches influence the way we test, from our expectations to our practices to metrics. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4.
  • Mike Cohn recommends some alternatives approaches when developing reports that are too complex to deliver in one sprint.
  • Fernando Paloma Garcia explains how to stabilize quality and prepare to evolve the features of legacy applications by establishing a base of automated tests.
  • Shashank Sinha describes an example of how Agile methods were applied to the evolution of an enterprise legacy system.

Applied Leadership

  • Art Petty notes that good managers focus on what the people are doing, not just the tasks.
  • John Goodpasture considers un-delegation, based on the Principle of Subsidiarity.
  • Nancy Settle-Murphy addresses three questions from her Wall Street Journal interview, on dealing with issues between the remote worker and a problematic boss.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy explains how to develop a project management dream team.
  • Lisa Earle McLeod extols the virtues of Essentialism, “the disciplined pursuit of Less.”

Pot Pouri

  • Bruce Harpham offers some guidance for making remote work productive.
  • Brendan Toner shares an eclectic list of techniques for improving productivity.
  • Yanna Vogiazou gets us up to date on gestural interaction – think Kinect games – and our multi-modal future.
  • Bertrand Duperrin thinks that the speed of Saas deployment may already exceed the speed at which organizations can change to adopt them.
  • Dalton Hooper provides some post-interview feedback: why I didn’t hire you, even though you were the most qualified.

Enjoy!