New PM Articles for the Week of October 3 – 9

New project management articles published on the web during the week of October 3 – 9. And this week’s video: a quick explanation of how to hack your to-do list, with David Allen of “Getting Things Done.” Just over two minutes and safe for work, even with all of the monkey noises. Tip of the hat to Harry Hall, who also linked to this video.

Must read!

  • Rich Maltzman reviews the business case and ROI from sustainability projects. This isn’t just about the future – it’s about successful projects and organizations.
  • Andy Jordan explains how we can incorporate accountability for delivering on time, in scope, and within budget without hampering the collaboration that makes it possible.
  • Beth Spriggs makes the case for ambiguity as opportunity – to take risks, think creatively, and create exceptional outcomes.

Established Methods

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Cyndi Snyder Dionisio, who chaired the team that developed the “PMBOK Guide – Sixth Edition.” Just 37 minutes, safe for work.
  • Peter Taylor gives us a primer on the PMO as a source of standard processes and then follows up with six more critical lessons for PMO success.
  • Phillip Smith explores the notion that better project management talent will lead to better projects.
  • Andrew Huckey shows how to apply Critical Chain project management techniques to optimize the family’s morning routine.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy shares his list of risk categories, for use in identifying project risks. Also known as a risk taxonomy, this approach can improve the quality of your risk management.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers posts his weekly round-up of Agile posts, articles, and what-not from Scrum anti-patterns to the Spotify model that isn’t there.
  • Johanna Rothman continues her series on Agile project managers, from what they do not do to how the product manager and project manager roles intersect.
  • Henny Portman reviews “Estimating in Agile,” by Mairi Osborne and Barbara Roberts.
  • Natalie Warnert reports on the #WomenInAgile session at the Agile 2016 conference.
  • Ryan Ripley interviews Steve Denning and Don Gray to discuss the current state of Agile and how an Agile mindset trumps processes and tools. Just 45 minutes, safe for work.
  • Ricardo Lopez explains how the team can make a busy product manager more effective.

Applied Leadership

  • Art Petty’s new book, “Leadership Caffeine for the Project Manager,” is now available.
  • Alison DeNisco reports on five recommendations from author and professor David Burkus on how to modernize your management style.
  • Stephanie Ray examines the power of the Quiet Revolution and the natural advantages of introverts as leaders.
  • David Brendel tells the first-time leader, “Relax.” You have to overcome the stress of your new role before you can become successful.

Technology and Techniques

  • Bertrand Duperrin tracks the evolution of the HR information system to an employee relationship management solution.
  • Kamesh Ganeson compares and contrasts two popular IT governance frameworks: COBIT and ITIL.
  • Hope Reese test drives the Tesla Model S, equipped with the world’s first AI-powered semi-autonomous car.

Working and the Workplace

  • Elise Stevens interviews Kerryn Fewster and Vicki Daniel on how project managers can become more resilient. Just 22 minutes, safe for work.
  • Nancy Settle-Murphy examines the loss of our ability to hold conversations, and how to bring it back.
  • Lisette Sutherland contemplates transitions – when someone leaves the virtual team. Just 7 minutes, safe for work.
  • Roy Maurer reports on new research that indicates about 4 in 10 U.S. workers would prefer to work outside of the traditional, full-time, salaried 40-hour workweek.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of July 18 – 24

New project management articles published on the web during the week of July 18 – 24. And this week’s video: the maiden flight of Aquila, Facebook’s solar-powered unmanned aircraft, designed to bring internet connectivity to the rest of the world. Just three minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Harry Hall describes several responses that project managers might make to respond to stakeholder conflict – not all of them good.
  • Paul Culmsee and his kids prepared a four-minute video they call “A TEDdy Talk,” explaining his new book with Kailash Awati, “The Heretic’s Guide to Management.” Safe for work.
  • PMI announced that the PMBOK Guide-Sixth Edition, with extended coverage of Agile methods, and a practice guide focused on Agile will be released during the third quarter of 2017.

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin makes the argument that contributions to organizational strategic goals are a more useful project metric than alignment with those strategic goals.
  • Stuart Easton describes the annual project budgeting process as a “beauty parade,” and challenges the PMO to define value.
  • Priyanka Chakraborty reports that IT project failure rates are essentially unchanged from three years ago. If we can’t be good, let’s at least be predictable?
  • John Goodpasture expands on a quote from Tony Hoare to explore the inductive nature of software testing.
  • PMI has made their Pulse of the Profession 2016 report available for download. Title: “Delivering Value: Focus on benefits during project execution.”
  • Mike Griffiths models the business case for when software development outsourcing makes sense.
  • Glen Alleman shares his reading list of systems engineering textbooks.
  • Keith Foote gives us a primer on Big Data and cloud security.

Agile Methods

  • Johanna Rothman posted a two-part series on how to get to a frictionless release. Here’s part 2.
  • Dave Prior interviews Liana Dore, Agile Governance lead for eVestment, on the Agile PMO. Just 26 minutes, safe for work.
  • Mike Cohn addresses the question posed by the #NoProjects folks.
  • Lance Knight recounts a tale of two Scrum teams: one with a ScrumMaster who understood team dynamics, and one … well, you get the idea.
  • Natalie Warnert notes that even software teams grieve at the end of their projects.

Applied Leadership

  • David Robins offers some thoughts on managing remote workers, from processes and tools to characteristics of people who can and cannot work well remotely.
  • Kathleen O’Connor interviews former HR executive Larry Solomon on his new book, “Translate, Motivate, Activate: A Leader’s Guide to Mobilizing Change.”
  • Michael Lopp announces coming release of the third edition of “Managing Humans.”
  • Bas de Baat lists the actions needed to get a team “in the zone.”

Working and the Workplace

  • Microsoft announced the Microsoft Professional Degree program, “A university caliber curriculum for professionals at any stage in their career.”
  • Kristin Hillery collected ideas on maintaining work-life balance from a number of folks who work from offices in their home.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Jane Anderson on using LinkedIn to build your personal brand. Just 24 minutes, safe for work.
  • Suzanne Lucas briefs us on compliance with the new overtime regulations here in the US.
  • Steven Pressfield lists ten classic books on productivity, old and new.

Enjoy!

Exposure Draft for the PMBOK Guide – Sixth Edition

PMBOK Guide 5th EditionPMI is updating the PMBOK Guide, once again. As they have done with prior updates, an exposure draft is available from now through April 6, 2016 for comment by PMI members in good standing.

Key changes to this edition are:

  • The inclusion of more detailed information on agile and other iterative practices including:
    • Information about agile and other practices often used in an adaptive environment in each Knowledge Area section (Sections 4–13)
    • An appendix to The Standard for Project Management on agile and other iterative practices
  • A new chapter on the role of the project manager which discusses the PMI Talent Triangle, including greater emphasis on the strategic and business knowledge aspect of project management

It seems that each release of the PMBOK Guide includes a bit more input from advocates for Agile methods. It’s good to see the Standard keeping pace with current notions of best practices.