New PM Articles for the Week of January 19 – 25

Balloon BeyondNew project management articles published on the web during the week of January 19 – 25. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Seth Godin notes that professionals don’t add emotion to their communications to signify urgency.
  • H.O. Maycotte argues that the challenge in getting actionable information out of Big Data is being sure you’ve asked the right question.
  • Tim Wasserman identifies ten strategic trends in project execution that will define success in 2015.

PM Best Practices

  • Harry Hall lists ten ways in which the alignment between the customers and project team is gradually lost.
  • Dave Wakeman looks to Seattle and finds that the problem of a failed tunnel-boring machine has expanded well beyond the tunnel itself.
  • Rich Maltzman finds a colossal example of a failure to engage project stakeholders, right in his home town of Boston.
  • Nick Pisano references Borges’ “Library of Babel” in pointing out the challenges inherent in extracting meaning from collections of data with no underlying common design.
  • John Carroll asks, “If the stakeholders don’t actually care about the project or take any responsibility or interest in it, then why is the project being carried out?”
  • Mike Cohn explains why we should focus on benefits, rather than features.
  • Mike Donoghue argues for benefits management, as the key to keeping your project on track.
  • Ryan Ogilvie recommends a dozen ITSM blogs, for those of us with service management responsibilities.

Agile Methods

  • Neil Killick describes the role of Scrum Master in terms of responsibilities, behavior, and goals. An excellent, brief, but actionable explanation of a complex topic.
  • Niranjan Nerlige describes the role of Product Owner, as a list of interactions with the team and with the business.
  • John Goodpasture deconstructs Mike Cohn’s recently published definition of done.
  • Johanna Rothman considers alternatives to estimation, in the form of planning and re-planning.
  • Mike Griffiths reviews a few misconceptions about teamwork and collaboration.
  • Joanne Wortman talks about blending Agile methods in with the traditional.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Pam Welty and Joy Gumz on the use of Building Information Models for construction projects. Just 17 minutes, safe for work.
  • Elizabeth Harrin shares five quick tips for managing communications during a crisis. Just three minutes, safe for work.
  • Mark Phillipy talks about the importance of networking in developing your career. Just 26 minutes, safe for work.

Pot Pouri

  • Steven Levy extracts three lessons learned from the scandal surrounding under-inflated footballs in last weekend’s game between the Patriots and the Colts.
  • András Baneth gets to the essence of Reality Television Executive Chef Gordon Ramsay’s coaching method.
  • Don Kim points out that there are times when SMART goals can be dumb. Or at least, counter-productive.
  • Emanuele Passera considers the question: do we really need to be number one in our industry?
  • Lynda Bourne reflects on taking the time to reflect and think. And yes, that’s an example of recursion.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of January 12 – 18

Neighborhood BallonNew project management articles published on the web during the week of January 12 – 18. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Chuck Cohn points out three cloud-based collaboration tools that you might not think of as project management apps.
  • Chloe Green gives us an overview of what’s happening in cognitive computing, and how business will benefit from natural language processing.
  • Soma Bhattacharya interviews Samad Aidane on how neuroscience research is producing insights into human behavior with significant applications to project management.

PM Best Practices

  • Kailash Awati describes an alternative to the entity – relationship “search for objective truth” approach to data modeling, based on emergent design principles.
  • Glen Alleman notes that project management includes adjustments to the plan, throughout execution of the project.
  • John Goodpasture addresses the question of when we need to re-baseline our project schedule.
  • Elizabeth Harrin reviews Mark Phillip’s new book, “Reinventing Communication.” It sounds like his scientific approach might not be workable outside the laboratory.
  • Craig Brown created an interesting diagram of actions and feedback, starting with “Something bad happens.”
  • Andy Jordan cites a case study in what happens when a sponsor stifles a creative approach to delivery.
  • Phillip Smith contemplates Kaizen, which means more than just “Good change.”
  • Nick Pisano continues his multi-blog contemplation and conversation with me on finding a lingua franca for project management data.
  • Kerry Wills reminds us not to get too comfortable with our understanding of the issues and risks we see in our projects.
  • Pat Weaver outlines the challenges of comparing failed projects, or even conducting a root cause analysis.
  • Michael Lopp suggests that interruptions introduce a greater cost in lost productivity than the financial savings of an open office.
  • Ryan Ogilvie uses the metaphor of a sieve to talk about identifying the issues that should drive your service strategy.

Agile Methods

  • Johanna Rothman considers the relationship between optimism and success at implementing Agile methods.
  • Don Kim argues that Agile is based not on iteration, but recursion. You can say that again …
  • Vandana Roy gives us a detailed comparison of Scrum, Kanban, and Scrumban.
  • Shivakanth Velishala defines DevOps, and describes the three pillars that support continuous delivery.

Looking Ahead

  • Alistair Croll returns from Las Vegas (thanks for supporting our economy!) with insights on how wearables and the Internet of Things will rely on Big Data.
  • Lance Ulanoff reports on a personal robot, funded by Kickstarter, which may be under your tree for Christmas. The face resembles ice queen Elsa, with a new hairdo. Let it go …
  • Lyndsey Gilpin forecasts 2015 developments in renewable energy: generation, storage, and utilization, as well as changes in the business itself.
  • Christopher Romani looks at trends that will affect federal government acquisition and program management in 2015.
  • Kevin Korterud looks all the way out to 2025, to envision what PMO’s will be like ten years from now.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Frank Parth on the PM lessons learned from mega projects. Just 21 minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of January 5 – 11

SightseersNew project management articles published on the web during the week of January 5 – 11. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Maree Harris tells us how to be a coach, rather than a critic.
  • Amy Webb identifies the technology trends we can’t ignore in 2015.
  • Igal Hauer breaks down the actions that you should take to get your project team communicating and collaborating.

PM Best Practices

  • Steven Levy continues his series of posts on how to become the “five tools project manager,” explaining how to manage the Conditions of Satisfaction.
  • Michael Wood explains why program management is more than just managing a portfolio of related projects.
  • Glen Alleman gives us a quick recap of how our techniques for decision making in the presence of uncertainty have evolved, and how estimating is key to modern processes.
  • Johanna Rothman explains why the “indispensable employee” is a problem for the team, for management, and for the indispensable employee.
  • Lynda Bourne gives us a quick overview of the relationship between ethics, culture, rules, and governance.
  • Steve Jones explores a hypothetical: a person in a trusted role, who has started doing things differently (but not out of role), being detected by security analytics.
  • Terry Czigan reviews Margaret Lee’s new book, “Leading Virtual Project Teams.”
  • Susanne Madsen applies the metaphor of Yin and Yang to leading projects.
  • Margaret Meloni shares a nice graphic that summarizes how much project managers earn around the world.
  • Elizabeth Harrin has identified ten high-value project management conferences for us to consider attending in 2015.

Agile Methods

  • Derek Huether found a new product that lets you implement a green technique: reusable story cards!
  • Kelsey van Haaster gives us a primer on technical debt.
  • John Goodpasture explains why round negotiating tables are Agile.
  • Fang Wan consider the tenuous relationship between work and hours in estimates.
  • Bart Gerardi explains why velocity is not a figure of merit for the team; it is a planning metric, not an efficiency metric.
  • Mike Cohn even uses Scrum concepts to organize his own work. Probably not a daily stand-up, but other concepts map nicely.

Looking Ahead

  • Deven Parekh projects five trends related to Big Data. “Personalized medicine?” The pharmacist as barista – wow …
  • Scott Berkun tries to measure a trend: just how popular is remote work?
  • Don Kim brings together various indicators that predict the growth of the independent project manager, as part of the new normal.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Cesar Abeid interviews Susanne Madsen, on the power of project leadership. Just 56 minutes, safe for work.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Brian Irwin on facilitating Agile transformations using the Socratic method. Just 17 minutes, safe for work.
  • Mark Phillipy interviews Joseph Flahiff on his new book, “Being Agile in a Waterfall World.” Just 58 minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!