New PM Articles for the Week of January 4 – 10

New project management articles published on the web during the week of January 4 – 10. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Bruce Harpham shares part of his reading list from the last year, and urges us to make reading a key part of our professional development program in 2016.
  • Bob Tarne has been reading “Change by Design,” by Tim Brown. He’s found some interesting insights on the nature of constraints: feasibility, viability, and desirability.
  • Gurjeet Singh gives us some background on machine learning: what it is, what it can do, and what we should expect for the next few years.

Established Methods

  • Michel Dion notes that not every project is an IT project, even when they involve software.
  • Deb Schaffer starts every project with the same question: “What does project success look like?”
  • Johanna Rothman questions the value of certifications and credentials in hiring.
  • Steve Olson extracts project management insights from his long experience in contract management.
  • Brad Rach points out a source of risk we might not have considered: the project manager.
  • Nancy Settle-Murphy shares some techniques for establishing a compelling presence in conference calls, where they can’t see your body language.
  • Mario Trentim has prepared a list of questions to ask for those organizations that want to start a PMO.
  • Tim Wasserman looks into the causes and effects of the gap between organizational strategy and executing on that strategy.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Peter Monkhouse on preventing failure by communicating based on how the project fits into the organization strategy. Just 16 minutes, safe for work.

Agile Methods

  • The Clever PM reviews the twelve guiding principles listed in the Agile Manifesto.
  • Jonathan Schneider presents two scenarios for Agile transformation: one based on compliance, and one based on empowering teams in a pilot.
  • John Gilroy interviews Jesse Fewell on how Agile methods are being adopted by U.S. federal government agencies. Just 42 minutes, safe for work.
  • Tom McFarlin recommends a pragmatic approach: don’t over-engineer your solutions.
  • Angela Wick brings a business analyst’s eye to Agile methods.

Applied Leadership

  • Gurpreet Singh presents an interesting metaphor for leadership: The Listening Tree.
  • Mike Clayton tutors us on influence and persuasion, including a list of persuasion tactics from his book, “How to Influence in Any Situation.”
  • Art Petty suggests we start a business revolution – by fighting corporate bureaucracy to eliminate obstacles.
  • Susanne Madsen coaches us on how to handle a demanding workload, by sharing it.
  • Lynda Bourne points out the signs that a project manager is on the path to becoming a great team leader.

Trends and the New Year

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of December 21 – 27

SightseersNew project management articles published on the web during the week of December 21 – 27. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Rich Maltzman reports on some notable progress in achieving a shift to sustainability, by multi-national corporations. Start 2016 with green eyes!
  • Matthew Heusser interviews Tara Nicholson on IT program and project management at Scripps Network, home of HGTV and other lifestyle media outlets. Ask This Old House is Agile?
  • Penelope Trunk summarizes research into negotiating strategies. Lots of links, so be prepared to Pocket them for later. You use Pocket, right?

Established Methods

  • Bruce Harpham interviews Joanne Hohenadel, senior project manager at University Health Network in Toronto. They won the 2015 PMI Award for Project Excellence – North America.
  • Dave Prior interviews Shane Hastie, John D. Cook, and Troy Magennis on a range of Agile and project management topics. Just 42 minutes, safe for work.
  • Wanda Curlee uses concentric circle diagrams to illustrate a portfolio management decision. Excellent – simple graphics that clearly show a complex comparison!
  • Glen Alleman: “Like value, waste is rarely defined by those performing the work. It’s defined by those paying for the work.”
  • Jeff Collins provides executive-level input to the activity of reducing risk to projects.
  • Mark Lukens makes the case for incremental improvements as less destabilizing than huge, sweeping initiatives.
  • Robert Charette shares a lesson learned from pulling together a report on a decade’s worth of failed projects: We don’t do post-mortems very well.
  • Ryan Ogilvie uses an Indiana Jones metaphor to point out that root cause analysis isn’t all that’s required to get to a solution.
  • Thomas Carney covers the state of the art in cross-browser testing.

Agile Methods

  • Dmitri Khanine continues his series on moving from gathering requirements to user experience engineering.
  • Mike Griffiths not only updated his PMI-ACP Exam Prep book, he updated the sample test questions. Here, he shares 20 of them.
  • Johanna Rothman is asking for reader input before updating her book, “Manage Your Project Portfolio: Increase your capacity and finish more projects.”
  • Judith Mary Khan lists nearly two dozen things to not do when moving to Agile methods.
  • Vishal Venkatesan outlines how they scaled Agile at Spotify.
  • Renee, Tony, and Craig get together for a wide-ranging discussion on Agile in Australia, Etsy, Feedly, Sanjiv Augustine’s new book, and much more. Just over an hour, safe for work.

Applied Leadership

  • Art Petty reminds us that results are not directly related to effort.
  • Seth Godin notes that exceptional results come from abandoning the need for the approval of our peers. Try not to think of Donald Trump when you read that …
  • Michael Lopp opens up the draft “Management Glossary” for the forthcoming third edition of Managing Humans.
  • Bertrand Duperrin opens a discussion of employee experience, the consumerization of worklife, engagement, and productivity. Yes, “the employee as a customer” is a thing.
  • Betcher Robert says that we can reduce the number of code defects by 50%, by holding developers and the business accountable.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of November 23 – 29

Yellow BalloonNew project management articles published on the web during the week of November 23 – 29. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Tom McFarlin recalls Dwight D. Eisenhower’s clarification on the difference between important and urgent. Knowing the difference will help you prioritize your tasks.
  • Bertrand Duperrin points out an interesting development reflected in Jane McConnell’s annual study: your intranet and your organization are the two sides of a single reality.
  • Dick Weisinger reports on a Gartner Group estimate that 2018, half of all ethics violations will arise from improper use of Big Data.

Established Methods

  • Nick Pisano begins a series describing a general theory of projects as complex adaptive systems, based on systems theory.
  • Henny Portman reviews the second edition of “Project Sponsorship,” by Randall Englund and Alfonso Bucero, from PMI.
  • Mike Clayton explains how to lead your project sponsor. Yes, you have to lead up, or you’ll let them down.
  • Todd Williams provides a top-level look at organization change models, noting that they don’t all address the same things.
  • Thomas Carney describes the trade-offs of push processes versus pull process in issue management.
  • Harry Hall explains how to improve the quality of your risk statements.
  • Matthew Squair identifies a problem with the way that the Federal Aviation Administration defines risk severity classifications.
  • Sarah Hood tells how to include risk management into communications planning.
  • Kevin Coleman notes that everything from social media to business participation in development has raised the stakes for proper testing.
  • John Goodpasture points out an inescapable fact: most projects run on “little data,” which is mostly tracked in Excel.
  • Glen Alleman differentiates between a system and the products that comprise or deploy the system. Important distinctions for estimating cost and schedule!

Agile Methods

  • Mike Griffiths looks at managing program benefits from an Agile perspective.
  • Derek Huether uses the experience of renewing his driver’s license to illustrate two important Lean metrics: Lead Time and Cycle Time.
  • Dele Oluwole suggests pairings of Scrum, XP, DSDM, and Lean. Sort of an Agile sommelier…

Applied Leadership

  • Elizabeth Harrin expounds on that most practical skill: leadership.
  • Bruce Harpham reflects on his positive experience as an active member of Toastmasters.
  • Art Petty describes the behavior of a negative manager type he calls the “hyper-rooster.” And the cure involves more than just switching to decaf.
  • Liane Davey concludes her analysis of what’s missing from executive teams, and how to bridge the gap.
  • Ravindra Wankar offers some advice for Millenial project managers.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Frank Saladis on his 2015 PMI Global Congress presentation, ”The Indispensable Project Manager.” Just 21 minutes, safe for work.
  • Allen Ruddock illustrates how to analyze a business problem to ensure you are doing the right project. Just ten minutes, safe for work.
  • Margaret Meloni explains how to diffuse anger. Just two minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!