New PM Articles for the Week of May 22 – 28

New project management articles published on the web during the week of May 22 – 28. And this week’s video: The Allman Brothers Band, live at the Beacon Theatre in New York in 2003, performing “Ain’t Wastin’ Time No More.” Rest in peace, Gregg.

Must read!

  • Eric Garton makes the case for managing human capital as carefully and rigorously as we manage financial capital (which is cheaper and far more plentiful).
  • Robert Austin and Gary Pisano report on the growth of neurodiversity—actively recruiting candidates and accommodating employees with autism and similar conditions—in the corporate world.
  • Brandon Vigliarolo reports that stolen (and exploitable) data from every single Fortune 500 company has been found on the DarkNet.

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin summarizes the high-level changes coming in the Sixth Edition of the PMBOK. To be released in 3Q17, with exam changes in 1Q18.
  • Mike Donoghue identifies the characteristics that make a project complex, from technical to financial to … well, lots of stuff.
  • Lynda Bourne reviews the various biases and political influences that may apply when using reference classes to calculate management reserves.
  • Mike Clayton explains how the linear responsibility chart connects work breakdown structure to resources. Just six minutes, safe for work.
  • Leigh Espy defines, compares, and contrasts Waterfall and Agile.
  • The Clever PM makes the case for managing to data, as opposed to going with your gut or best guess.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from resilient teams to Agile at scale, to Reddit for product managers, to revisiting Deming’s 14 points.
  • Johanna Rothman starts a series of articles to define “Scaling Agile,” so we all have a common vocabulary to argue with.
  • Scott Sehlhorst gives his thoughts on achieving Agile at Scale, focusing on product management.
  • Rex Lester lists what he believes to the three most important Agile practices. Actually, these are applicable to just about everything from retail to medical care.
  • John Yorke notes the difference between a deliberate culture and a reflective culture. You can’t change the behavior (and culture) of the group simply by changing processes.
  • Bob Tarne reflects on the nature of estimates, as he waits for the airline to resolve an unspecified technical issue.

Applied Leadership

  • Harry Hall shares some techniques for improving your presentations.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Dr. Ginger Levin on embracing and exploiting change. Just 28 minutes, safe for work.
  • John Goodpasture notes that those driving change won’t get much support from the people who will benefit from the change because they have experienced it yet.
  • Seth Godin shares an insight: people resist change because they are rewarded for being competent, and change brings the risk of incompetence.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Brendan Toner reviews Hyper Plan, a two-dimensional task manager. Looks interesting, but no mobile option.
  • Lee Munroe gets us started on user testing as a component of UX research.
  • David Schlesinger gives us the high points on implementing encryption for network assets, including an allowable exception for executives and their admins.

Working and the Workplace

  • Maddy Osman shares her collected practices for maintaining productivity when working from home.
  • Lisette Sutherland talks with Ralph van Roosmalen about a way for remote teams to make decisions on the fly, using a shared document. Just 12 minutes, safe for work.
  • Art Petty suggests we think of career planning as an adventure into parts unknown.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of May 15 – 21

New project management articles published on the web during the week of May 15 – 21. And this week’s video: a short clip from “Mr. Blandings Build His Dream House,” where Cary Grant learns what happens when you make a decision when you don’t understand the alternatives and don’t bother to ask for clarification. Just a minute, safe for work, as long as you aren’t standing under the lintels.

Must read!

  • Bertrand Duperrin casts a critical eye on ROI, business cases, and lying with numbers.
  • Martin Seligman and John Tierney report on recent research that indicates the human mind is built to spend a lot of time considering the future—planning if you will.
  • Ian Whittington explores the history of managing complexity in projects from the Iron Bridge constructed in the 18th century to today’s software systems with emergent behaviors.

Established Methods

  • Glen Alleman explains measures of effectiveness and measures of performance as different points of view when examining a proposed product capability.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy digs into the details to tutor us on managing stakeholder engagement, in a strategic way.
  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews Kate Morris—convener of the PMI Australia Conference 2017 and practicing project manager—on managing a project manager’s conference.
  • Michel Dion outlines the project closure report.
  • Mike Clayton explains the Project Goal, a simple concept with profound implications. Just over two minutes, safe for work.
  • Harry Hall suggests some effective ways to improve our communication skills.
  • Elise Stevens shares lessons learned from alienating a key stakeholder in their first meeting.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his list of Agile content with a focus this week on team building, plus observations on the relationship between product discovery and product delivery.
  • Mike Cohn describe four possible career paths for the accomplished Scrum master.
  • Eli Woolery recaps five key insights gained from the inaugural Design Leadership Camp.
  • The Clever PM conducts one of his “ten questions” interviews with Paul Jackson—product manager, user-centered design practitioner, and newsletter publisher.
  • Renee Troughton describes the three patterns she has seen used for Agile delivery pipeline management at scale.

Applied Leadership

  • Jeff Collins lists a half-dozen qualities of strong project leaders.
  • Pat Weaver describes practical wisdom, “working out the right way to do the right thing in a particular circumstance.”
  • Krister Ungerboeck reflects on the toxic legacy of Steve Jobs and his “wretched asshole” leadership style.
  • Alex Puscasu describes Connie Gersick’s punctuated equilibrium model of group development. There’s more than just forming-storming-norming-performing-adjourning.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • John Goodpasture points out the complexity that is inevitably required to enable simplicity.
  • James Sanders shares the smart person’s guide to ransomware.
  • Paramita Ghosh lays out the currently expected use cases for artificial intelligence.

Working and the Workplace

  • Art Petty critiques IBM recent announcement that it is ending remote working arrangements.
  • Grace Windsor reminds us that until recently, leisure time was a marker of success. Then we decided that constant busyness indicated professionalism.
  • Tom McFarlin reflects on managing the tension between work and vacation. As my Dad used to say, “You don’t own the business; the business owns you.”

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of May 8 – 14

New project management articles published on the web during the week of May 8 – 14. And this week’s video: TED’s Chris Anderson interviews Elon Musk on his projects, from boring tunnels under Los Angeles to a permanent colony on Mars. Just 41 minutes, safe for work. The future is a work in progress.

Must read (or Hear)!

  • Chad Rigetti and Chris Dixon discuss the physical limits that apply to Moore’s Law and prospects for quantum computing in machine learning. New term: “neuromorphic processor.” Just 27 minutes, safe for work.
  • Yuval Noah Harari looks out to 2050 when most jobs that exist today will have disappeared, and the “useless” class will be a far greater challenge than the working class.
  • Bertrand Duperrin updates on the end of search (as we know it) and the rise of non-benevolent assistance (“Let me help you select a product from our sponsors.”).

Established Methods

  • Harry Hall identifies five actions we can take to improve project communication
  • Charmaine Karunaratne suggests strategies and tactics for managing a project team distributed around the globe.
  • Colin Ellis catalogs a few ways to really suck at project management.
  • Geraldine O’Reilly steps us through the creation of a RACI matrix, and points out a few other variations, like CAIRO and RACI-VS.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy suggests a relatively simple project risk management plan.
  • John Goodpasture addresses the definition and handling of extreme risks.
  • Rich Maltzman notes the risk management implications of a recent discovery that climate change is releasing long-frozen viruses and bacteria into the water supply.
  • Glen Alleman recommends “The Death of Expertise,” by Tom Nichols. The Age of Enlightenment is but a dim memory …

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of all things Agile, from refactoring Agile to schizophrenic dichotomies in Agile frameworks to dual track development.
  • Leigh Espy delivers an excellent summary of Agile principles and philosophy, and a short overview of the leading methods. Highly recommended for project managers looking for a point of entry.
  • Dave Prior interviews John Le Drew, host of The Agile Path on his approach to the craft of podcasting. Just 46 minutes, safe for work.
  • The Clever PM presents a product manager’s guide to technical debt.
  • Bart Gerardi introduces voting using the Fist of Five. It only sounds like a Kung Fu movie.

Applied Leadership

  • Art Petty provides some guidance for managers on dealing with a toxic employee.
  • Mike Clayton provides action plans for dealing with each of six different types of difficult project sponsors.
  • Coert Visser notes that positive stereotypes are just as depersonalizing as negative stereotypes and thus should not be used as a compliment.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Thomas Fox-Brewster reports on the quick action by a malware researcher which shut down Friday’s WannaCry ransomware. Still running XP on some device? You’ll surely get another opportunity to regret it.
  • Jennifer Zaino catches us up on recent attempts to develop standards for the Internet of Things, notably a new W3C working group and services based on Linked Data.
  • Nir Eyal shares an excerpt from Nathalie Nahai’s new book, “Webs of Influence: The psychology of online persuasion.” Specifically, this excerpt is about persuasive video.

Working and the Workplace

  • Michael Lopp describes his daily morning calendar scrub. “If unscheduled time is zero, die a little inside.”
  • My Nguyen outlines what we need to know about ergonomics to stay healthy while riding a desk all day. Desk, monitor, keyboard, mouse, chair, and regular movement – all important!
  • Sara McCord considers the pros and cons of deleting LinkedIn connections you don’t actually know.

Enjoy!