New PM Articles for the Week of September 11 – 17

New project management articles published on the web during the week of September 11 – 17. And this week’s video: the folks at MePIN provide a little background on the GDPR, if it’s not already on your radar. Just 2 minutes, safe for work.

Must read (or Listen)!

  • Lily Hay Newman gives us some background on the Social Security number—why we still use it for so many things and what the Equifax breach might mean for our American identity crisis. 5 minutes to read.
  • Russell Brandom diagnoses the larger problem: our entire credit bureau system, which relies on data that is no longer private, is irretrievably broken. 4 minutes to read.
  • Bertrand Duperrin notes measures of a lack of business maturity in data privacy and security practices, even with the General Data Protection Regulation becoming effective in May 2018. 3 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • Harry Hall explains why those who already have their PMP should read the PMBOK 6th edition. 2 minutes to read, and I second the motion.
  • Elizabeth Harrin reviews The Project Manager’s Little Book of Cheats, by Beth Spriggs. “I’ve covered it in sticky notes.” 2 minutes to read.
  • Johnny Beirne interviews Mike Clayton on the importance of project definition. Podcast, 28 minutes.
  • Ron Rosenhead notes the potential value in a selection process for project sponsors. 2 minutes to read.
  • Cheryl Texeira walks us through planning a project with an unrealistic deadline. 3 minutes to read.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list, from Agile metrics to scaling Agile, to the existential question: Is Agile Doomed? 11 outbound links, 3 minutes to scan.
  • Mike Cohn maps out the most productive way for programmers and testers to collaborate. 7 minutes to read.
  • Johanna Rothman continues her series on alternatives for Agile and Lean road mapping, describing the Product Value Team. 3 minutes to read.
  • Mishkin Berteig lists three alternatives to Scrum and identifies how well each fits IT project work. 8 minutes to read.
  • Bart Gerardi describes the benefits of an Agile Center of Excellence as opposed to a more common Project Management Office. 7 minutes to read.
  • Scott Sehlhorst describes an approach for progressively elaborating the team’s understanding and behavior model of the users. 6 minutes to read.
  • Jason Moccia tutors us on design sprints, which use Scrum to refine the requirements and design before beginning development. WaterScrum? Uh, no. 7 minutes to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Uri Galimidi tells an anecdote about a manager who failed to hear what he was being told and offers some thoughts on developing your listening ability. 4 minutes to read.
  • Art Petty describes the corporate Zombie Apocalypse and offers some head-shots to deal with the causes. 3 minutes to read.
  • Ted Bauer eviscerates the “high achiever” myth, with acerbic wit, foul language, and several anecdotes. 6 minutes to read.
  • Suzanne Lucas gives us the executive micro-summary of a study conducted by an all-women team at BCG on what is helping women succeed and what is not. 3 minutes to read.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Ryan Ogilvie shows how to sell service improvement to decision makers as a value-add. 3 minutes to read.
  • Steven Levy profiles the team at CTRL-Labs and the work they’re doing on a brain-machine interface that might soon be implemented as a watchband. 15 minutes to read, but absolutely worth it.
  • John Goodpasture links Oren Etzioni’s rules for AI systems with Isaac Asimov’s laws of robotics for an interesting baseline of constraints. 2 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Mike Griffiths expands on Dianna Larson’s recent keynote speech, “Knowledge work is learning work.” 4 minutes to read.
  • Adam Schwartz, founder and CEO of Articulate, tells us why (and how) remote work scales. 5 minutes to read.
  • Conner Forrest reports on a recent survey by Softchoice: 74% of office workers would change jobs to firms that supported working from home. 2 minutes to read.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of July 24 – 30

New project management articles published on the web during the week of July 24 – 30. And this week’s video: Paul Brown provides a brief introduction to organizational change management. Just nine minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • NiMa Asghari lists some of the very real problems that drone delivery is going to solve. 4 minutes to read.
  • Connor Forrest summarizes a report from Accenture naming the top five cyber security threats seen this year and recommended countermeasures. 2 minutes to read.
  • Sean Gwaltney describes an interesting tool: the Purpose Breakdown Structure, which links strategic objectives, success criteria, and work packages. 6 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • Brendan Toner begins a three-part series on using the Critical Path method to deliver a project on time. 10 minutes to read.
  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews Colin D. Ellis author of The Project Rots from the Head. Video with transcript, 4 minutes, safe for work.
  • Barry Hodge takes the traditional 2 by 2 power and interest stakeholder matrix and maps each quadrant to an anthropomorphic animal. Embrace the metaphor! 6 minutes to read.
  • Kerry Wills shares a model for how the share of a project manager’s four primary activities evolves over the life cycle of a project. 2 minutes to read.
  • Vivien Goldstrong points out a few examples where cognitive computing might be useful in project management. 4 minutes to read.
  • Craig Brown outlines twelve steps to project success. A minute or so to read.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from why Spotify’s agile patterns work and why you shouldn’t copy them, to negotiation skills for product managers. 10 outbound links, 3 minutes to read.
  • John Goodpasture describes Agile methods as a series of nested planning cycles, each with a different horizon.
  • Leigh Espey explains the difference between a project manager role and a Scrum Master role. 5 minutes to read.
  • Regis Armel Asseman has compiled a few “diet tips” for a healthy software product. Yeah, it’s a gimmick, but a well-written gimmick. 6 minutes to read.
  • Ron Jeffries realizes that he wrote legacy code yesterday. And he probably will again, tomorrow. 2 minutes to read.
  • Valerie Senyk unpacks the implications of the Agile Manifesto’s fifth principle. 4 minutes to read.
  • Elyse Stevens interviews Jase Clamp on how a product manager handles stakeholder engagement. Audio only, 17 minutes, safe for work.

Applied Leadership

  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy explains Herzberg’s Two-Factor theory of motivation. 3 minutes to read. Includes a video—4 minutes, safe for work.
  • Lex Laufer and Jeff Russell make the case for managing by moving about: getting out and talking to the people, looking at the results. 2 minutes to read.
  • Lew Sauder describes the characteristics of the leadership personality. 3 minutes to read.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Glen Alleman explains why merely having a data set is insufficient to support a position—you also need a model that explains why you should be seeing that data. 3 minutes to read.
  • Shuba Kathikeyan gives us a thumbnail of eleven programming languages suitable for DevOps. 4 minutes to read.
  • Stefan Groschupf ruminates on what comes after Hadoop. Video, just over one minutes, safe for work.

Working and the Workplace

  • Harry Hall lays out the critical steps to develop a successful buy – seller relationship. 3 minutes to read.
  • Suzanne Lucas reports that the Japanese government is promoting telecommuting for several good reasons, including the 202 Olympics. Note: it’s not an event. 3 minutes to read.
  • Jenny Blake provides guidelines on what tasks to delegate, illustrated with Cheap Trick’s Rick Nielson playing three guitars. 5 minutes to read.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of July 10 – 16

New project management articles published on the web during the week of July 10 – 16. Note that this week marks an anniversary—I start curating this list seven years ago. And this week’s video: Brandon Rodriguez shares an interesting animation explaining the power of constraints on creativity and innovation. It turns out that we need at least a minimal box, after all. Just 5 minutes, safe for work.

Must read (or Hear)!

  • Glen Alleman contrasts scheduling software release based on the cadence of the development team with scheduling based on needed product capabilities. 2 minutes to read.
  • John Goodpasture explains the Hybrid (mixing Agile and established methods) Operating Principle: Agile projects are simultaneously strategically stationary and tactically iterative and emergent. 2 minutes to read.
  • Umberto D’Alessandro shares a case study of a project that failed because they were not solving the actual problem. An excellent lesson in data collection and analysis. 8 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews Pam Shergill on how she made the transition to project management by making herself redundant and now works as an independent project management consultant. 5 minutes to read.
  • Elise Stevens interview Ashleigh Waters on really knowing your stakeholders. Podcast, 19 minutes, safe for work.
  • Harry Hall tutors us on procurement management and how to improve our processes. 3 minutes to read.
  • Pat Weaver reviews differences in the upcoming PMBOK Guide 6th Edition and how it will impact PMI’s professional credential exams. 5 minutes to read.
  • Deb Schaffer gives us the basics on writing a problem statement. 5 minutes to read.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his list of Agile content, from product discovery and product-market fit to a hypothesis backlog, to a Manifesto for Change Management. 4 minutes to read, 11 links.
  • Leigh Espy provides a detailed overview of the Scrum Master’s responsibilities. 6 minutes to read.
  • Scott Selhorst starts with a sight gag and expands into a discussion of selected human behavior principles, as they apply to product design. 5 minutes to read.
  • The Clever PM interviews Suzanne Abate on her latest project: collecting the stories, advice, and experience of 100 product managers. 6 minutes to read.
  • Johanna Rothman explains how to create delivery milestones when using iteration-based methods. 4 minutes to read.
  • Hemant Kothiyal tutors us on story points and how to use them. 4 minutes to read.
  • John Yorke quotes ancient Roman Publilius Syrus to demonstrate that Agile thinking has a deeper history than you might imagine. 1 minute to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Nancy Settle-Murphy extracts several essential questions from James Ryan’s book, “Wait, What, and Life’s Other Essential Questions.” 5 minutes to read.
  • Gina Abudi recommends that you regularly ask your team for feedback: How well am I doing as a team leader? 2 minutes to read.
  • Mike Clayton explains transformational leadership, as opposed to transactional leadership. Video, 5 minutes, safe for work.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • RTS Labs explains what Net Neutrality is and why it should matter to those of us who make our living with technology. 5 minutes to read.
  • Prateek Singh explores Conway’s Law (“How do committees invent?”) and Little’s Law of queuing to chart a path to flat, customer-centered organizations. 11 minutes to read.
  • Ryan Ogilvie notes the three special challenges that IT service managers face in communicating with their customers. 3 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Katie Perry collates a few action items for cubicle dwellers making the transition to digital nomads. 7 minutes to read.
  • Rebecca Greenfield reports on a growing trend: the end of telecommuting. 4 minutes to read.
  • Lisette Sutherland highlights five of her favorite segments from the last 50 Collaboration Superpower interviews. Podcast, 19 minutes, safe for work.
  • Marcio Santos shared an infographic on common productivity killers and ways we can avoid them. 3 minutes to read.

Enjoy!