New PM Articles for the Week of November 6 – 12

New project management articles published on the web during the week of November 6 – 12. And this week’s video: Ken Schwaber and Jeff Sutherland discuss the history of Scrum and the newest update to the Scrum Guide, just released this week. 55 minutes, safe for work.

Must read (or Listen)!

  • George Paliy provides an overview of the GDPR, including obligations of organizations that collect and control personally identifiable information and the rights of the people whose data has been collected. 8 minutes to read.
  • Kevin Coleman answers the rhetorical question: does IT strategy have a future? Isn’t technology now an integral component of business strategy? 4 minutes to read.
  • Mike Griffiths explains the impact that the recent release of the PMBOK Guide 6th Edition and the Agile Practice Guide will have on those studying for the PMP, PMI-ACP, and CAPM. 3 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • The BlacksmithGlen Alleman introduces Integrating Program management and System Engineering, edited by Eric Rebentisch. Sounds interesting, just a minute to scan.
  • Mike Agnello shares ten rueful project aphorisms. If they weren’t all true, I might have laughed at some of them. 5 minutes to read.
  • John Goodpasture quotes from Agile Testing by Lisa Crispin and Janey Gregory on the reasons to use an automated to track problem reports. 2 minutes to read.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy takes us on a deep dive into project integration management. 5 minutes to read.
  • Mike Clayton gives us the history and use of the PERT Chart and compares it to CPM. Video, 5 minutes, safe for work.
  • Harry Hall answers our questions about the PMI-RMP (risk management professional) credential. 2 minutes to read.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from an Agile periodic table (Mendeleev was Agile?) to the impact of GAAP on Agile adoption to an AMA with Steve Portigal. 2 minutes to scan, 7 outbound links.
  • Henny Portman points out what has been changed in the newest update to The Scrum Guide. 2 minutes to read.
  • John Yorke reflects on whether it is more effective to teach Agile methods or the Agile mindset? 4 minutes to read.
  • Dave Prior interviews Andrew Stellman and Jenny Green on their new book, Head First Agile: A brain-friendly guide to Agile and the PMI-ACP. Podcast, 29 minutes, safe for work.
  • Shreehari Narayana tells how his organization adopted Scrum, with bullet points organized under the Principles described in the Agile Manifesto. 7 minutes to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Cesar Abeid and Traci Duez starting a new interview series on how we can achieve insights into our own behavior. Podcast, 26 minutes, safe for work. Welcome back, Cesar—we’ve missed you!
  • Leigh Espy describes five styles of effective listening and when to apply them. 6 minutes to read, but take a few extra minutes to digest.
  • Judith Humphrey teaches a few straightforward, emotionally intelligent techniques to be a better listener and a more effective influencer. 5 minutes to read.
  • Derek Huether recommends that everyone in the company should understand what metrics drive the business and what behaviors they encourage. 3 minutes to read.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Adam Shostack reflects on the key takeaways from Collin Greene’s Fixing Security Bugs. 3 minutes to read.
  • Elizabeth Harrin explains why we need tags and a data taxonomy and how to use it to categorize the data you collect during a project. 5 minutes to read.
  • Roy Agababa reports on the ways that the insurance industry is (and soon will be) using data analytics to transform business and service offerings. 5 minutes to read.
  • Kong Yang tutors us on microservices—from the technology to the business decisions to be made. 5 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Kiron Bondale sees computer-assisted project management as not only a near-term development but another aspect of diversity in the workplace. 2 minutes to read.
  • Lisette Sutherland highlights a few “up and coming” tools for remote workers. Podcast, 8 minutes, safe for work.
  • Seth Godin points out that we talk differently when the speakerphone is on. Louder, for sure. Just a minute to read, but the self-consciousness will linger.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of April 11 – 17

New project management articles published on the web during the week of April 11 – 17. And this week’s video: Crazy Russian Hacker explains that we’ve been splitting firewood wrong all these years. “Safety is number one priority.” Spasibo, moy drug …

Must read!

  • Donald Charles Wynes suggests an interesting way to identify risks: pretend the project is over, and you’re trying to analyze why it failed.
  • Mike Clayton recommends eight techniques for identifying risks. I especially like Brainwriting and Pre-Mortem.
  • Andy Jordan points out another source of risk: a change in leadership.

Established Methods

  • Harry Hall shares a checklist that should help you understand your project, which is the first step in managing it.
  • Glen Alleman presents the Project Breathalyzer: should your project even be on the road?
  • Women Testers has released the April edition of their quarterly online magazine.
  • John Goodpasture contemplates managing schedule slack, based on a TED talk by Tim Urban on procrastination. Just 14 minutes, safe for work.
  • Elizabeth Harrin reviews Simon Moore’s book, “Strategic Portfolio Management.”
  • Elise Stevens interviews Emma Arnaz-Pemberton on how PMO’s can become trusted partners to the business. Just 16 minutes, safe for work.

Agile Methods

  • Alistair Cockburn gives an excellent talk, “The Heart of Agile.” Just 50 minutes, safe for work.
  • Joshua Taylor makes a good point: designers shouldn’t focus on code – they should focus on the business.
  • Henny Portman returns from class with a nice summary of Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) 4.0.
  • Emanuele Passera begins a series on Kanban, with a brief introduction to the terminology.
  • Angela Wick explains the difference between use cases and user stories, and why you should use one or the other but not both.
  • Sandeep Paudel posts a brief user story FAQ. Part one of two.

Applied Leadership

  • Cameron Conaway gets a few ideas about vision from Patti Sanchez, Chief Strategy Officer at Duarte, Inc, a “visual storytelling company” in Silicon Valley.
  • Suzanne Lucas, the Evil HR Lady, explains why hiring is so much more difficult than you might expect.
  • Liane Davey tells us how to deal with chronic complainers.
  • Art Petty explains how to succeed in high-pressure conversations.
  • Allen Ruddock contemplates the nature of motivation.

Pot Pouri

  • Bruce Harpham gives us a comprehensive approach to winning that next promotion.
  • Project Journal has rounded up 30 of the best interview questions to ask of applicants for a project management position.
  • Derek Huether explains how to triage meeting requests.
  • Thomas Carney summarizes six highly regarded productivity systems, and identifies roles that they might work best for (and not).
  • Seth Godin makes the (quality) case for not using free software.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of November 30 – December 6

Balloon SunriseNew project management articles published on the web during the week of November 30 – December 6. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Patti Gilchrist recommends reducing the cost of poor quality with a risk-based testing strategy. And like most good project strategies, it starts at the beginning.
  • Art Petty encourages us to become more discriminating consumers of leadership content – getting away from the “happy talk” and digging into the dirty details.
  • Susanne Madsen details an approach for “up-skilling” an organization’s project managers.

Established Methods

  • Jeff Collins lists his top ten project management thought leaders to follow in 2016.
  • Justin Stoltzfus identifies trends in business intelligence and data analysis for 2016.
  • Todd Williams builds on an earlier post, on avoiding litigation when managing a project on behalf of a customer.
  • Nick Pisano continues his series on a general theory of project management, based on research into complex adaptive systems.
  • Elizabeth Harrin details “most effective practices” in business requirements management.
  • Harry Hall checklists the questions new team members need to have answered.
  • Gina Abudi identifies three challenges uncovered in a survey of managers who lead virtual teams, and strategies to handle them.
  • Martin Coomber demonstrates a few Visio process modeling productivity hacks.

Agile Methods

  • Glen Alleman notes that Agile at scale, in software-intensive systems-of-systems, is a very different Agile from five to eight developers in a room together.
  • Madhavi Ledalla expounds on release planning and release management – two critical techniques for delivering working software in iterations.
  • Esther Derby suggests that the team needs to understand what the product does, from the user’s point of view.
  • Mike Cohn provides an example of how to use a zero-point estimate on a user story.
  • Johanna Rothman starts a series on applying Agile methods to hardware development projects.
  • Reuben Salisbury gives us five reasons why a physical Scrum board beats the one you can access from anywhere, on a variety of devices.

Applied Leadership

  • Eric Johnson provides an executive-level bit of advice: be quick to listen and slow to react.
  • Bruce Harpham summarizes key lessons from “The Truth About Employee Engagement,” by Patrick Lencioni.
  • Colin Ellis identifies five “types” of project managers, based on their observable behaviors.
  • Bertrand Duperrin says that humans must learn to work with robots – not because humans will be replaced, but because collaboration has more potential.
  • Seth Godin notes that it isn’t economically viable (or even possible) to please some percentage of your customers.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Richard Larson on his PMI Global Congress presentation, “Entrepreneurial Business Analysis Practitioner.” Just 17 minutes, safe for work.
  • Jesse Fewell shares a rant: why would you even want to go Agile? It shouldn’t just be “fear of missing out;” you should be seeking transformation. Just five minutes, safe for work.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Marie Longworth on managing remote vendors. Just 18 minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!