New PM Articles for the Week of August 1 – 7

New project management articles published on the web during the week of August 1 – 7. And this week’s video: Dennis Nally, Chairman of PricewaterhouseCoopers International Ltd. introduces the key findings from PwC’s 19th Annual Global CEO Survey. Less than six minutes, safe for work, and valuable for understanding your organization’s global operating environment.

Must read (or hear)!

  • Dave Prior interviews psychologist Krista Pierce and PM Carson Pierce on ways to deal with the pressure, angst, and anxiety that come with the PM job. Just 42 minutes, safe for work.
  • Elizabeth Harrin takes a moment to reflect on the stresses in her career and balance with her family life. Naturally, she has a plan.
  • Conner Forrest reports on actions that US Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson is taking to secure electronic voting systems in the 9,000 jurisdictions around the country.

Established Methods

  • John Goodpasture examines extreme risks: those for which the consequences are irreversible, and the impact is near-catastrophic. Fortunately, the probability is usually low.
  • Andy Jordan introduces the concepts of enterprise risk and portfolio risk distribution.
  • Harry Hall has assembled a list of diagnostic questions to ask when a project is troubled.
  • Helena Liu maps out the steps to take when a project starts to go wrong.
  • Ron Rosenhead points out one possible reason for “zombie projects:” a widespread management belief in inevitable success.
  • Binfire has just published their project management software buyer’s guide. It’s about the process of selecting what you need and makes no product recommendations.
  • Seth Godin reminds us what’s at stake when reviewing a contract.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers shares his curated reading list of Agile content for the week. Like this one, but focused on Agile methods.
  • Henny Portman reviews the second edition of Andrew Craddock’s “Agile Project Management and Scrum.”
  • Jeff Collins decomposes the introduction of Agile project management processes into existing organizations into five key steps.
  • Erich Orozco makes the case for not sharing people across teams.
  • Shuba Kathikeyan explains the Six Sigma DMAIC framework, certification sources, and the various Lean Six Sigma belts.

Applied Leadership

  • Joel Peterson, chairman of JetBlue, shares some suggestions for creating an organizational culture in which trust is secured by accountability.
  • John Carroll takes a Taoist look at servant leadership.
  • Nancy Settle-Murphy focuses on the end of the meeting: action assignments and next steps.
  • Gina Abudi completes parts four and five of her series on leading teams through Tuckman’s four stages of team development.
  • Jesse Lynn Stoner explains some of the causes for smart people to make dumb decisions.

Working and the Workplace

  • Johanna Rothman makes the case for hiring older workers. Hey, Dos Equis hired Jonathan Goldsmith to portray The Most Interesting Man in the World at age 67.
  • Margaret Meloni explains why a respect for organizational culture is necessary to prevent failure on a new job.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Niraj Kumar on the wide range of benefits to achieving the PMP credential. Just 31 minutes, safe for work.
  • Sarah White shares some insights on how you can maximize the impact of your resume, based on current recruitment practices and trends.
  • Art Petty: “Seeking next is the new state of normal for most of us in our careers and almost all of us in our businesses.”

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of July 4 – 10

New project management articles published on the web during the week of July 4 – 10. And this week’s video: Nick Bostrom’s TED talk on why machine learning will eventually require machines to have human values.

Must read!

  • Art Petty points to Volkswagen as example of what happens when an ethical lapse allows an organization to take a shortcut to success.
  • Daniel Newman looks into the business potential of chatbots and deep learning. If you manage projects with customer-facing capabilities, this stuff is in your near future.
  • Henny Portman describes the changes to the latest refresh of the Scrum Guide.

Established Methods

  • Nick Pisano makes an elegant case for trial and error, and always being in a yellow status.
  • Glen Alleman builds on the baseball metaphor in “Moneyball” to illustrate the need to manage software development, based on continuous analysis.
  • Harry Hall recounts a recent health scare to illustrate how to identify and deal with “sneaky” risks.
  • Mike Cohn recommends two simple actions that will help meeting participants be more mindful.
  • Isidora Roskic covers the basics of stakeholder management, from a team perspective.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews test preparation coach Julie DeSot on how to identify the correct answer in the PMP exam. Just 39 minutes, safe for work.

Agile Methods

  • Ryan Ripley interviews Ellen Gottesdiener on the importance of discovery as an enabler of delivery. Just 17 minutes, safe for work.
  • David Taber has some very specific recommendations for making Agile methods and traditional waterfall concepts work together.
  • Jeff Himmelright shares an interactive team training exercise in responding to unexpected contingencies, inspired by a scene in Apollo 13.
  • Aaron Smith summarizes the key findings in the recent Changepoint study, “Business Agility: Is It Easy to Pivot?”

Applied Leadership

  • Braden Kelly expounds on the value of thought leadership.
  • Apple Pineda explains why it takes a different approach to earn a Millenial’s loyalty.
  • Andy Jordan looks at some of the issues related to managing multiple generations in the workplace.
  • David Cotgreave notes that project risk management and handling requires a team where everyone’s opinion is considered – not just the leader’s.
  • Brad Egeland lists a few reasons why the human touch is still needed in project management – robots need not apply.

Working and the Workplace

  • Bertrand Duperrin describes the need to “consumerize” the workplace: “If they had to pay to rent the workplace, would they pay or look for another place?”
  • James Clear makes an interesting point: our environment imposes limits that we can’t easily change, no matter how motivated we are.
  • Lisette Sutherland interviews Michael Sliwinski on maximizing productivity by actively curating notifications and interruptions. Just 40 minutes, safe for work.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Nicole Nader, who makes the case for women attending a project management networking event. Just 21 minutes, safe for work.
  • Bruce Harpham interviews technical recruiter Ronald Yoon for insights on how recruiting works and what recruiters are looking for.
  • Susanne Madsen tells us how to demonstrate leadership, on the way to earning your next promotion.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of October 26 – November 1

Blue BalloonNew project management articles published on the web during the week of October 26 – November 1. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. And don’t forget: Thursday, November 5, is International Project Management Day.

Must Read!

  • Elizabeth Harrin summarizes the changes to the PMP exam, coming in January 2016. The changes reflect the findings of the most recent role delineation survey.
  • Peter Landau summarizes current trends in the online project management community, from International Project Management Day (November 5) to project leadership.
  • The October 2015 edition of Women Testers is now available, with articles on everything from mind mapping to stress and work, to the conclusion in their series about testing in the cloud. If you haven’t discovered this great online magazine, it’s time to catch up!

Established Methods

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Simona Fallavolita, who manages the PMP certification program, on the changes coming in January. Just 18 minutes, safe for work.
  • Pat Weaver tutors us on the differences between Critical Path Method (CPM) and Program Evaluation Review Technique (PERT).
  • Yasser Mahmud describes a methodology for assessing the maturity level of your PMO, and determining where to make improvements.
  • Mario Trentim has compiled a different sort of FAQ: Frequently Avoided Questions about PMO’s.
  • Harry Hall shows us how to complete a stakeholder register. Just four minutes, safe for work.
  • Ryan Ogilvie tells how to collect feedback, from deciding what you’ll do with it to closing the loop with the people who participated.
  • Linky van der Merwe takes the pulse of the Accidental Project Manager. Yup, still living…
  • Kenneth Darter examines the transition to production, or as he puts it,” The art of letting go.”

Agile Methods

  • Pawel Brodzinski suggests a Kanban alternative to limiting work in progress: find the next task by working from right to left, backward from “done.”
  • Jared Smith shares a web site designer’s point of view on budgeting and estimating.
  • Mike Cohn on doing without a design phase: “Designers need to think holistically but work incrementally.”
  • Tom McFarlin contemplates the social nature of a software development team.
  • Thomas Carney shares a nice history of Scrum, plus links to other articles, resources and reference material. Highly recommended!

Applied Leadership

  • Liane Davey reflects on the delicate balance between “confident, capable, and solution-oriented” and being approachable.
  • Sarah Hood explains why saying “no” can be good for your career. And it’s not just about opportunity cost.
  • Art Petty continues his “Next Act” series for us older folks, with an interesting charge: focus on your superpower, meaning what you do best.
  • Melanie Pinola lists ten “soft skills” and provide links to resources that will help you develop them.
  • William Guinan tell us how to manage negative emotions.
  • Richard Lepsinger summarizes recent research into generational differences.
  • Coert Vissar: “Research suggests that performance goals in education are less effective than mastery goals.”

Enjoy!