New PM Articles for the Week of April 22 – 28

New project management articles published on the web during the week of April 22 – 28. And this week’s video: Mike Clayton explains the difference between UK and US definitions of a work package and, by extension, a work breakdown structure. 4 minutes, safe for work.

Business Acumen and Strategy

  • Mike Murphy reports that Alphabet subsidiary Wing has received FAA approval to begin rolling out drone deliveries to customers. Meanwhile, Amazon just announced that Prime customers will get free one-day delivery. 4 minutes to read both
  • John Naughton asks, “We test and control drugs, so why do we freely allow the spread of potentially harmful products by unregulated entrepreneurs?” 4 minutes to read.
  • Peggy Choi predicts the next gig economy opportunity: knowledge on demand. And the EU has passed legislation setting minimum rights for workers in the gig economy. 6 minutes to read both.

Managing Projects

  • Harry Hall coaches us on using a rigorous method for selecting project risk responses. Highly recommended! 5 minutes to read.
  • Pat Weaver shares a new paper, Knowledge Management is more than Information Management. 8 pages, 12 minutes or so to read.
  • Dale Howard shows how to analyze a cost variance in MS Project. 6 minutes to read.
  • Kiron Bondale tells us how to manage a project that isn’t a high priority for the organization but still needs to succeed. 2 minutes to read.
  • Jason Westland explains corporate governance—the rules and processes of interaction and decision-making—and how it impacts your project. 5 minutes to read.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy shares a comprehensive system for continuing to succeed throughout your project management career: relentless self-development. 10 minutes to read.

Managing Software Development

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from dubious maturity models to dubious staffing ideas to legacy tech. 7 outbound links, 3 minutes to read.
  • Johanna Rothman continues her series on product roles. Here are Part 4 and Part 5, with at least one more to come. 7 minutes to read both.
  • Tony Ho Tran tutors us on following a six-stage UX design process. 12 minutes to read.
  • Jesper Ottosen says we should expand beyond the default notion that a system under test consists of just the software being developed. 3 minutes to read.
  • Jane Hurst lists six of the leading SaaS project management tools for software project management. 5 minutes to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Chris Croft talks us through handling aggressive behavior at work (without responding in kind). 4 minutes to read.
  • Leigh Espy shows us an advanced version of an old idea-generating technique: starbursting brainstorming. 4 minutes to read.
  • Daniel Miessler explains six performance measurement buzzwords and acronyms that effective managers know how to use correctly. 3 minutes to read.
  • Greg Satell tells us when it benefits companies to collaborate in order to compete better. 5 minutes to read.

Research and Insights

  • Anne Quito reports on Arnav Kapur’s live public demo of AlterEgo, a wearable device that allows users to access devices without typing or using their voice. 4 minutes to read.
  • Samuel Bocetta updates us on Triton, a form of malware that targets industrial equipment. Think nuclear plants and oil pipelines. 5 minutes to read.
  • David Balaban reviews the efficacy of some of the widely-used tools to defend against cyber-attacks. 6 minutes to read.
  • The folks at Continuum Security present three solid reasons to adopt a threat modeling approach to cybersecurity. “To catch a thief…” 8 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Abby Wolfe explains why your next job search should begin with finding companies, not roles. And then tells us how to proceed. 8 minutes to read.
  • Adam Levin says that Email is the main communication tool for 95% of businesses. It’s time to re-think that. 4 minutes to read.
  • Jack Vale points out the downside of messaging apps: another vehicle for harassment, bullying, and drama. 3 minutes to read.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of April 15 – 21

New project management articles published on the web during the week of April 15 – 21. And this week’s video: Mike Clayton explains the PMI, APM, and Prince2 definitions of an issue, and what project managers should do to manage them. 5 minutes, safe for work.

Business Acumen and Strategy

  • Susan Lund and Jacques Bughin describe the changing nature of globalization, driven by flows of information and data. 8 minutes to read.
  • Stephen Bungay debunks five popular myths about strategy. 6 minutes to read.
  • Brad Plizga argues that human rights must always come before business. It’s time for Big Tech to say no to oppressive governments.

Managing Projects

  • Valaiporn Niramai does a deep dive on what it takes to organize and manage a transformation project. 7 minutes to read.
  • Sarah Hoban explains the fundamentals of project branding. 3 minutes to read, or listen to her podcast: 6 minutes, safe for work.
  • Nenad Trajkovski suggests that we consider what type of task to use, based on constraints and drivers, before we start up MS Project. 2 minutes to read.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Laura Dallas Burford on how to become a project management consultant. Podcast, 33 minutes, safe for work.
  • The Nice Folks at Clarizen explain one of my favorite methodologies: Gap Analysis. Loved by business analysts and implementation project managers everywhere. 3 minutes to read.
  • Tapera Mangezi tells how to maintain positive stakeholder engagement during business analysis processes. 3 minutes to read.

Managing Software Development

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from the merits of less communication to the demerits of A/B testing to multiple team Scrum. 7 outbound links, 3 minutes to read.
  • Tamás Török gives us an executive summary of Coding Sans Software Development Trends 2019 annual report. Full report and data available for download. 7 minutes to read.
  • Doug Bradbury suggests a less risky alternative to a major re-write of your current software product in order to exploit a new market. 3 minutes to read.
  • Barry Weston observes some of the challenges in testing AI solutions. 4 minutes to read.
  • Brendan Wovchko coaches us on the choice between using Scum and using Kanban. 4 minutes to read.
  • Kristin Jackovny, professional tester and former professional organizer, tells us how to organize for testing success. 5 minutes to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Michael Lopp considers the leadership responsibilities of meetings. 4 minutes to read.
  • Melody Wilding coaches us on managing the complainers who come to our meetings. You can give people a voice without losing control. 4 minutes to read.
  • Pawel Brodzinski reflects on the co-dependent nature of autonomy and transparency: you can’t have one without the other. 7 minutes to read.
  • Leigh Espy shares a few simple things you can do to endear yourself to your project team. It’s easier to lead people who like you. 4 minutes to read.

Research and Insights

  • Greg Satell gives us an executive summary of quantum computing. My take: they aren’t faster general-purpose computers. 5 minutes to read.
  • MIT Technology Review recaps what we’ve learned in the 20 years since the first distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. 6 minutes to read.
  • Raconteur shares an infographic that illustrates how much new data is created in a single day. I wouldn’t call the 4,000 terabytes generated on Facebook useful, but it’s data. A minute or two to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Jenny Foss suggests we send a letter of interest to that company we’d really like to work for. Even if they don’t have a position open. 5 minutes to read.
  • Mayo Oshin looks at the science of how music affects your productivity. Sad news: although music reduces anxiety, lyrics reduce mental performance. 5 minutes to read the rest.
  • Lauren Adley on motivation: “It’s easier to get things done when we’re driven, but it’s not a necessary precondition in order to do so.” 4 minutes to read.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of April 8 – 14

New project management articles published on the web during the week of April 8 – 14. And this week’s video: Kristen Pressner, Global Head of HR at a multinational firm, talks about discovering her own bias against women in leadership positions. Our brain shortcuts are so subtle that we might not even realize that they are operating. 9 minutes, safe for work.

Business Acumen and Strategy

  • Jen Kirby explains the details behind the new Brexit October 31 deadline. Still, many companies are leaving the UK and even a Remain vote won’t bring them back.
  • Jade Emmons give us the executive summary for PwC’s 22nd CEO survey. They are worried about some very interesting things. 4 minutes to read.
  • Eshe Nelson recaps the latest World Economic Outlook from the IMF—we’re entering a global slow-down, with national and regional variations. 3 minutes to read.

Managing Projects

  • Mike Clayton explains a new concept introduced by PMI: Project Management Technology Quotient (PMTQ), “a [project manager’s] ability to adapt, manage and integrate technology based on the needs of the organization or project at hand.” 16 minutes to read.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Ruth Pierce, who tells us how to spot the character strengths of our project team members. Podcast, 29 minutes, safe for work.
  • Safford Black gets us started on writing formulas for custom fields in MS Project. 3 minutes to read.
  • John Goodpasture notes that most risks facing a project are not actively managed. And that’s not a bad thing. 2 minutes to read.
  • Kiron Bondale tells us how to proactively manage dependencies in agile approaches. 2 minutes to read.
  • The nice folks at Clarizen list the general responsibilities of a project sponsor (your mileage may vary). 3 minutes to read.

Managing Software Development

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from strategies for complexity to whether Agile RIO is a (provable) thing to flow and value in product development. 7 outbound links, 3 minutes to read.
  • Scott Kirkwood describes the redesign of Reddit to make it more welcoming without driving away the millions of long-time users. 8 minutes to read.
  • Henny Portman reviews An Executive’s Guide to Disciplined Agile, by Scott Ambler and Mark Lines. 5 minutes to read.
  • Johanna Rothman continues her series on product roles, exploring the product value team and cross-functional team organization. 7 minutes to read both.
  • Peter Pito expounds on a rigorous approach to estimating the duration required for software development, including confidence. 16 minutes to read.
  • Scott Ambler explores four alternative approaches to creating a release plan. 6 minutes to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Eduards Sizovs argues that “great developers are raised, not hired.” 4 minutes to read.
  • George Pitagorsky tells us how to overcome cognitive bias so we can make more effective decisions. 5 minutes to read.
  • Dan Rockwell shared a “reading list” that included a few YouTube videos in with the books and articles, and the comments filled with other suggested reads. 3 minutes to read it all.

Research and Insights

  • Michelle Knight takes the mystery out of data architecture. Good diagram, better explanation. 6 minutes to read.
  • Meredith Broussard says that self-driving cars will be considered unthinkable 50 years from now. Not the technology, but the absence of human authority. 3 minutes to read.
  • David Baker reviews the market and the technology: there’s nothing better than lithium-ion batteries coming anytime soon. 5 minutes to read.
  • Gene Tracy considers the increasing shift of what we know and do to computers, and what that implies about what we’ll need to remember and know how to do. 6 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Ana Ferriera explains how the Doist design team—8 people spread across six countries—makes it work across time zones. 12 minutes to read.
  • Jack Vale tells us how to establish and maintain a “multi-hyphen” career. Jack of all trades and working in several at once? 3 minutes to read.
  • Stacy Wonder suggests some unusual ways to break through creative blocks, get out of a rut, and shake things up. 4 minutes to read.

Enjoy!