Join Me at the Conscious Software Development Telesummit

Successfully creating custom software for your organization is incredibly difficult – over 70% of all projects struggle or fail outright. You’ve probably seen some of these all-too-common issues:

  • Deploying late
  • Finishing over budget
  • Missing or buggy features
  • Requirements scope creep
  • Team miscommunication and conflict
  • “Shelfware” that is just not adopted by users
  • Projects not aligned to the organization’s strategy

And software projects can be a headache to hire for, manage, and architect well. But you can you start improving the odds of success, through a combination of awareness and choice.

The Conscious Software Development Telesummit

ConsciousnessJoin me at the Conscious Software Development Telesummit, to be conducted from November 10th through the 21st, 2014. It’s easy to participate: just register for the summit for free, using your EMail. You’ll be able to download and listen to interviews conducted with more than twenty experts on software, team relations, strategy, project management, deployment and more. You’ll discover things that you don’t know that you don’t know about creating successful projects, building teams, and managing your software portfolio. This elite group of software superstars, best selling authors, popular podcasters, outstanding bloggers, and celebrity coaches are imparting decades of experience, wisdom, and some very generous free resources to help you begin making progress immediately.

This unique panel of experts is all unified under one vision; to empower you with practical understanding of how you can put their knowledge to use, bring consciousness to your software challenges and transform your work for the better. The subject of my interview, “The Zombie Apocalypse is Not an HR Product: How to Hire, Retain, and Develop the Living,” is just one topic among many designed for the IT manager and practitioner. Browse the list of speakers, and you’ll see many familiar names from my weekly round-ups.

Listen Offline!

You can listen to these MP3 interview recordings whenever and wherever you have the  time. Join other leading CIOs, VPs of Development, project managers, architects, stakeholders, end user champions, and all those want to bring more awareness and choice to the complex art of software creation. And I’m not just one of the speakers – I plan to listen to every one of these interviews!

#CSD14

The Best Teacher You Never Had

A few weeks ago, I was approached by fellow project management blogger Geoff Crane. Long-time readers of my weekly round-ups will recognize the name immediately – Geoff is the man behind PaperCut PM, and one of the funniest guys in our business. He’s also a new college professor, and his first project management class just graduated. To commemorate their milestone (and his), Geoff wanted to give them a going-away present – good advice from practicing project managers on how to get into the field, and how to manage your career once you get in. He’d compile the advice into an e-book, give it to them, and share it with the world. Would I contribute? Of course – I sent him my 300 words the same day!

The class has now graduated, and Geoff has published the e-book. As a testament to his influence in the industry, fifty-two of us stepped up to provide content. Looking at the list, I see a lot of very accomplished, well-known names, as well as a few I haven’t heard from before. Never mind; I’ll be following them from now on. Reading their contributions makes me proud to be part of this project management community. I’m honored to be in their company, and grateful to Geoff for including me in this monumental, quick-turnaround effort.

I urge you to take a few minutes to read some of these short notes, and pass along the advice in them to project management students, practitioners, and managers – it’s that widely applicable. You might even find a few things for yourself in this treasure chest.

Once again: thanks, Professor Crane. You’re all right, in my book.

 

 

Project Management Job Requirements Study Announced

Job ApplicantsNoel Radley, the managing editor for SoftwareAdvice.com, published the results of an interesting survey last month. They looked at three hundred job listings on job board-scraper Indeed.com for project managers. The intent was to compare requirements for positions across three sectors: aerospace, healthcare, and information technology. The points of comparison were education, certifications, and years of experience.

The team at SoftwareAdvice.com chose these three sectors based on PMI’s Industry Growth Forecast, published last year. The Forecast estimates 6.2 million new project management roles will be created in the United States between 2010 and 2020. PMI anticipates job growth in aerospace, healthcare, and information technology will each be over 12 percent.

Radley says, “After reading how 6.2 million new project management jobs are anticipated to be created by 2020, we wanted to understand what qualifications employers are looking for in the project manager role. We wanted project managers to be able to better understand trends in their sector: how many years of experience are wanted (on average), what the biggest industries for PM are, and if PM job seekers need to be investing in higher education and certifications to secure these jobs. We also wanted to give project managers a sense of whether they would be competitive if they decided to switch industries, helping them to think through what it would take to transition and seek a new opportunity.”

What I found interesting in the results was the reduced importance of education, especially advanced degrees, for companies hiring project managers. The skills gap referenced in the PMI Forecast is manifesting here first, as companies lower their academic expectations of new hires. If you don’t have a degree, but you have lots of industry and project management experience, you might be preferred over the recent graduate.

Another of their findings was that, of those job postings specifying a professional certification, the PMP credential was the most commonly mentioned – as expected for project manager in the U.S. If you don’t have a degree, that PMP may provide an additional edge.

I’d be interested in hearing from recent job seekers and hires whether it seems like the bar is getting lower, in terms of education and experience, and whether these “requirements” are becoming “preferred.” Leave a comment, and let’s add some anecdotes to Noel’s insightful analysis.