About the Weekly Round-up

Aside

I’ve been curating a weekly round-up of new content of interest to project managers since July 2010. With a couple of exceptions, I’ve managed to maintain that weekly schedule since I started. For all of you who read these lists and the linked content, and especially those who leave comments to the authors (we treasure the dialog), thanks.

I get inquiries from time to time from people who would like to add a post on their blog or LinkedIn or a corporate website to my weekly roundup. Naturally, I want to encourage new bloggers and give greater visibility to good content. To that end, let me explain how I curate the weekly list:

  • My publishing cycle is to post at 21:00 Sunday evening US Pacific Time (GMT-8), based on whatever appeared during the preceding seven days. We observe Daylight Savings Time on the same schedule as the rest of the US
  • It is difficult for me to stay current with the 200 or so sites I follow, so I use Feedly as my RSS reader. If your site doesn’t offer RSS, I probably won’t notice your latest post
  • If something is dated a day or two before the start of the week, but I believe it should be seen by my readers, I’ll link to it. Anything older than that is sand through the hourglass
  • I typically review 200 – 250 articles, podcasts, videos, and blog posts each week and link to the best of them, in my admittedly subjective opinion. YMMV
  • No one gets two links in the same week. Even if you wrote the two best articles of the week, I’m only going to send the audience toward one of them
  • I limit the list to 25 lines each week and group them by broad topic areas, to facilitate cherry-picking by the readers. Estimated reading time is based on roughly 250 words per minute
  • I include a link to a video or audio recording each week. Usually, it’s related to project management in some way, but I sometimes link to stuff that appeals to my off-beat sense of humor and musical tastes. Mea culpa

Note that some links may take you to a site that limits the number of page views if you aren’t a subscriber. If you’ve hit the limit but still want to read the article, it may be possible to access the URL by opening an incognito window. That said, if you are getting good information from a site, consider subscribing. And while you’re at it, support public broadcasting in your area.

I maintain a Blogroll on the main page of this site, listing links to sites I think my readers should be aware of. I remove links from the list when they appear to be inactive and add new links when it seems appropriate. Most of the sites on my Blogroll don’t link to this site, but it’s not intended to be a quid pro quo. That said, I believe in the power of community, and those who want to be read should be actively working to grow the community.

While I have in the past published articles by practitioners on this site, I’ve discontinued that practice. I don’t want post product placement puff pieces or publish “high-quality content written by [blah, blah].” I do book reviews if asked and occasionally post new practitioner articles on topics I haven’t already covered. If you have suggestions or feedback, please leave me a comment or drop me an Email.

As always, thanks for reading my stuff.

New PM Articles for the Week of October 1 – 7

New project management articles published on the web during the week of October 1 – 7. And this week’s video: Chris Forsberg makes the business case for a serverless architecture: namely, reducing the need for an Operations staff to nearly zero. 2 minutes, safe for work.

Also: Hussain Bandukwala has organized a PMO Virtual Summit, to be conducted October 16 – 18. The Summit will allow aspiring and first-time PMO leaders to hear from thought leaders like Bill Dow, Laura Barnard, and Andy Jordan. And it’s free—all you have to do is register. There’s also a free eBook with contributions from many of the speakers and Cornelius Fichtner did a quick interview podcast with Hussain. 3 minutes, safe for work.

Business Acumen and Strategy

  • Michelle Gelfand describes the problems arising from a merger of organizations with incompatible cultures. Case in point: Amazon and Whole Foods markets. 5 minutes to read.
  • Mike Murphy reports on the struggles (and closures) of several US-based robotics firms. Competition is building, although the market isn’t expanding very quickly. 2 minutes to read.
  • Uzma Barlaskar tells us how to develop a data-informed culture, rather than falling into a data-driven culture. The difference is more than semantics. 7 minutes to read.

Managing Projects

  • Elizabeth Harrin tutors us on programs (or programmes, in the UK), from the basics through three common types. 5 minutes to read.
  • Glenn Alleman gives us a clear explanation of the cone of uncertainty for projects and shares an extensive reading list. 3 minutes to read.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy shows us how to apply the Delphi Technique in a real project management example. 4 minutes to read.
  • Harry Hall persuades us to investigate the PMI-RMP risk management professional credential. 2 minutes to read.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Naomi Caietti on her new book, Transform Your Leadership: Getting unstuck and jumpstarting your career. Podcast, 27 minutes, safe for work.
  • Tim Runcie explains master projects in MS Project: what they are and when and how to use them. 6 minutes, safe for work.
  • Kris Hughes has rounded up 25 quotes that illustrate important aspects of project management. And none of those quoted are project managers! 8 minutes to read.

Managing Software Development

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his list of Agile content, from prescriptive practices (bad) to becoming more strategic (good) to why commitment cultures always win. 7 outbound links, 3 minutes to read.
  • Johanna Rothman begins a series on designing a product-oriented organization. Here are parts two, three, with part four coming soon. About 12 minutes to read these three.
  • Roman Pichler tells us how to establish an effective product strategy process, from vision to the product backlog. 5 minutes to read.
  • Erik Dietrich walks us through seven types of testing so we might spot the holes in our testing strategy. 5 minutes to read.
  • Alex Punnen presents a diagram of software quality in the shape of an iceberg because bug testing is only the most visible element. 13 minutes to read.
  • Tim Bunter summarizes three core principles from James Wickett’s webinar on DevSecOps, but a link is included if you want to hear for yourself. 5 minutes to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Alexander Maasik curates his weekly list of leadership articles, from implementing OKR to being too productive to running your business barefoot. 5 outbound links, 3 minutes to read.
  • George Jucan examines the ethical aspects of influencing (as opposed to manipulating) stakeholders. 6 minutes to read.
  • Payson Hall presents five principles for effective mentoring (and coaching). 2 minutes to read.

Research and Insights

  • MIT Technology Review reports on research that has created the first network of brain-to-brain thought exchange. Three people playing Tetris is just the beginning. 4 minutes to read.
  • Brian Krebs alerts us to a new trend in voice phishing: calls that credibly imitate contacts from your financial institution. 10 minutes to read.
  • Alison DeNisco Rayome on CareerBuilder’s new study: the US will add 8 million jobs over the next five years. Software developers and support specialists will be among the fastest-growing categories. 3 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Rebecca Knight explains how to cope with second-hand stress. 8 minutes to read.
  • Suzanne Lucas reports on a new law in Massachusetts that mandates employers who require a non-compete agreement to continue to pay you after you leave. 2 minutes to read.
  • Francisco Sáez recaps advice from Chip and Dan Heath on how we can change our own behavior. 3 minutes to read.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of September 17 – 23

New project management articles published on the web during the week of September 17 – 23. And this week’s video: an animation featuring the late Studs Terkel, as he ruminates on the comforting sound of the human voice, in a story about the machine-generated voice of the tram at the Atlanta airport. 3 minutes, safe for work.

Business Acumen and Strategy

  • Dave Gershgorn reports that some US Senators are asking whether AI algorithms could violate civil rights laws by perpetuating biases. 2 minutes to read.
  • Stephen Blyth notes that big data and machine learning won’t prevent the next financial crisis. The principal driver is irreducible uncertainty. 4 minutes to read.
  • Kasia Wezowski notes that while body language varies significantly across cultures, microexpressions are remarkably consistent. Just a minute to read but study the photos.

Managing Projects

  • Glen Alleman does a deep dive into Monte Carlo simulation and includes a truly massive list of references. 11 minutes to read.
  • John Goodpasture contrasts Monte Carlo simulations with PERT. 6 minutes to read.
  • Jory MacKay tutors us on stakeholders and how to identify and engage them. 11 minutes to read.
  • Elizabeth Harrin speaks out on allocating resources to tasks: “Availability is not a skill set!” 4 minutes to read.
  • Nenad Trajkovski addresses the question: do we need to assign a resource to a milestone task? If so, under what conditions? 3 minutes to read.
  • Johanna Rothman philosophizes on the differences between project work and product work. 3 minutes to read.

Managing Software Development

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his list of Agile content, from whiteboarding skills to Monte Carlo forecasting to a new survey. 7 outbound links, 3 minutes to read.
  • Mike Clayton presents a complete guide to the bewildering list of credentials available to Agile practitioners. 12 minutes to read.
  • Chee-Hong Hsia explains why architecture will emerge and evolve, even though you should take the time to start with a good design. 3 minutes to read.
  • Andy Makar describes three real-world Agile team challenges and recommends ways to deal with them. 5 minutes to read.
  • David Bernstein shares some pointers on pair and mob programming. Great minds don’t always think alike; sometimes they fill in each other’s gaps. 3 minutes to read.
  • Kristin Jackvony describes the critical elements to consider in localization testing. 4 minutes to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Alexander Maasik curates his list of leadership articles, from failing at your goals to protecting from human errors to choosing which advice to follow. 5 outbound links, 3 minutes to read.
  • Art Petty describes a presentation to senior managers that could have gone badly but benefitted from a calm response to strong objections. 6 minutes to read.
  • Pawel Brodzinski extols the virtues of flat organizations and distributed decision-making in the context of autonomy. 5 minutes to read.
  • Kerry Wills notes that there is a formula for transparency. Just a minute to read.

Research and Insights

  • Thomas Hornigold reports on MIT research: robotic arms that taught themselves to pick up objects the way people do. 5 minutes to read.
  • Mark Wilson cites research into career peaks—it seems that you can do your best work at any time in your professional career, and “hot streaks” are a real thing. 3 minutes to read.
  • Tom Van De Ven and Steven Van Dalen explain the impact of dedicated chips like the Bionic A12 in the new iPhone which are only engaged for specific tasks. Video, 6 minutes, safe for work.

Working and the Workplace

  • Dominic Price shares some vital signs that can help you determine whether your office culture is healthy. 3 minutes to read.
  • Maura Thomas examines the impact of Email on company culture. Some ground rules are needed! 5 minutes to read.
  • Geoffrey Morrison shares some advice on simple things to pack along on any business trip. 4 minutes to read.

Enjoy!