New PM Articles for the Week of January 29 – February 4

New project management articles published on the web during the week of January 29 – February 4. And this week’s video: Personal Kanban author Jim Benson introduces a new series of videos—The Agile Heretic. “We’ve gone from Death Marches to Death Sprints.” Sounds interesting! 7 minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Tsedal Neeley expounds on swift trust, passable trust, direct knowledge, reflected knowledge, and how we build trust with colleagues we rarely see. 5 minutes to read.
  • Jesse Lynn Stoner explains how to make an effective apology and increase trust. 3 minutes to read.
  • Henny Portman reviews Patrick Lencioni’s The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, a classic work on getting to collaboration by beginning with creating trust. 3 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • Balloon LandingHarry Hall explains the what, why, and when of evaluating project risks. 3 minutes to read.
  • John Goodpasture unpacks the concept of coupling to explain why, even in an Agile approach, dependencies can be reduced with a proper temporary architecture. 2 minutes to read.
  • Laura Barnard notes that Agile and PMO are not mutually exclusive concepts. In fact, they can complement each other. 7 minutes to read.
  • Elizabeth Harrin curates her list of recommended project management certification training courses, for PMI and PRINCE2 certifications. 5 minutes to read, 6 outbound links.
  • Bonnie Biafore and John Riopel have some suggestions for building your organization’s methodology. 3 minutes to read.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Marisa Silva on positioning the PMO to deliver impactful value. Podcast, 18 minutes, safe for work.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly Agile roundup, from useless Agile metrics to big room planning, to the case for fewer product managers. 3 minutes to read, 7 outbound links.
  • Dan North coins a new term: SWARMing, Scaling Without a Religious Methodology. 17 minutes to read.
  • Kiron Bondale looks at the leadership problem of Agile adoption—organizational adoption of an agile mindset. 2 minutes to read.
  • Tom Cagley has collected a few metrics that can determine if our objectives in adopting agile methods are being met. 4 minutes to read.
  • Mike Clayton explains Kanban, from its roots in Toyota’s JIT manufacturing system to adoption by the Agile movement. Video, 6 minutes to watch; safe for work.
  • Paul Merrill explains why you won’t be able to convert your entire testing team to use automated test tools. 6 minutes to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Balloon Over The RoofArt Petty recaps an anecdote that illustrates how to handle an attack on your credibility during a meeting. 5 minutes to read.
  • Bob Tarne notes that psychological safety—the perceived ability to push back on a management request—is created by managers, not team members. 2 minutes to read.
  • Doug Thorpe receives an Email from a former colleague that was “less than flattering,” and notes that leaders can’t win over everyone. 4 minutes to read.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Jeff Furman tips his hat to Mary Ann Jensen, the neglected co-author of the update to Dr. Bruce Tuckman’s Stages of Team Development Dr. Jensen is now a psychologist in private practice. 2 minutes to read.
  • Amy Hamilton recommends some small behavior changes that might help you to avoid a cybersecurity breach—at home, at work, and en route. 3 minutes to read.
  • Julian Strachan says that it’s OK to be techno-skeptical—after all, a technology does not control how it is used. 4 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Eamonn McGuinness describes a model for handling those little interruptions and distractions that pop up throughout the day. A minute to read, or a video at 3 minutes; safe for work.
  • Leigh Espy shares her tips for getting things done in a timeframe a little closer to your original estimate. 3 minutes to read.
  • John Yorke notes numerous studies that say there is an inverse relationship between hours worked and productivity. 8 minutes to read.
  • Nils Salzgeber argues that the key to higher productivity is to manage your energy, rather than your time. 19 minutes to read.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of January 8 – 14

New project management articles published on the web during the week of January 8 – 14. And this week’s video: Vijay Pande explains drug development and healthcare from an engineering perspective, including “technical debt” and other things that don’t sound like biology. 24 minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Nancy Settle-Murphy talks up the value of civilized disagreement and explains how to pursue it. 6 minutes to read.
  • Henny Portman reviews The Startup Way—How Entrepreneurial Management Transforms Culture and Drives Growth, Eric Ries’s follow-up to The Lean Startup. 5 minutes to read.
  • The January 2018 edition of the Women Testers Magazine is now available. Not just for or by women! 4 minutes to scan the overview, but download and read the whole thing.

Established Methods

  • John Owen explains schedule risk analysis, including some excellent examples. 6 minutes to read.
  • Jeff Collins explores some of the benefits of a reliable project schedule. 5 minutes to read.
  • Elizabeth Harrin lists five ways to get tasks out of your inbox and make them trackable actions. 6 minutes to read.
  • Mike Clayton tutors us on the stage gate process and why it adds project management value. 12 minutes to read.
  • Leigh Espy shares a single-page format for a project status report. 6 minutes to read.
  • Billy Guinan describes ways to cultivate a successful project management culture. 6 minutes to read.
  • Lew Sauder tells us what a PMO does to add value. 4 minutes to read.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from troubled Agile transitions to building trust to what product strategy concepts are currently en vogue. 6 outbound links, 2 minutes to scan.
  • Will Fanguy curates the weekly design news roundup, with 5 outbound links. 2 minutes to scan.
  • Martin Eriksson tabulates ten product management articles you should have read in 2017. 1o outbound links, 7 minutes to read.
  • John Cutler notes that Agile done right is actually continuous design. 4 minutes to read.
  • Glen Alleman debunks some of the balderdash being passed around as verities. 5 minutes to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Bruce Benson notes that just because an unethical behavior seems to have become common does not mean it should be accepted. 3 minutes to read.
  • Art Petty explains how to “survive to play another day” when reporting to a dictator-manager. 4 minutes to read.
  • Kerry Wills lists some examples of meeting invitations and other communications that don’t make expectations clear and actionable. 2 minutes to read.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Nilay Patel went to CES and realized just how much the tech industry assumes that consumers understand—mind the gap! 4 minutes to read.
  • Kiron Bondale advocates the use of a Kanban to manage your personal development resolutions for 2018. OK, call it a plan, then. 3 minutes to read.
  • David Lavenda updates our expectations for AI delivering improved productivity and engagement in the coming year. 4 minutes to read.
  • Kritika Pandey lists some hacks and tools for team collaboration and productivity. 4 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Martin De Wulf does a deep dive into the stress of remote working. 12 minutes to read.
  • Seth Godin points out the keys to good customer service are in the first 60 seconds of the encounter. 2 minutes to read.
  • Tommy Goodwin notes that the US Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics has added “Project Management Specialist” to its Standard Occupational Classification and explains why it’s a big deal. 3 minutes to read.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of December 11 – 17

New project management articles published on the web during the week of December 11 – 17. And this week’s video: Jingle Bells, for all of you who never learned to play an actual musical instrument. 2 minutes, safe for work, but you’ll have to replay it for everyone within earshot.

Must read!

  • Kio Stark explains how to exit a conversation without being a jerk. 4 minutes to read.
  • Michael Lopp describes his inner monologue as an introvert preparing and delivering the next sentence. Insightful enough to be discomforting. 3 minutes to read.
  • Julie Beck interviews N.J. Enfield on how the tiny pauses and filler words enable us to keep the conversation flowing. So “Umm” has a purpose? Good to know. 8 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin lists the project management trends that she believes will dominate the profession in 2018 and beyond. 5 minutes to read.
  • Darragh Broderick points to five collaboration trends we’ll see in project management in 2018. 4 minutes to read.
  • Leigh Espy tutors us on creating an agenda for a project status meeting.
  • Ryan Ogilvie notes that problem management is like watering plants—you can’t overcome neglect quickly. 3 minutes to read.
  • Kerry Wills observes a possible trend, toward “lightweight” PMO’s. Just a minute or so to read.
  • Renee Adair recounts an anecdote that illustrates the consequences of a “failure to communicate” when lots of channels are involved. 5 minutes to read.
  • Brendan Toner concludes his short series on how to deliver projects on time. 6 minutes to read.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his Agile content list, from Vasco Duarte’s 20 top Agile blogs to hiring wisdom from a young Steve Jobs to how Sales adds value to a product roadmap. 7 outbound links, 2 minutes to scan.
  • Tom Cagley interviews Michael Harris on the business value of software—how to recognize it and how to create it. Podcast, 43 minutes.
  • John Goodpasture recaps Steve McConnell’s video presentation on managing technical debt in financial terms, which make more sense to the business. 2 minutes for the recap, just over an hour for the video.
  • Glen Alleman addresses a weak spot in Agile development processes at many organizations: separation of concerns. 7 minutes to read.
  • Abhijeet Verma tutors us on Spikes, as a tool for addressing uncertainties in stories or epics.

Applied Leadership

  • Johanna Rothman continues her series on building respect in organizations, rather than families. Here are parts four and five. 3 to 4 minutes each.
  • Suzanne Lucas uses Queen Elizabeth as an example of how a true leader responds to criticism. 3 minutes to read.
  • Seth Godin suggests we invest in making our gut smarter. 1 minute to read.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Stuart Firestein interviews professional poker layer Annie Duke on the Resulting Fallacy—judging the decision on the result—and how it negatively impacts our ability to refine our decision-making process. 8 minutes to read.
  • Keith Foote recaps the history of Big Data, beginning in the 17th century(!). 7 minutes to read.
  • Will Fanguy tutors us on prototyping. 4 minutes to read.
  • Bertrand Duperrin looks at the implementation concerns that organizations reasonably should have about HR Chatbots. 3 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Travis Bradberry provides some ideas on how to structure your working day between “work” and “breaks” to maximize your actual productivity. 4 minutes to read.
  • Scott Berkun identifies the top five reasons why remote workers don’t succeed. 4 minutes to read.
  • Kat Boogaard lists seven questions to ask in an informational interview when thinking about a career change. 4 minutes to read.

Enjoy!