New PM Articles for the Week of December 21 – 27

SightseersNew project management articles published on the web during the week of December 21 – 27. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Rich Maltzman reports on some notable progress in achieving a shift to sustainability, by multi-national corporations. Start 2016 with green eyes!
  • Matthew Heusser interviews Tara Nicholson on IT program and project management at Scripps Network, home of HGTV and other lifestyle media outlets. Ask This Old House is Agile?
  • Penelope Trunk summarizes research into negotiating strategies. Lots of links, so be prepared to Pocket them for later. You use Pocket, right?

Established Methods

  • Bruce Harpham interviews Joanne Hohenadel, senior project manager at University Health Network in Toronto. They won the 2015 PMI Award for Project Excellence – North America.
  • Dave Prior interviews Shane Hastie, John D. Cook, and Troy Magennis on a range of Agile and project management topics. Just 42 minutes, safe for work.
  • Wanda Curlee uses concentric circle diagrams to illustrate a portfolio management decision. Excellent – simple graphics that clearly show a complex comparison!
  • Glen Alleman: “Like value, waste is rarely defined by those performing the work. It’s defined by those paying for the work.”
  • Jeff Collins provides executive-level input to the activity of reducing risk to projects.
  • Mark Lukens makes the case for incremental improvements as less destabilizing than huge, sweeping initiatives.
  • Robert Charette shares a lesson learned from pulling together a report on a decade’s worth of failed projects: We don’t do post-mortems very well.
  • Ryan Ogilvie uses an Indiana Jones metaphor to point out that root cause analysis isn’t all that’s required to get to a solution.
  • Thomas Carney covers the state of the art in cross-browser testing.

Agile Methods

  • Dmitri Khanine continues his series on moving from gathering requirements to user experience engineering.
  • Mike Griffiths not only updated his PMI-ACP Exam Prep book, he updated the sample test questions. Here, he shares 20 of them.
  • Johanna Rothman is asking for reader input before updating her book, “Manage Your Project Portfolio: Increase your capacity and finish more projects.”
  • Judith Mary Khan lists nearly two dozen things to not do when moving to Agile methods.
  • Vishal Venkatesan outlines how they scaled Agile at Spotify.
  • Renee, Tony, and Craig get together for a wide-ranging discussion on Agile in Australia, Etsy, Feedly, Sanjiv Augustine’s new book, and much more. Just over an hour, safe for work.

Applied Leadership

  • Art Petty reminds us that results are not directly related to effort.
  • Seth Godin notes that exceptional results come from abandoning the need for the approval of our peers. Try not to think of Donald Trump when you read that …
  • Michael Lopp opens up the draft “Management Glossary” for the forthcoming third edition of Managing Humans.
  • Bertrand Duperrin opens a discussion of employee experience, the consumerization of worklife, engagement, and productivity. Yes, “the employee as a customer” is a thing.
  • Betcher Robert says that we can reduce the number of code defects by 50%, by holding developers and the business accountable.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of December 14 – 20

Hot Air BalloonNew project management articles published on the web during the week of December 14 – 20. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • John Goodpasture explains the Hybrid Operating Principle: Agile projects are simultaneously strategically stationary and tactically iterative and emergent.
  • Adam Shostack derives design governance lessons from a presentation by the engineer responsible for the Death Star’s exhaust system. May the Force be aligned with your strategic initiatives!
  • Peter Saddington describes two keys to effective communication: active engagement and active listening. Side note: in addition to being a Scrum consultant, Peter has an MA in Counseling.

Established Methods

  • Braden Kelly unveils his Visual Project Charter, a poster-sized format for capturing and/or sharing project information in a team meeting. Better than a Word template?
  • Diana Eskander covers the process of stakeholder management.
  • Lynda Bourne addresses the meaning of corporate social responsibility, sustainability, and the triple bottom line, from a stakeholder’s perspective.
  • Susanne Madsen gets us up to speed on managing change, using John Kotter’s eight-step model.
  • Matthew Squair reviews the use of “Incredible” as a qualitative likelihood for risk management, when all the swans have been confirmed to be white.
  • Ryan Ogilvie shares a colleague’s story about an off-the-shelf application that was too heavily modified to ever be maintained.
  • Kailash Awati contemplates evolution and obsolescence, as they apply to enterprise architecture. Biology is destiny, even in metaphors.

Agile Methods

  • Johanna Rothman continues her series on Agile methods for hardware development.
  • Bob Tarne finds Gall’s Law reflected in certain Agile principles.
  • Robert Galen describes user stories as a “lifecycle of conversations,” using the example of building a better mousetrap.
  • Paul Goddard and Geoff Watts list ten tips for running an effective retrospective.
  • M.W. Settlemire posts an academic-looking treatise, “Effective use of Kanban for monitoring and controlling low-complexity projects in a high-volume project environment.”
  • Glen Alleman breaks down the definition of value into several units of measure.

Work Is Not A Place

  • Aaron Smith interviews leadership trainer Brady Wilson on his new book, “Beyond Engagement,” and workplace exhaustion.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Jesse Fewell on his 2015 PMI Global Congress presentation, “Can you hear me now?” Just 23 minutes, safe for work.
  • Harry Hall lays out a plan for aching your project management career dreams.
  • Penelope Trunk helps her ten year old son realize that his job is becoming obsolete, that it happens to everyone, and he just needs to find a new one. Hilarious!
  • Seth Godin takes a look at the economics of smart phones, where the perpetual interruptions of beeping and vibrating trigger opportunity costs.

Trends and the New Year

  • Elizabeth Harrin shares her project management career retrospective for 2015.
  • Mike Cohn proposes 21 New Year’s resolutions for ScrumMasters. Definitely get more fiber. And cut back on the sodium.
  • Ramin Sayar notes five data analytics trends that will impact us in the coming year.
  • Per Holmlund has a few suggestions for improving teamwork in 2016.

 Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of November 30 – December 6

Balloon SunriseNew project management articles published on the web during the week of November 30 – December 6. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Patti Gilchrist recommends reducing the cost of poor quality with a risk-based testing strategy. And like most good project strategies, it starts at the beginning.
  • Art Petty encourages us to become more discriminating consumers of leadership content – getting away from the “happy talk” and digging into the dirty details.
  • Susanne Madsen details an approach for “up-skilling” an organization’s project managers.

Established Methods

  • Jeff Collins lists his top ten project management thought leaders to follow in 2016.
  • Justin Stoltzfus identifies trends in business intelligence and data analysis for 2016.
  • Todd Williams builds on an earlier post, on avoiding litigation when managing a project on behalf of a customer.
  • Nick Pisano continues his series on a general theory of project management, based on research into complex adaptive systems.
  • Elizabeth Harrin details “most effective practices” in business requirements management.
  • Harry Hall checklists the questions new team members need to have answered.
  • Gina Abudi identifies three challenges uncovered in a survey of managers who lead virtual teams, and strategies to handle them.
  • Martin Coomber demonstrates a few Visio process modeling productivity hacks.

Agile Methods

  • Glen Alleman notes that Agile at scale, in software-intensive systems-of-systems, is a very different Agile from five to eight developers in a room together.
  • Madhavi Ledalla expounds on release planning and release management – two critical techniques for delivering working software in iterations.
  • Esther Derby suggests that the team needs to understand what the product does, from the user’s point of view.
  • Mike Cohn provides an example of how to use a zero-point estimate on a user story.
  • Johanna Rothman starts a series on applying Agile methods to hardware development projects.
  • Reuben Salisbury gives us five reasons why a physical Scrum board beats the one you can access from anywhere, on a variety of devices.

Applied Leadership

  • Eric Johnson provides an executive-level bit of advice: be quick to listen and slow to react.
  • Bruce Harpham summarizes key lessons from “The Truth About Employee Engagement,” by Patrick Lencioni.
  • Colin Ellis identifies five “types” of project managers, based on their observable behaviors.
  • Bertrand Duperrin says that humans must learn to work with robots – not because humans will be replaced, but because collaboration has more potential.
  • Seth Godin notes that it isn’t economically viable (or even possible) to please some percentage of your customers.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Richard Larson on his PMI Global Congress presentation, “Entrepreneurial Business Analysis Practitioner.” Just 17 minutes, safe for work.
  • Jesse Fewell shares a rant: why would you even want to go Agile? It shouldn’t just be “fear of missing out;” you should be seeking transformation. Just five minutes, safe for work.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Marie Longworth on managing remote vendors. Just 18 minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!