New PM Articles for the Week of February 1 – 7

New project management articles published on the web during the week of February 1 – 7. And this week’s video is Survivorman Les Stroud and his buddy Bob with a deep woods harmonica duet.

Must read!

  • Suzanne Lucas summarizes recent research into what make us appear to be stupid. Three behaviors dominated – and you can change your behavior!
  • John Goodpasture gets us back to the numerical basics of counting, measuring, and positioning. Elegant + simple = profound.
  • Michael Wood provides a comprehensive introduction to ethics, as it applies to project management. With lots of links to excellent topical content!

Established Methods

  • Mark Langley, CEO of the Project Management Institute, advises CFO’s on how to optimize project portfolio management in their organization.
  • Glen Alleman notes that the first step in estimating work to be done is simple research: has this been done before?
  • Harry Hall describes the Nominal Group Technique for risk identification.
  • Steven Levy reminds us that optimizing our designs for use is more important than optimizing them to prevent abuse.
  • Bob Tarne presents another idea from Change by Design: experimenting.
  • Nick Pisoni attacks some lingering false assumptions related to use of hard data to assess project performance.

Agile Methods

  • Johanna Rothman contrasts the Burndown and Burnup charts, to make the point that what matter is what action the data drives you to take.
  • Richard DeFrancesco adds flow and Cycle Time charts from Lean to Burn Up charts, to help his team better visualize work completed and in progress.
  • Bernd Schiffer wants us to view retrospectives as an investment, that pays off over time.
  • Derek Huether promotes his three favorite Agile apps for the iPhone.
  • Nilesh Shah enumerates the Seven Sins of Scrum.

Applied Leadership

  • Cameron Conaway notes that silos have a function; eliminating them altogether might be counter-productive.
  • Susanne Madsen shares some advice for forming and managing geographically distributed teams.
  • Liane Davey offers some ideas for moving from argument and confrontation to collaboration.
  • Art Petty recommends we widen our field of view, especially when developing strategy.
  • The Clever PM opines that the true test of our values comes when face adversity.
  • Deb Schaffer recaps the steps to putting together a project team.

Pot Pouri

  • Danielle Kohler begins an interview series with IT recruiter extraordinaire, Gail Rolls on how to success in a job interview.
  • Elizabeth Harrin advises new folks – especially young women – what behaviors will help them be taken seriously at work.
  • Shikha Menwal observes the inverse relationship between “busy” and “productive.”
  • Mathieu Noiville points us toward five excellent project management blogs.
  • Bruce Harpham recommends 16(!) podcasts for career development, project management, and more.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of January 18 – 24

New project management articles published on the web during the week of January 18 – 24, and we’re just sittin’ on top of the world. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Aaron Smith identifies ten strategy execution trends that will impact the way we manage projects in 2016.
  • Bruce Harpham retrieves six principles for success from Ashlee Vance’s biography of Elon Musk. If you’re going to admire a billionaire, this might be the guy.
  • John Goodpasture analyzes the idea that we should make mistakes early and often. Not all mistakes are created equal!

Established Methods

  • Aaron Smith summarizes three critical questions posed by Patrick Stroh, author of “Advancing Innovation,” to assess which ideas are worth pursuing.
  • Henny Portman reviews “Executive Sponsor Research Report,” from The Standish Group.
  • Glen Alleman describes capabilities-based planning, for software-intensive systems to be built for government customers, using Agile methods.
  • Gene Gendel points out the limitations of Red-Amber-Green status reporting.
  • Harry Hall details the operational risk management plan and the various sources of operational risk.
  • Ryan Ogilvie examines the part of IT that faces the customer, the service request system, from both the customer perspective and the IT perspective.
  • Women Testers Magazine for January 2016 is available for download. Not just for women and not just for testers – highly recommended.

Agile Methods

  • Renee Troughton considers a critical question for hiring a Scrum Master: what is the minimum viable Agilist?
  • Mike Cohn addresses the rationale behind the frequent question, “Does a Scrum team need a retrospective every sprint?”
  • Vikram Singh describes the most common methods used to gauge the level of effort required for each story in sprint planning.
  • Bart Gerardi describes the role of the Agile executive in changing the organization’s culture.
  • Kaushik Saha analyzes Kanban as a queue, using Little’s Law.

Applied Leadership

  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews Sarah Coleman, co-author of “Project Leadership.”
  • Cesar Abeid interviews Don Smith, “The Speech Wiz,” on the life and career value of developing your public speaking and communication skills. Just over an hour, safe for work.
  • Liane Davey explains how to create a sense of accountability in the people who report to you.
  • Kailash Awati shares his presentation on improving decision-making in situations with high ambiguity, using IBIS notation for issue mapping. About 48 minutes, safe for work.
  • Art Petty notes that leading drains the spirit, and offers some ideas on how to refuel.
  • Gina Abudi proposes creation of a team charter, articulating the purpose, mission, and goals of the team.

Other

  • Jamie Condliffe lists the 25 most popular passwords, gleaned from over two million stolen and leaked on the internet.
  • Thor Olavsrud reports on efforts to apply artificial intelligence to problems where not all of the information is visible. For example: Heads-up No-limit Texas Hold ’em poker.
  • Brad Rach extols the virtues of a paper notebook. His choice: Moleskine.
  • Johanna Rothman shares a few tips on the process of writing.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of January 11 – 17

New project management articles published on the web during the week of January 11 – 17. This week’s favorite video: what happens when you reply to Spam – thanks, Garry, for the link! Recommended:

Must read!

  • Jeff Hawkins and Donna Lubinsky (remember the Palm Pilot and Treo?) explain the nuances of different approaches to machine intelligence and learning.
  • Bernard Marr introduces us to the future of short-range, wireless networking technology. Called LiFi, it’s essentially an LED that can transmit 224 GB per second. The mind boggles …
  • Coert Visser summarizes three phenomena which have ramifications for self-assessment: the Dunning-Kruger effect, the curse of knowledge, and the raised bar.

Established Methods

  • Brad Rach explains the bus rule: “Being a good project manager means I could get hit by a bus tomorrow and no one would notice.”
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Risk Doctor David Hillson on his presentation, “Weight Loss for Risky Projects.” Just 17 minutes, safe for work.
  • Harry Hall lists the topics to include in a risk management plan.
  • Emily Sue Tomac shows us two lists: then ten most frequently researched project management tools on TrustRadius, and the ten top rated. Note the lack of correlation.
  • John Goodpasture draws our attention to John Higbee’s “Program Success Probability Summary,” a colorful dashboard with trend indicators. Mental wheels are turning …
  • Elizabeth Harrin starts her new series, Inspiring Women in Project Management, by interviewing Caroline Crewe-Read. Stonehenge – seriously?!?
  • Cesar Abeid interviews Adam Nesrallah, a former spy, on applying intelligence gathering skills to communication. Just 39 minutes, safe for work.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Andrew Pearce on establishing and maintaining engagement with your stakeholders. Just 21 minutes, safe for work.
  • Nick Pisano continues his ruminations on materiality and prescriptiveness, as they apply to contractual relationships.

Agile Methods

  • Bob Tarne summarizes the concepts of divergence and convergence (as they apply to generating and selecting ideas) from Tim Brown’s “Change by Design.”
  • Neil Killick explains why MYOB plans to hire full-time Agile coaches in Melbourne, Sydney, and Auckland, and how they plan to leverage them.
  • Henny Portman shares his Prince2 Agilometer, an interesting tool for assessing the balance between structure and agility.
  • Craig Smith interviews Tom and Mary Poppendieck on Agile, Lean, rapid feedback, culture, and leadership. Just 43 minutes, safe for work.
  • The Clever PM tells how to get organizational alignment with the product road map.

Applied Leadership

  • Art Petty has begun a new series, called the manager’s guide to understanding strategy. This looks very good, even by Art’s standards.
  • Johanna Rothman concludes her series on how to leverage certifications in the hiring process without drowning out the more important stuff.
  • Suzanne Lucas gets us up to speed on a new trend in recruiting: No Resumes. Candidates are assessed on the quality of what they produce when given an assignment.
  • Colin Ellis explores the balancing act between leadership, organizational cultural, and project management methods.
  • James Clear explains how to cure Akrasia (what the ancient Greeks called procrastination).

Enjoy!