New PM Articles for the Week of July 18 – 24

New project management articles published on the web during the week of July 18 – 24. And this week’s video: the maiden flight of Aquila, Facebook’s solar-powered unmanned aircraft, designed to bring internet connectivity to the rest of the world. Just three minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Harry Hall describes several responses that project managers might make to respond to stakeholder conflict – not all of them good.
  • Paul Culmsee and his kids prepared a four-minute video they call “A TEDdy Talk,” explaining his new book with Kailash Awati, “The Heretic’s Guide to Management.” Safe for work.
  • PMI announced that the PMBOK Guide-Sixth Edition, with extended coverage of Agile methods, and a practice guide focused on Agile will be released during the third quarter of 2017.

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin makes the argument that contributions to organizational strategic goals are a more useful project metric than alignment with those strategic goals.
  • Stuart Easton describes the annual project budgeting process as a “beauty parade,” and challenges the PMO to define value.
  • Priyanka Chakraborty reports that IT project failure rates are essentially unchanged from three years ago. If we can’t be good, let’s at least be predictable?
  • John Goodpasture expands on a quote from Tony Hoare to explore the inductive nature of software testing.
  • PMI has made their Pulse of the Profession 2016 report available for download. Title: “Delivering Value: Focus on benefits during project execution.”
  • Mike Griffiths models the business case for when software development outsourcing makes sense.
  • Glen Alleman shares his reading list of systems engineering textbooks.
  • Keith Foote gives us a primer on Big Data and cloud security.

Agile Methods

  • Johanna Rothman posted a two-part series on how to get to a frictionless release. Here’s part 2.
  • Dave Prior interviews Liana Dore, Agile Governance lead for eVestment, on the Agile PMO. Just 26 minutes, safe for work.
  • Mike Cohn addresses the question posed by the #NoProjects folks.
  • Lance Knight recounts a tale of two Scrum teams: one with a ScrumMaster who understood team dynamics, and one … well, you get the idea.
  • Natalie Warnert notes that even software teams grieve at the end of their projects.

Applied Leadership

  • David Robins offers some thoughts on managing remote workers, from processes and tools to characteristics of people who can and cannot work well remotely.
  • Kathleen O’Connor interviews former HR executive Larry Solomon on his new book, “Translate, Motivate, Activate: A Leader’s Guide to Mobilizing Change.”
  • Michael Lopp announces coming release of the third edition of “Managing Humans.”
  • Bas de Baat lists the actions needed to get a team “in the zone.”

Working and the Workplace

  • Microsoft announced the Microsoft Professional Degree program, “A university caliber curriculum for professionals at any stage in their career.”
  • Kristin Hillery collected ideas on maintaining work-life balance from a number of folks who work from offices in their home.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Jane Anderson on using LinkedIn to build your personal brand. Just 24 minutes, safe for work.
  • Suzanne Lucas briefs us on compliance with the new overtime regulations here in the US.
  • Steven Pressfield lists ten classic books on productivity, old and new.

Enjoy!

Exposure Draft for the PMBOK Guide – Sixth Edition

PMBOK Guide 5th EditionPMI is updating the PMBOK Guide, once again. As they have done with prior updates, an exposure draft is available from now through April 6, 2016 for comment by PMI members in good standing.

Key changes to this edition are:

  • The inclusion of more detailed information on agile and other iterative practices including:
    • Information about agile and other practices often used in an adaptive environment in each Knowledge Area section (Sections 4–13)
    • An appendix to The Standard for Project Management on agile and other iterative practices
  • A new chapter on the role of the project manager which discusses the PMI Talent Triangle, including greater emphasis on the strategic and business knowledge aspect of project management

It seems that each release of the PMBOK Guide includes a bit more input from advocates for Agile methods. It’s good to see the Standard keeping pace with current notions of best practices.

New PM Articles for the Week of September 28 – October 4

Red BalloonNew project management articles published on the web during the week of September 28 – October 4. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Peter Gray summarizes the declining emotional maturity and resilience among college students, manifesting as an inability to handle setbacks and an escalating demand for services.
  • Esther Derby recently reflected on best practices for Agile, and selected seven to share with us. Note: these aren’t just Agile practices, but approaches to problem-solving.
  • Lisa McLeod analyzes the Volkswagen emission spoofing scandal, as a proactive deception driven by the CEO’s goals for the company, rather than adding customer value.

Established Methods

  • Todd Williams points out the pitfalls in organizational change management.
  • Philip Smith notes that that hard part, in these times of rapid change, is making change “stick.”
  • Allen Ruddock argues that the key to a successful project is communicating to the stakeholders what’s at stake for them – “What’s in it for me?”
  • Harry Hall lists nine ways to start a new project, in order to avoid being behind at the point of 15% completion.
  • Dhan Wa says we’re in the midst of a generational change in the practice of project management.
  • Bruce Harpham explains how to grow your internal network, and why you should.
  • Vivek Prakash reports on how the team that translated the PMBOK 5th Edition into Hindi set ground rules for handling disagreement, to meet their project schedule.
  • Glen Alleman explores the unmyths of project duration estimating.
  • Rich Maltzman makes the link between assumptions and risks, and then trots out an example from fish biology to illustrate his point.
  • John Goodpasture identifies some of the crucial innovations that arose from the American Civil War and World War II.

Agile Methods

  • Gil Broza gives us the “why” of working in iterations.
  • Mike Cohn wants to see the Scrum coaches and trainers shift their thinking, to grow the community rather than solidify their market share.
  • Jaap Dekkinga lists six levels of “doneness” that should be considered in Agile planning.
  • Jenny Brown notes some of the organizational challenges that can inhibit the adoption of Lean / Six Sigma methods.

Applied Leadership

  • Peter Saddington does a review of recent research into leadership and employee engagement, and finds evidence that we should be leading from the heart.
  • Art Petty reports on the lessons he learned from delivering two leadership workshops for the Alabama Jail Association. Leading in dangerous situations amplifies success and failure.
  • Tom McFarlin shares his professional approach to dealing with business relationships gone sour.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Elizabeth Harrin addresses questions about online project management training and the level of difficulty of the PMP exam. Just three minutes, safe for work.
  • Alena Kuzniatsova recommends a video from the Agile2015 Conference: a panel discussion on adopting Agile methods. Just over an hour, safe for work.
  • Jesse Fewell shares two brief videos, on #NoEstimates and virtual collaboration. A total of 13 minutes, safe for work.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Amany Nuseibeh on the need for project managers to live the PMI Code of Ethics. Just 17 minutes, safe for work.
  • Ruairi O’Donnellan shares a funny short video on eliminating risk. Less than two minutes, and safe for work as long as you use the enclosed stand.

Enjoy!