New PM Articles for the Week of November 30 – December 6

Balloon SunriseNew project management articles published on the web during the week of November 30 – December 6. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Patti Gilchrist recommends reducing the cost of poor quality with a risk-based testing strategy. And like most good project strategies, it starts at the beginning.
  • Art Petty encourages us to become more discriminating consumers of leadership content – getting away from the “happy talk” and digging into the dirty details.
  • Susanne Madsen details an approach for “up-skilling” an organization’s project managers.

Established Methods

  • Jeff Collins lists his top ten project management thought leaders to follow in 2016.
  • Justin Stoltzfus identifies trends in business intelligence and data analysis for 2016.
  • Todd Williams builds on an earlier post, on avoiding litigation when managing a project on behalf of a customer.
  • Nick Pisano continues his series on a general theory of project management, based on research into complex adaptive systems.
  • Elizabeth Harrin details “most effective practices” in business requirements management.
  • Harry Hall checklists the questions new team members need to have answered.
  • Gina Abudi identifies three challenges uncovered in a survey of managers who lead virtual teams, and strategies to handle them.
  • Martin Coomber demonstrates a few Visio process modeling productivity hacks.

Agile Methods

  • Glen Alleman notes that Agile at scale, in software-intensive systems-of-systems, is a very different Agile from five to eight developers in a room together.
  • Madhavi Ledalla expounds on release planning and release management – two critical techniques for delivering working software in iterations.
  • Esther Derby suggests that the team needs to understand what the product does, from the user’s point of view.
  • Mike Cohn provides an example of how to use a zero-point estimate on a user story.
  • Johanna Rothman starts a series on applying Agile methods to hardware development projects.
  • Reuben Salisbury gives us five reasons why a physical Scrum board beats the one you can access from anywhere, on a variety of devices.

Applied Leadership

  • Eric Johnson provides an executive-level bit of advice: be quick to listen and slow to react.
  • Bruce Harpham summarizes key lessons from “The Truth About Employee Engagement,” by Patrick Lencioni.
  • Colin Ellis identifies five “types” of project managers, based on their observable behaviors.
  • Bertrand Duperrin says that humans must learn to work with robots – not because humans will be replaced, but because collaboration has more potential.
  • Seth Godin notes that it isn’t economically viable (or even possible) to please some percentage of your customers.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Richard Larson on his PMI Global Congress presentation, “Entrepreneurial Business Analysis Practitioner.” Just 17 minutes, safe for work.
  • Jesse Fewell shares a rant: why would you even want to go Agile? It shouldn’t just be “fear of missing out;” you should be seeking transformation. Just five minutes, safe for work.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Marie Longworth on managing remote vendors. Just 18 minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of November 23 – 29

Yellow BalloonNew project management articles published on the web during the week of November 23 – 29. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Tom McFarlin recalls Dwight D. Eisenhower’s clarification on the difference between important and urgent. Knowing the difference will help you prioritize your tasks.
  • Bertrand Duperrin points out an interesting development reflected in Jane McConnell’s annual study: your intranet and your organization are the two sides of a single reality.
  • Dick Weisinger reports on a Gartner Group estimate that 2018, half of all ethics violations will arise from improper use of Big Data.

Established Methods

  • Nick Pisano begins a series describing a general theory of projects as complex adaptive systems, based on systems theory.
  • Henny Portman reviews the second edition of “Project Sponsorship,” by Randall Englund and Alfonso Bucero, from PMI.
  • Mike Clayton explains how to lead your project sponsor. Yes, you have to lead up, or you’ll let them down.
  • Todd Williams provides a top-level look at organization change models, noting that they don’t all address the same things.
  • Thomas Carney describes the trade-offs of push processes versus pull process in issue management.
  • Harry Hall explains how to improve the quality of your risk statements.
  • Matthew Squair identifies a problem with the way that the Federal Aviation Administration defines risk severity classifications.
  • Sarah Hood tells how to include risk management into communications planning.
  • Kevin Coleman notes that everything from social media to business participation in development has raised the stakes for proper testing.
  • John Goodpasture points out an inescapable fact: most projects run on “little data,” which is mostly tracked in Excel.
  • Glen Alleman differentiates between a system and the products that comprise or deploy the system. Important distinctions for estimating cost and schedule!

Agile Methods

  • Mike Griffiths looks at managing program benefits from an Agile perspective.
  • Derek Huether uses the experience of renewing his driver’s license to illustrate two important Lean metrics: Lead Time and Cycle Time.
  • Dele Oluwole suggests pairings of Scrum, XP, DSDM, and Lean. Sort of an Agile sommelier…

Applied Leadership

  • Elizabeth Harrin expounds on that most practical skill: leadership.
  • Bruce Harpham reflects on his positive experience as an active member of Toastmasters.
  • Art Petty describes the behavior of a negative manager type he calls the “hyper-rooster.” And the cure involves more than just switching to decaf.
  • Liane Davey concludes her analysis of what’s missing from executive teams, and how to bridge the gap.
  • Ravindra Wankar offers some advice for Millenial project managers.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Frank Saladis on his 2015 PMI Global Congress presentation, ”The Indispensable Project Manager.” Just 21 minutes, safe for work.
  • Allen Ruddock illustrates how to analyze a business problem to ensure you are doing the right project. Just ten minutes, safe for work.
  • Margaret Meloni explains how to diffuse anger. Just two minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of October 26 – November 1

Blue BalloonNew project management articles published on the web during the week of October 26 – November 1. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. And don’t forget: Thursday, November 5, is International Project Management Day.

Must Read!

  • Elizabeth Harrin summarizes the changes to the PMP exam, coming in January 2016. The changes reflect the findings of the most recent role delineation survey.
  • Peter Landau summarizes current trends in the online project management community, from International Project Management Day (November 5) to project leadership.
  • The October 2015 edition of Women Testers is now available, with articles on everything from mind mapping to stress and work, to the conclusion in their series about testing in the cloud. If you haven’t discovered this great online magazine, it’s time to catch up!

Established Methods

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Simona Fallavolita, who manages the PMP certification program, on the changes coming in January. Just 18 minutes, safe for work.
  • Pat Weaver tutors us on the differences between Critical Path Method (CPM) and Program Evaluation Review Technique (PERT).
  • Yasser Mahmud describes a methodology for assessing the maturity level of your PMO, and determining where to make improvements.
  • Mario Trentim has compiled a different sort of FAQ: Frequently Avoided Questions about PMO’s.
  • Harry Hall shows us how to complete a stakeholder register. Just four minutes, safe for work.
  • Ryan Ogilvie tells how to collect feedback, from deciding what you’ll do with it to closing the loop with the people who participated.
  • Linky van der Merwe takes the pulse of the Accidental Project Manager. Yup, still living…
  • Kenneth Darter examines the transition to production, or as he puts it,” The art of letting go.”

Agile Methods

  • Pawel Brodzinski suggests a Kanban alternative to limiting work in progress: find the next task by working from right to left, backward from “done.”
  • Jared Smith shares a web site designer’s point of view on budgeting and estimating.
  • Mike Cohn on doing without a design phase: “Designers need to think holistically but work incrementally.”
  • Tom McFarlin contemplates the social nature of a software development team.
  • Thomas Carney shares a nice history of Scrum, plus links to other articles, resources and reference material. Highly recommended!

Applied Leadership

  • Liane Davey reflects on the delicate balance between “confident, capable, and solution-oriented” and being approachable.
  • Sarah Hood explains why saying “no” can be good for your career. And it’s not just about opportunity cost.
  • Art Petty continues his “Next Act” series for us older folks, with an interesting charge: focus on your superpower, meaning what you do best.
  • Melanie Pinola lists ten “soft skills” and provide links to resources that will help you develop them.
  • William Guinan tell us how to manage negative emotions.
  • Richard Lepsinger summarizes recent research into generational differences.
  • Coert Vissar: “Research suggests that performance goals in education are less effective than mastery goals.”

Enjoy!