New PM Articles for the Week of January 12 – 18

Neighborhood BallonNew project management articles published on the web during the week of January 12 – 18. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Chuck Cohn points out three cloud-based collaboration tools that you might not think of as project management apps.
  • Chloe Green gives us an overview of what’s happening in cognitive computing, and how business will benefit from natural language processing.
  • Soma Bhattacharya interviews Samad Aidane on how neuroscience research is producing insights into human behavior with significant applications to project management.

PM Best Practices

  • Kailash Awati describes an alternative to the entity – relationship “search for objective truth” approach to data modeling, based on emergent design principles.
  • Glen Alleman notes that project management includes adjustments to the plan, throughout execution of the project.
  • John Goodpasture addresses the question of when we need to re-baseline our project schedule.
  • Elizabeth Harrin reviews Mark Phillip’s new book, “Reinventing Communication.” It sounds like his scientific approach might not be workable outside the laboratory.
  • Craig Brown created an interesting diagram of actions and feedback, starting with “Something bad happens.”
  • Andy Jordan cites a case study in what happens when a sponsor stifles a creative approach to delivery.
  • Phillip Smith contemplates Kaizen, which means more than just “Good change.”
  • Nick Pisano continues his multi-blog contemplation and conversation with me on finding a lingua franca for project management data.
  • Kerry Wills reminds us not to get too comfortable with our understanding of the issues and risks we see in our projects.
  • Pat Weaver outlines the challenges of comparing failed projects, or even conducting a root cause analysis.
  • Michael Lopp suggests that interruptions introduce a greater cost in lost productivity than the financial savings of an open office.
  • Ryan Ogilvie uses the metaphor of a sieve to talk about identifying the issues that should drive your service strategy.

Agile Methods

  • Johanna Rothman considers the relationship between optimism and success at implementing Agile methods.
  • Don Kim argues that Agile is based not on iteration, but recursion. You can say that again …
  • Vandana Roy gives us a detailed comparison of Scrum, Kanban, and Scrumban.
  • Shivakanth Velishala defines DevOps, and describes the three pillars that support continuous delivery.

Looking Ahead

  • Alistair Croll returns from Las Vegas (thanks for supporting our economy!) with insights on how wearables and the Internet of Things will rely on Big Data.
  • Lance Ulanoff reports on a personal robot, funded by Kickstarter, which may be under your tree for Christmas. The face resembles ice queen Elsa, with a new hairdo. Let it go …
  • Lyndsey Gilpin forecasts 2015 developments in renewable energy: generation, storage, and utilization, as well as changes in the business itself.
  • Christopher Romani looks at trends that will affect federal government acquisition and program management in 2015.
  • Kevin Korterud looks all the way out to 2025, to envision what PMO’s will be like ten years from now.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Frank Parth on the PM lessons learned from mega projects. Just 21 minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!

New Post at AITS: Toward a Better Source of Project Management Data

AITSBloggingAllianceAITS recently published my new post, where I call for a movement to take more modern approaches to sharing and analyzing project data among projects. In it, I trace the evolution of end user management data processing from the late 1950’s through the present day. I contend that our end user technology has evolved past a need for normalized, standardized data structures, and that we need to think in terms of data exchange, rather than data repositories.

You can read the article here. Most of the folks who visit this site spend a lot of time creating, analyzing and sharing project data with governance boards, portfolio managers, and executives, so I’m sure the subject has come up at some time. Please leave a comment at the article, if you want to share your thoughts.

New PM Articles for the Week of January 5 – 11

SightseersNew project management articles published on the web during the week of January 5 – 11. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Maree Harris tells us how to be a coach, rather than a critic.
  • Amy Webb identifies the technology trends we can’t ignore in 2015.
  • Igal Hauer breaks down the actions that you should take to get your project team communicating and collaborating.

PM Best Practices

  • Steven Levy continues his series of posts on how to become the “five tools project manager,” explaining how to manage the Conditions of Satisfaction.
  • Michael Wood explains why program management is more than just managing a portfolio of related projects.
  • Glen Alleman gives us a quick recap of how our techniques for decision making in the presence of uncertainty have evolved, and how estimating is key to modern processes.
  • Johanna Rothman explains why the “indispensable employee” is a problem for the team, for management, and for the indispensable employee.
  • Lynda Bourne gives us a quick overview of the relationship between ethics, culture, rules, and governance.
  • Steve Jones explores a hypothetical: a person in a trusted role, who has started doing things differently (but not out of role), being detected by security analytics.
  • Terry Czigan reviews Margaret Lee’s new book, “Leading Virtual Project Teams.”
  • Susanne Madsen applies the metaphor of Yin and Yang to leading projects.
  • Margaret Meloni shares a nice graphic that summarizes how much project managers earn around the world.
  • Elizabeth Harrin has identified ten high-value project management conferences for us to consider attending in 2015.

Agile Methods

  • Derek Huether found a new product that lets you implement a green technique: reusable story cards!
  • Kelsey van Haaster gives us a primer on technical debt.
  • John Goodpasture explains why round negotiating tables are Agile.
  • Fang Wan consider the tenuous relationship between work and hours in estimates.
  • Bart Gerardi explains why velocity is not a figure of merit for the team; it is a planning metric, not an efficiency metric.
  • Mike Cohn even uses Scrum concepts to organize his own work. Probably not a daily stand-up, but other concepts map nicely.

Looking Ahead

  • Deven Parekh projects five trends related to Big Data. “Personalized medicine?” The pharmacist as barista – wow …
  • Scott Berkun tries to measure a trend: just how popular is remote work?
  • Don Kim brings together various indicators that predict the growth of the independent project manager, as part of the new normal.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Cesar Abeid interviews Susanne Madsen, on the power of project leadership. Just 56 minutes, safe for work.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Brian Irwin on facilitating Agile transformations using the Socratic method. Just 17 minutes, safe for work.
  • Mark Phillipy interviews Joseph Flahiff on his new book, “Being Agile in a Waterfall World.” Just 58 minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!