New PM Articles for the Week of July 13 – 19

Over DinnerNew project management articles published on the web during the week of July 13 – 19. Pull up a chair and let’s talk. Our theme this week is applied leadership. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Jeff Furman on the second edition of “The Project Management Answer Book.” Just 35 minutes, safe for work, and well worth your time.
  • Paul Ritchie presents evidence that hiring managers are putting more emphasis on leadership, strategy, and business skills when hiring PM’s.
  • Steven Levy recounts the story of a tour boat operator who had to intervene when one of his guests decided to swim with the alligators. Are you this cool when the unexpected happens?

PM Best Practices

  • Carol Dekker outlines the key steps to a better software development performance measurement program.
  • Michel Dion expounds on monitoring, measuring, and reporting as the core of project governance.
  • Glen Alleman adds more diagrams to his ongoing explanation of the role of estimating in economic analysis.
  • Marco Behler takes a practical approach to improving the accuracy software development estimates.
  • Harry Hall assembled thirty(!) risk evaluation principles while preparing to teach a course on PMI’s Practice Standard for Project Risk Management.
  • John Goodpasture summarizes Tim van Gelder’s description of the elements of critical thinking.
  • Dave Wakeman covers three keys to achieving organizational alignment for your project.
  • Braden Kelly continues his series on applying the Six Sigma DMAIC methodology to drive innovation.
  • Ryan Ogilvie reports from the Calgary Stampede, where not everyone was stampeding toward ITIL. Yes, the conversation was over beer …
  • Kerry Wills follow up on his eight fundamental guiding principles for managing programs with an analysis of what happens when one is missing.
  • Allen Ruddock argues that communications is a key PMO responsibility.
  • Gina Abudi notes that key roles should be defined and people assigned to them, throughout the project.
  • Bruce Harpham continues his series on finding a summer project at work.
  • Joe Caprara thinks it’s a good thing to earn the PMP credential. Just don’t make it the basis for any of your claims.

Agile Methods

  • Michael Dubakov proposes the Minimum Action Energy Principle in user interface design. Yes, physics matters even to software engineers.
  • Johanna Rothman describes the responsibilities commonly assigned to three common roles: product manager, product owner, and business analyst.
  • Kyle Viele experiments with the Candle Problem, as described by Dan Pink, to demonstrate that diverse teams get better results than homogeneous teams.
  • Henny Portman reviews “The Lean Startup,” by Eric Ries. Did you know that this book influenced the development of the PRINCE2 Agile Framework?

 Pot Pouri

  • Elizabeth Harrin lists 15 ways to celebrate success with your team.
  • Mike Cohn encourages us to take a moment to celebrate with our team, even if it’s just by exchanging paper plates.
  • Adam Shostok takes umbrage with the “word nerds.”
  • Seth Godin: “An amateur memorizes. A professional looks for metaphors.”

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of July 6 – 12

Balloon SunriseNew project management articles published on the web during the week of July 6 – 12. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Our theme this week is taking a skeptical look at extraordinary claims. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Kailash Awati takes a critical look at knowledge work and the flimsy basis for claims of expertise.
  • John Goodpasture summarizes a few revolutionary ideas for the 21st century technocrat organization, despite his misgivings.
  • Bruce Benson compares the fault in his GPS that said he ran a four-minute mile with the claims made by methodology advocates.

PM Best Practices

  • Harry Hall reviews some strategies for dealing with the process by which sub-par resources get assigned to our projects.
  • Jim Anderson gives us some pointers on how to take control of a negotiation.
  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews Mark Woeppel on his new book, Visual Project Management.
  • Glen Alleman outlines the three major strategic themes underlying most IT projects.
  • Allen Ruddock suggests that the PMO can have an important role in maintaining stakeholder engagement.
  • Dan Patterson advocates for risk analysis as part of the process of green lighting a new project.
  • Bruce Harpham bullet points the characteristics of a good summer project. The kind you choose for yourself, of course!
  • Margaret Meloni composes an open letter to project team members.
  • Toby Elwin drives home the need to understand the action objective before communicating.
  • Ryan Ogilvie lists a few specious claims to avoid when pitching change. My favorite: “No testing is really needed.” Yup, that’s why we have production …
  • Braden Kelly starts a series on using Six Sigma / DMAIC to drive innovation.

Agile Methods

  • Johanna Rothman has gathered some insights for program-level product owners, and shares three of them with us.
  • Henrico Dolfing shares his lessons learned from using Scrum on an actuarial modeling project.
  • Nada Aldahleh has some suggestions for improving Scrum.

 Podcasts and Videos

  • Cesar Abeid interviews author, podcaster, and strategic business coach Gene Hammett on leaving the corporate world and learning from failure. Just 55 minutes, safe for work.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews project management coach and mentor Jeff Furman on his approach. Just 30 minutes, safe for work.
  • William McKnight presents his TED talk on information as the next natural resource. Well, maybe not natural, but definitely a resource. Just 15 minutes, safe for work.

Outside the Lines

  • Peter Saddington shares a two minute video, ”Did I Get the Job?” Funny, not safe for work, but there’s nothing good on TV, so why not?
  • Seth Godin relates an interesting technique for getting an audience involved.
  • Vivek Prakash describes what he claims is, “The only technique that resolves conflicts.”

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of June 21 – 28

Sydney HarborNew project management articles published on the web during the week of June 21 – 28. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Tushnar Patel pulls a few key statistics from a recent survey of project portfolio managers by Innotas.
  • Shim Marom offers a few insights from his own experience on the clash of Agile and Waterfall approaches in organizations trying to make both work.
  • Johanna Rothman examines some unrealistic expectations that managers have about what their people “should” do.

PM Best Practices

  • Elizabeth Harrin reviews Mario Trentim’s new book, “Managing Stakeholders as Clients.”
  • Glen Alleman recommends a book by Mark Maier and Eberhardt Rechtin, “The Art of Systems Architecting.”
  • Kailash Awati invokes Joseph Heller and Gregory Bateson’s double-bind theory in examining paradoxes at work.
  • John Goodpasture repeats advice from Dorie Clark on preparing for “networking events.”
  • Aaron Smith lists some of the key findings of the fourth annual benchmarking survey of PMO’s by ESI International
  • Ryan Ogilvie considers ways in which we can improve problem management, even when we’re not the problem manager.

Agile Methods

  • Pawel Brodzinski notes the de-motivating effects of hierarchy-driven organization structures. Finding yourself at the bottom of a tall org chart is a definite downer.
  • Mike Cohn discounts the value of a complicated story hierarchy.
  • Joel Bancroft-Connors and his gorilla-conscience, Hogarth, look at the possibility that the Pareto Principle might begin to explain resistance to Agile methods.
  • Mike Stuedeman identifies three common reasons organizations struggle with Scum and Agile.
  • Tom McFarlin shares how his approach to providing estimates for custom software development has evolved.

 

Outside the Lines

  • Bruce Benson examines the Internal Revenue Service and U.S. Air Force for lessons on the difference between a noble purpose and effectiveness.
  • Wanda Curlee see opportunities for project managers in the ever-evolving Internet of Things.
  • Tony Sarris, on the other hand, finds HAL enabled by the Internet of Things. I don’t relish the prospect of having conversations with the coaster under my beer.
  • Matthew Squair finds a moment of Zen in the news that hospital drug pumps can be hacked. Hannibal before the gates, indeed …

 

Enjoy!