New PM Articles for the Week of July 24 – 30

New project management articles published on the web during the week of July 24 – 30. And this week’s video: Paul Brown provides a brief introduction to organizational change management. Just nine minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • NiMa Asghari lists some of the very real problems that drone delivery is going to solve. 4 minutes to read.
  • Connor Forrest summarizes a report from Accenture naming the top five cyber security threats seen this year and recommended countermeasures. 2 minutes to read.
  • Sean Gwaltney describes an interesting tool: the Purpose Breakdown Structure, which links strategic objectives, success criteria, and work packages. 6 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • Brendan Toner begins a three-part series on using the Critical Path method to deliver a project on time. 10 minutes to read.
  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews Colin D. Ellis author of The Project Rots from the Head. Video with transcript, 4 minutes, safe for work.
  • Barry Hodge takes the traditional 2 by 2 power and interest stakeholder matrix and maps each quadrant to an anthropomorphic animal. Embrace the metaphor! 6 minutes to read.
  • Kerry Wills shares a model for how the share of a project manager’s four primary activities evolves over the life cycle of a project. 2 minutes to read.
  • Vivien Goldstrong points out a few examples where cognitive computing might be useful in project management. 4 minutes to read.
  • Craig Brown outlines twelve steps to project success. A minute or so to read.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from why Spotify’s agile patterns work and why you shouldn’t copy them, to negotiation skills for product managers. 10 outbound links, 3 minutes to read.
  • John Goodpasture describes Agile methods as a series of nested planning cycles, each with a different horizon.
  • Leigh Espey explains the difference between a project manager role and a Scrum Master role. 5 minutes to read.
  • Regis Armel Asseman has compiled a few “diet tips” for a healthy software product. Yeah, it’s a gimmick, but a well-written gimmick. 6 minutes to read.
  • Ron Jeffries realizes that he wrote legacy code yesterday. And he probably will again, tomorrow. 2 minutes to read.
  • Valerie Senyk unpacks the implications of the Agile Manifesto’s fifth principle. 4 minutes to read.
  • Elyse Stevens interviews Jase Clamp on how a product manager handles stakeholder engagement. Audio only, 17 minutes, safe for work.

Applied Leadership

  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy explains Herzberg’s Two-Factor theory of motivation. 3 minutes to read. Includes a video—4 minutes, safe for work.
  • Lex Laufer and Jeff Russell make the case for managing by moving about: getting out and talking to the people, looking at the results. 2 minutes to read.
  • Lew Sauder describes the characteristics of the leadership personality. 3 minutes to read.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Glen Alleman explains why merely having a data set is insufficient to support a position—you also need a model that explains why you should be seeing that data. 3 minutes to read.
  • Shuba Kathikeyan gives us a thumbnail of eleven programming languages suitable for DevOps. 4 minutes to read.
  • Stefan Groschupf ruminates on what comes after Hadoop. Video, just over one minutes, safe for work.

Working and the Workplace

  • Harry Hall lays out the critical steps to develop a successful buy – seller relationship. 3 minutes to read.
  • Suzanne Lucas reports that the Japanese government is promoting telecommuting for several good reasons, including the 202 Olympics. Note: it’s not an event. 3 minutes to read.
  • Jenny Blake provides guidelines on what tasks to delegate, illustrated with Cheap Trick’s Rick Nielson playing three guitars. 5 minutes to read.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of July 10 – 16

New project management articles published on the web during the week of July 10 – 16. Note that this week marks an anniversary—I start curating this list seven years ago. And this week’s video: Brandon Rodriguez shares an interesting animation explaining the power of constraints on creativity and innovation. It turns out that we need at least a minimal box, after all. Just 5 minutes, safe for work.

Must read (or Hear)!

  • Glen Alleman contrasts scheduling software release based on the cadence of the development team with scheduling based on needed product capabilities. 2 minutes to read.
  • John Goodpasture explains the Hybrid (mixing Agile and established methods) Operating Principle: Agile projects are simultaneously strategically stationary and tactically iterative and emergent. 2 minutes to read.
  • Umberto D’Alessandro shares a case study of a project that failed because they were not solving the actual problem. An excellent lesson in data collection and analysis. 8 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews Pam Shergill on how she made the transition to project management by making herself redundant and now works as an independent project management consultant. 5 minutes to read.
  • Elise Stevens interview Ashleigh Waters on really knowing your stakeholders. Podcast, 19 minutes, safe for work.
  • Harry Hall tutors us on procurement management and how to improve our processes. 3 minutes to read.
  • Pat Weaver reviews differences in the upcoming PMBOK Guide 6th Edition and how it will impact PMI’s professional credential exams. 5 minutes to read.
  • Deb Schaffer gives us the basics on writing a problem statement. 5 minutes to read.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his list of Agile content, from product discovery and product-market fit to a hypothesis backlog, to a Manifesto for Change Management. 4 minutes to read, 11 links.
  • Leigh Espy provides a detailed overview of the Scrum Master’s responsibilities. 6 minutes to read.
  • Scott Selhorst starts with a sight gag and expands into a discussion of selected human behavior principles, as they apply to product design. 5 minutes to read.
  • The Clever PM interviews Suzanne Abate on her latest project: collecting the stories, advice, and experience of 100 product managers. 6 minutes to read.
  • Johanna Rothman explains how to create delivery milestones when using iteration-based methods. 4 minutes to read.
  • Hemant Kothiyal tutors us on story points and how to use them. 4 minutes to read.
  • John Yorke quotes ancient Roman Publilius Syrus to demonstrate that Agile thinking has a deeper history than you might imagine. 1 minute to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Nancy Settle-Murphy extracts several essential questions from James Ryan’s book, “Wait, What, and Life’s Other Essential Questions.” 5 minutes to read.
  • Gina Abudi recommends that you regularly ask your team for feedback: How well am I doing as a team leader? 2 minutes to read.
  • Mike Clayton explains transformational leadership, as opposed to transactional leadership. Video, 5 minutes, safe for work.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • RTS Labs explains what Net Neutrality is and why it should matter to those of us who make our living with technology. 5 minutes to read.
  • Prateek Singh explores Conway’s Law (“How do committees invent?”) and Little’s Law of queuing to chart a path to flat, customer-centered organizations. 11 minutes to read.
  • Ryan Ogilvie notes the three special challenges that IT service managers face in communicating with their customers. 3 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Katie Perry collates a few action items for cubicle dwellers making the transition to digital nomads. 7 minutes to read.
  • Rebecca Greenfield reports on a growing trend: the end of telecommuting. 4 minutes to read.
  • Lisette Sutherland highlights five of her favorite segments from the last 50 Collaboration Superpower interviews. Podcast, 19 minutes, safe for work.
  • Marcio Santos shared an infographic on common productivity killers and ways we can avoid them. 3 minutes to read.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of April 17 – 23

New project management articles published on the web during the week of April 17 – 23. And this week’s video: Carl T. Bergstrom and Jevin West introduce their new 1 credit hour course at the University of Washington on Calling Bullshit. Eight minutes, and I could say it was safe for work, but I’d be full of shit.

Must read!

  • Joseph Kelly makes the case that the role of the Entrepreneur is to create new Truths. And along the way, some of these Truths may not be absolute. It’s about creation, not morality. Read this with an open mind and be prepared to come back to it later.
  • Will Knight points out a problem with Deep Learning artificial intelligence applications: since they learned by observing human behavior, we can’t explain how they make decisions.
  • Michael O’Brochta explains how sunk costs, groupthink, escalation of commitment, and conflicts of interest make failing projects so hard to kill.

Established Methods

  • Robert Wysocki elaborates on the co-manager model for complex projects, where a product manager and a process manager collaborate to lead a combined team.
  • Harry Hall catalogs some actions we can take to recognize and reward our project teams.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Hans Arnbjerg on how the PMO can help project managers engage with their stakeholders.
  • Mike Clayton a list of 22 excellent project management podcasts—“[some] extinct, some dormant, and some highly active.”
  • Alex Puscasu looks at the potential upside of integrating Scrum into Prince2.
  • Lew Sauder uses the Fitbit as an introduction to measures of project health: one metric does not tell a meaningful story.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly round-up of Agile content, from the C-suite’s fondness for Big Bangs to what we can learn from the customer service debacle at United Airlines, to the Museum of Failure.
  • Jordan Koschel explains how to deal with design debt. Like technical debt, only more visible to your user community.
  • Anurag Prakash takes a critical look at the way burn-downs are used in practice. Let project structure drive your choice of metrics.
  • The Clever PM interviews one of his mentors, Rich Mironov. Based on this interview, I’m now following Rich’s blog.
  • Jesse Fewell addresses the question: where is the project manager role in Agile methods? Just 7 minutes, safe for work.
  • Ryan Ripley interviews Lisa Crispin and Amitai Schleier on the fine art of co-presenting at conferences, co-writing books, and Agile testing. Just 44 minutes, safe for work.

Applied Leadership

  • Glen Alleman identifies seven key behaviors that can be found in a weak leader.
  • Coert Visser examines the difference between (benign) admiration and (malicious) envy and how each motivates us.
  • Jayath Jayarathna guides us through managing subject matter experts.
  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews Karen Chovan, project manager and advocate for clean, lean, and green solutions.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Naomi Caietti explains the six emotional intelligence behaviors and skill sets necessary for project and program managers.
  • John Goodpasture shares his FAQ on systems engineering.
  • Brendan Toner lists his ten most useful iPad apps. I have five of them on my iPad and similar apps for four of the others. And we both drink Bushmills, so there’s that.

Working and the Workplace

  • Ron Rosenhead notes a survey of workers in various professions that found only the legal profession is more boring that project management. Statisticians and journalists didn’t make the list, which makes it somewhat suspect …
  • Andy Kaufman interviews author Amy Blankson on the strategies we can use to stay productive and happy when surrounded by interactive tech. Just 49 minutes, safe for work.
  • Lisette Sutherland interviews Jerry Koch-Gonzales on the practice of Sociocracy in group meetings. Just 38 minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!