New PM Articles for the Week of March 12 – 18

New project management articles published on the web during the week of March 12 – 18. And this week’s video: Mike Clayton provides an excellent explanation of Lean Project Management, as it arose in the context of the Toyota production system. 5 minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Maura Thomas quotes an early (1890) psychology textbook to show how long we’ve been struggling to control the distractions in our life, and what we’ve learned. 6 minutes to read.
  • Chris Clearfield examines a few cases studies that illustrate good and bad handling of a crisis that couldn’t be predicted. 6 minutes to read.
  • Carlos Bueno asks the rhetorical question: Can an artificial intelligence break the law? There are significant legal hazards ahead for machine learning algorithms that can’t “explain” their reasoning. 10 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • John Goodpasture explores a way to make the familiar qualitative risk matrix more rigorous with iso-risk contours and relative scales. 3 minutes to read.
  • Harry Hall explains the new risk strategy cited in the Sixth Edition of the PMBOK, Escalate. 3 minutes to read.
  • Elizabeth Harrin lists eight free or low-cost resources for PM training, templates, and other valuable content. 3 minutes to read.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews John Kleine, Global Manager, Product Strategy & Delivery, at Project Management Institute about the current rules for CCRs and PDUs. Podcast, 18 minutes, safe for work.
  • Jeanne Achille promotes the value of a pilot program when validating the business case for a new solution. 2 minutes to read.
  • Elise Stevens interviews project portfolio management specialist Helen Hull on leading a team of project managers. Podcast, 16 minutes, safe for work.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his list of Agile content, from continuous product discovery in practice to the futility of introducing Agile via command and control to avoiding customer resistance to product changes. 7 outbound links, 3 minutes to scan.
  • Chris Matts starts a series describing the Cotswold Way—an Agile approach to business analysis. 2 minutes to read.
  • Johanna Rothman concludes her six-part series on Agile transformation, with links to all posts at the bottom. 3 minutes to read each, on average.
  • Andy Jordan analyzes a new role: a hybrid of product manager and project manager. 7 minutes to read.
  • Roman Pichler describes two product manager styles to avoid: feature broker and product dictator. 5 minutes to read.
  • Maarten Dalmjin shares seven common mistakes when starting your first Scrum sprint. 7 minutes to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Neil Younger tells about pairing with his recruitment manager—what each of them learned made them more productive and efficient. 5 minutes to read.
  • Ken Blanchard captures the practical essence of servant leadership—lead with your ears. 2 minutes to read.
  • Cody McLain describes President and Five-star General Dwight Eisenhower’s proactive approach to task management. 5 minutes to read.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Parth Shrivastava gives us a quick overview of GDPR. PwC reports that 92% of U.S. companies consider GDPR a top data protection priority. 6 minutes to read.
  • Alex Schladebeck explains why unscripted, exploratory testing is usually a valuable prelude to scripted testing. 6 minutes to read.
  • Pete Houghton makes the case for not always creating a test when a problem is encountered, even in production. 2 minutes to read.
  • Scott Helmers shows a couple of neat tricks that let you associate tabular data and icons with the shapes in a Visio diagram. “This is the software development life cycle …” 4 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Larry Rosen suggests a few ways to reduce the impact of your smartphone (or tablet) on your mental and physical health. 3 minutes to read.
  • Ari Farrow explores three ways to manage work by keeping a sustainable pace. 3 minutes to read.
  • Corrinne Purtill explains the difference between a snafu, a shitshow, and a clusterfuck. No, I’m not making this up and apparently, neither is she. 4 minutes to read.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of March 5 – 11

New project management articles published on the web during the week of March 5 – 11. Daylight Savings Time began in North America today, March 11 but won’t begin until March 25 in the UK and most of Europe. And this week’s video: Chris Pond shows how to generate reports from Microsoft Project. 3 minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Schaun Wheeler: “Most ethical mistakes come from the inability to foresee consequences, not the inability to tell right from wrong.” 8 minutes to read.
  • Bill Taylor notes the passing of Roger Bannister, who ran the mile in under four minutes by ignoring conventional wisdom. There’s a lesson here for those who would lead change. 4 minutes to read.
  • Ephrat Livni interviews futurist Richard Watson on how to be better informed—start by avoiding the news. Television journalism is to journalism as television personality is to personality. 3 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin extracts actionable ideas from 15 women in project management that she’s interviewed over the years. 8 minutes to read, with links to each of the interviews and the LinkedIn profiles of each project manager.
  • Mike Clayton offers a primer in change management for project managers. 6 minutes to read.
  • Doug Thorpe revisits David Gleicher’s 1960’s era model for resistance to change. 4 minutes to read.
  • Guilherme Caloba shares an approach to integrating qualitative and quantitative risk analyses. 6 minutes to read.
  • Sai Prasad shows how to display the MS Project timeline as a countdown, in under a minute.
  • Brad Egeland walks us through the steps to replace the project manager n a failed project. 5 minutes to read.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from the Agile Fluency model to why projects are always late to choosing your battles. 2 minutes to scan, 7 outbound links.
  • John Yorke contemplates the notion of delivering value in two posts, the second one applying Eli Goldratt’s observations on how measurement influences behavior. 10 minutes to read both.
  • Johanna Rothman notes that traditional measurements focus on resource efficiency rather than flow efficiency. There are better alternatives. 5 minutes to read.
  • Michael Stahl offers some “test cases” for the practical application of ethics in software testing. 7 minutes to read.
  • The Clever PM refines our approach to retrospectives as a key component of continuous improvement.
  • Kiron Bondale asks the rhetorical question: shouldn’t we all be agile project managers? Just over a minute to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Henny Portman reviews Tribal Unity: Getting from Teams to Tribes by creating a one team culture. 2 minutes to read.
  • Bruce Benson reflects on how poor management practices often start at the top. 3 minutes to read.
  • Deborah Riegel tells us how to solicit negative feedback when your manager doesn’t want to give it. Lessons here for managers, too. 4 minutes to read.
  • Cory Foy presents a purpose-based strategy alignment model. 3 minutes to read.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Hanan Benold explains how to communicate technical debt to non-technical decision makers. 4 minutes to read.
  • Michael Solomon tells how to manage penetration testing like a project (which it is). 5 minutes to read.
  • Paramita Ghosh notes the evolving use cases for the Internet of Things. 5 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Leigh Espy shares a simple technique to help deal with nervousness before and during a presentation. 5 minutes to read.
  • Gina Abudi catalogs some of the challenges in managing remote workers. 2 minutes to read.
  • Mike Vardy interviews Dr. Mary Lamia on her new book, What Motivates Getting Things Done. And she never heard of David Allen’s book before writing it! Podcast, 26 minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of January 29 – February 4

New project management articles published on the web during the week of January 29 – February 4. And this week’s video: Personal Kanban author Jim Benson introduces a new series of videos—The Agile Heretic. “We’ve gone from Death Marches to Death Sprints.” Sounds interesting! 7 minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Tsedal Neeley expounds on swift trust, passable trust, direct knowledge, reflected knowledge, and how we build trust with colleagues we rarely see. 5 minutes to read.
  • Jesse Lynn Stoner explains how to make an effective apology and increase trust. 3 minutes to read.
  • Henny Portman reviews Patrick Lencioni’s The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, a classic work on getting to collaboration by beginning with creating trust. 3 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • Balloon LandingHarry Hall explains the what, why, and when of evaluating project risks. 3 minutes to read.
  • John Goodpasture unpacks the concept of coupling to explain why, even in an Agile approach, dependencies can be reduced with a proper temporary architecture. 2 minutes to read.
  • Laura Barnard notes that Agile and PMO are not mutually exclusive concepts. In fact, they can complement each other. 7 minutes to read.
  • Elizabeth Harrin curates her list of recommended project management certification training courses, for PMI and PRINCE2 certifications. 5 minutes to read, 6 outbound links.
  • Bonnie Biafore and John Riopel have some suggestions for building your organization’s methodology. 3 minutes to read.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Marisa Silva on positioning the PMO to deliver impactful value. Podcast, 18 minutes, safe for work.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly Agile roundup, from useless Agile metrics to big room planning, to the case for fewer product managers. 3 minutes to read, 7 outbound links.
  • Dan North coins a new term: SWARMing, Scaling Without a Religious Methodology. 17 minutes to read.
  • Kiron Bondale looks at the leadership problem of Agile adoption—organizational adoption of an agile mindset. 2 minutes to read.
  • Tom Cagley has collected a few metrics that can determine if our objectives in adopting agile methods are being met. 4 minutes to read.
  • Mike Clayton explains Kanban, from its roots in Toyota’s JIT manufacturing system to adoption by the Agile movement. Video, 6 minutes to watch; safe for work.
  • Paul Merrill explains why you won’t be able to convert your entire testing team to use automated test tools. 6 minutes to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Balloon Over The RoofArt Petty recaps an anecdote that illustrates how to handle an attack on your credibility during a meeting. 5 minutes to read.
  • Bob Tarne notes that psychological safety—the perceived ability to push back on a management request—is created by managers, not team members. 2 minutes to read.
  • Doug Thorpe receives an Email from a former colleague that was “less than flattering,” and notes that leaders can’t win over everyone. 4 minutes to read.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Jeff Furman tips his hat to Mary Ann Jensen, the neglected co-author of the update to Dr. Bruce Tuckman’s Stages of Team Development Dr. Jensen is now a psychologist in private practice. 2 minutes to read.
  • Amy Hamilton recommends some small behavior changes that might help you to avoid a cybersecurity breach—at home, at work, and en route. 3 minutes to read.
  • Julian Strachan says that it’s OK to be techno-skeptical—after all, a technology does not control how it is used. 4 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Eamonn McGuinness describes a model for handling those little interruptions and distractions that pop up throughout the day. A minute to read, or a video at 3 minutes; safe for work.
  • Leigh Espy shares her tips for getting things done in a timeframe a little closer to your original estimate. 3 minutes to read.
  • John Yorke notes numerous studies that say there is an inverse relationship between hours worked and productivity. 8 minutes to read.
  • Nils Salzgeber argues that the key to higher productivity is to manage your energy, rather than your time. 19 minutes to read.

Enjoy!