New PM Articles for the Week of May 22 – 28

New project management articles published on the web during the week of May 22 – 28. And this week’s video: The Allman Brothers Band, live at the Beacon Theatre in New York in 2003, performing “Ain’t Wastin’ Time No More.” Rest in peace, Gregg.

Must read!

  • Eric Garton makes the case for managing human capital as carefully and rigorously as we manage financial capital (which is cheaper and far more plentiful).
  • Robert Austin and Gary Pisano report on the growth of neurodiversity—actively recruiting candidates and accommodating employees with autism and similar conditions—in the corporate world.
  • Brandon Vigliarolo reports that stolen (and exploitable) data from every single Fortune 500 company has been found on the DarkNet.

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin summarizes the high-level changes coming in the Sixth Edition of the PMBOK. To be released in 3Q17, with exam changes in 1Q18.
  • Mike Donoghue identifies the characteristics that make a project complex, from technical to financial to … well, lots of stuff.
  • Lynda Bourne reviews the various biases and political influences that may apply when using reference classes to calculate management reserves.
  • Mike Clayton explains how the linear responsibility chart connects work breakdown structure to resources. Just six minutes, safe for work.
  • Leigh Espy defines, compares, and contrasts Waterfall and Agile.
  • The Clever PM makes the case for managing to data, as opposed to going with your gut or best guess.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from resilient teams to Agile at scale, to Reddit for product managers, to revisiting Deming’s 14 points.
  • Johanna Rothman starts a series of articles to define “Scaling Agile,” so we all have a common vocabulary to argue with.
  • Scott Sehlhorst gives his thoughts on achieving Agile at Scale, focusing on product management.
  • Rex Lester lists what he believes to the three most important Agile practices. Actually, these are applicable to just about everything from retail to medical care.
  • John Yorke notes the difference between a deliberate culture and a reflective culture. You can’t change the behavior (and culture) of the group simply by changing processes.
  • Bob Tarne reflects on the nature of estimates, as he waits for the airline to resolve an unspecified technical issue.

Applied Leadership

  • Harry Hall shares some techniques for improving your presentations.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Dr. Ginger Levin on embracing and exploiting change. Just 28 minutes, safe for work.
  • John Goodpasture notes that those driving change won’t get much support from the people who will benefit from the change because they have experienced it yet.
  • Seth Godin shares an insight: people resist change because they are rewarded for being competent, and change brings the risk of incompetence.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Brendan Toner reviews Hyper Plan, a two-dimensional task manager. Looks interesting, but no mobile option.
  • Lee Munroe gets us started on user testing as a component of UX research.
  • David Schlesinger gives us the high points on implementing encryption for network assets, including an allowable exception for executives and their admins.

Working and the Workplace

  • Maddy Osman shares her collected practices for maintaining productivity when working from home.
  • Lisette Sutherland talks with Ralph van Roosmalen about a way for remote teams to make decisions on the fly, using a shared document. Just 12 minutes, safe for work.
  • Art Petty suggests we think of career planning as an adventure into parts unknown.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of May 15 – 21

New project management articles published on the web during the week of May 15 – 21. And this week’s video: a short clip from “Mr. Blandings Build His Dream House,” where Cary Grant learns what happens when you make a decision when you don’t understand the alternatives and don’t bother to ask for clarification. Just a minute, safe for work, as long as you aren’t standing under the lintels.

Must read!

  • Bertrand Duperrin casts a critical eye on ROI, business cases, and lying with numbers.
  • Martin Seligman and John Tierney report on recent research that indicates the human mind is built to spend a lot of time considering the future—planning if you will.
  • Ian Whittington explores the history of managing complexity in projects from the Iron Bridge constructed in the 18th century to today’s software systems with emergent behaviors.

Established Methods

  • Glen Alleman explains measures of effectiveness and measures of performance as different points of view when examining a proposed product capability.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy digs into the details to tutor us on managing stakeholder engagement, in a strategic way.
  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews Kate Morris—convener of the PMI Australia Conference 2017 and practicing project manager—on managing a project manager’s conference.
  • Michel Dion outlines the project closure report.
  • Mike Clayton explains the Project Goal, a simple concept with profound implications. Just over two minutes, safe for work.
  • Harry Hall suggests some effective ways to improve our communication skills.
  • Elise Stevens shares lessons learned from alienating a key stakeholder in their first meeting.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his list of Agile content with a focus this week on team building, plus observations on the relationship between product discovery and product delivery.
  • Mike Cohn describe four possible career paths for the accomplished Scrum master.
  • Eli Woolery recaps five key insights gained from the inaugural Design Leadership Camp.
  • The Clever PM conducts one of his “ten questions” interviews with Paul Jackson—product manager, user-centered design practitioner, and newsletter publisher.
  • Renee Troughton describes the three patterns she has seen used for Agile delivery pipeline management at scale.

Applied Leadership

  • Jeff Collins lists a half-dozen qualities of strong project leaders.
  • Pat Weaver describes practical wisdom, “working out the right way to do the right thing in a particular circumstance.”
  • Krister Ungerboeck reflects on the toxic legacy of Steve Jobs and his “wretched asshole” leadership style.
  • Alex Puscasu describes Connie Gersick’s punctuated equilibrium model of group development. There’s more than just forming-storming-norming-performing-adjourning.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • John Goodpasture points out the complexity that is inevitably required to enable simplicity.
  • James Sanders shares the smart person’s guide to ransomware.
  • Paramita Ghosh lays out the currently expected use cases for artificial intelligence.

Working and the Workplace

  • Art Petty critiques IBM recent announcement that it is ending remote working arrangements.
  • Grace Windsor reminds us that until recently, leisure time was a marker of success. Then we decided that constant busyness indicated professionalism.
  • Tom McFarlin reflects on managing the tension between work and vacation. As my Dad used to say, “You don’t own the business; the business owns you.”

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of April 24 – 30

New project management articles published on the web during the week of April 24 – 30. And this week’s video: Cassini phoned home to mission control at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California after successfully making the first of 22 orbits in the narrow gap between Saturn and its innermost rings. Not bad for a craft launched in October 1997!

Must read!

  • Mike Griffiths shares ideas on how to get PDU’s in the “Strategic and Business Management” area of the talent triangle. You need at least 8 to recertify as a PMP.
  • Ben Evans projects electric and autonomous vehicles, virtual reality, and machine learning out about five to ten years, in terms of consumer behavior change.
  • Ahmed Alkhateeb claims that Big Data and robotics are advanced enough to automate scientific research using Sir Francis Bacon’s model of discovery. Ahmed is a molecular cancer biologist at Harvard Medical School, so this is serious.

Established Methods

  • Mike Clayton tutors us on project governance, from its origin with the ancient Greeks to direction-setting, decision-making, and oversight.
  • Harry Hall catalogs the most common reasons and most beneficial ways to resolve project conflicts.
  • Glenn Alleman explains how to talk about estimates and their attributes of uncertainty: precision, accuracy, and bias.
  • Alex Pucasu identifies the common environmental elements that you should account for when making estimates.
  • Andy Jordan gets us up to speed on the portfolio-level view of projects with common goals.
  • John Goodpasture expounds on technical debt as an enabler, rather than an evil to be avoided.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from the futility of scaling Agile to why Agile doesn’t work in Asia, to morality, metrics, and more.
  • Mike Cohn addresses the question: does the Scrum Master role ever go away?
  • The Clever PM recommends you begin your Agile transformation with a healthy dose of practice, and forget about all that theory.
  • Ryan Ripley and Amatai Schleier interview Jessie Shternshus on how improv skills can help make your Agile team awesome. Just 43 minutes, safe for work.
  • Craig Smith interviews Paul Rayner on domain driven design, working with legacy code, and user story mapping. Just 49 minutes, safe for work.
  • Humberto Cordioli identifies the tradeoffs when determining whether to adopt a business or architectural orientation.
  • Saravana Bharathi explains how continuous integration and continuous delivery differ, but fit together.

Applied Leadership

  • Gina Abudi tells of a client who collaborated with her remote team to develop ground rules for how they would interact.
  • Esther Derby explains the three kinds of empathy, and how they improve our ability to adapt our “change” messaging.
  • Luis Seabra Coelho explains the Start-Stop-Continue feedback model, which seems to work well across most cultures.

The Power of YOU

  • Jesse Lyn Stoner encapsulates the barriers to successfully managing our time, how to overcome them, and how to stop procrastinating.
  • Brendan Toner reviews “The Power of Full Engagement,” by Jim Loehr and Tony Schwartz. They maintain that energy, not time, is our most precious resource.
  • Coert Visser examines the exercise choice: walking or running. Note that if your nose runs and your feet smell, you may be built upside down.

Project Management as a Career

  • Jon Vordermark takes a critical look at the career path for the typical corporate project manager and finds it lacking.
  • Leigh Espy suggests that the way to get into project management is from your current job.
  • Barry Hodge decided to create a more interesting intro to the basics of project management, for those who are thinking of getting into it.

Enjoy!