New PM Articles for the Week of June 13 – 19

New project management articles published on the web during the week of June 13 – 19. And this week’s video: Simone Giertz explains how she became the Queen of Shitty Robots. Less than two minutes, generally safe for work, and inspiring for those with imagination, but neither technical nor social skills.

Must read!

  • Thomas Carney has rounded up six diverse, well-qualified opinions on the #NoEstimates debate. Well worth reading, and even more worth thinking about.
  • Kailash Awati tells the story before the story – a parable about setting business expectations before beginning a data science project. Just 5 minutes, safe for work.
  • Kathleen O’Connor interviews Jim Dewald on his upcoming book, “Achieving Longevity: How Great Firms Prosper Through Entrepreneurial Thinking.”

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin points out the ramifications the Brexit vote will have for businesses and the project managers who will have to implement all those contingency plans.
  • Harry Hall notes the steps to take when you have to replace a team member on a project.
  • Kenneth Ashe recommends strategic thinking as an approach to identify and assess process improvements.
  • Kimberly Wamba expounds on best practices in managing uncertainty and ambiguity.
  • Oscar Berg counts off the reasons why corporate investments in IT commonly fail.
  • Ruairi O’Donnellan introduces Brightwork’s new Resource Management Pocket Guide. It’s a free download, once you provide your contact information.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Susanne Madsen on how to manage a demanding workload. Just 24 minutes, safe for work.

Agile Methods

  • Derek Huether notes, “we need a lot fewer Agile police and a lot more Agile ambassadors.”
  • Henny Portman reviews “Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives,” by Ben Linders and Linus Goncalves. Includes links to two related YouTube videos.
  • Martin Aziz describes the Retro Game, a board game for teams prone to sitting around the table and asking each other, “Well, what do you think?”
  • Ryan Ripley interviews Dave West on the future of Scrum. Just 19 minutes, safe for work.
  • Jayaprakash Prabhakar defines two alternatives to TDD: acceptance test-driven development and exploratory test-driven development.
  • Dave Prior interviews Katrina Coker about selecting an accountability partner to help you reach your personal and professional goals. Just 33 minutes, safe for work.
  • Shoaib Ahmed identifies four key part of any organization’s transition to Agile.

Applied Leadership

  • Art Petty rants abut managers who don’t take on the responsibility to identify and develop talent.
  • Liane Davey notes that talent management can bring out the worst in bad managers.
  • Suzanne Lucas explains how managers can use a goal-based process to train their employees for success.
  • Gina Abudi reflects on what to address when considering an employee for a supervisory role.
  • Seth Godin reminds us that it takes guts to recruit people who are better than we are. But it’s necessary in order to raise the average.
  • John Goodpasture contemplates the eccentric employee, who should not be managed but should be allowed to fiddle a bit.
  • Lisette Sutherland discusses the challenges people and companies face when they transition to remote work. Just 16 minutes, safe for work.
  • Bruce Harpham opines on why most people fail at making career changes.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of May 30 – June 5

New project management articles published on the web during the week of May 30 – June 5. And this week’s video: A parody of lousy incident management, “BP Spills Coffee.” Three minutes, not safe for work (especially if you work at BP or Haliburton).

Must read!

  • Fadi Shawtah describes political risk management for cross-border operations, which includes exposure to everything from currency risk to sovereign risk, to transfer risk.
  • Michael Kassner quotes Michael Hayden, former director of the CIA and NSA, on vulnerability management: “They’re going to get in. Get over it.” Focus on managing consequences!
  • Nancy Settle-Murphy addresses techniques for preventing culture clashes for “mixed” teams, after a merger.

Established Methods

  • Deb Schaeffer demonstrates how to get a better status on project activities by asking additional questions.
  • John Goodpasture walks us through the project balance sheet. Not a financial view, but a way to show how resources are being allocated to accomplish project goals.
  • Coert Visser explains the “circle technique,” a white board and Post-It Notes approach to analyzing goals, progress already made, and actions still required.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Fernando Remolina, who explains how to create a work breakdown structure. Just 22 minutes, safe for work.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy walks us through the steps to use the WBS efficiently.
  • Jody Markopoulos describes GE’s new approach, “Contemporary project management.”

Agile Methods

  • Mike Cohn describes a simple way to get a shared understanding of the level of effort represented by a story point before the team plays planning poker.
  • Johanna Rothman introduces the concept of Rubber Duck Debugging, which is explaining a problem to someone who doesn’t understand it and isn’t in management.
  • Muhammed Irfan Azam explains how Clear Code Day can put the focus on the Scrum team, rather than the ScrumMaster of product owner.
  • Bob Tarne describes the “sponsored user” – someone assigned to the development team when you need to hear the voice of the customer at all times.
  • Samantha Webb introduces the #pubretro movement, not necessarily because you should be drinking, but because getting out of the office might make all the difference.
  • Ryan Ripley interviews Jason Womack, author of “Get Momentum.” Just 15 minutes, safe for work.
  • Tony Ponton and Craig Smith interview James Shore, author of “The Art of Agile Development.” Just 43 minutes, safe for work.

Applied Leadership

  • Art Petty explores the Least Bad Option – which usually involves exposing the decision maker to greater risk.
  • David Bicknell excerpts a few examples from “The Dead Presidents’ Guide to Project Management,” by Jim Johnson.
  • Seth Godin says reading more blogs will help us become “smarter, more effective and more engaged in what’s going on.” If you are reading this, you agree.
  • Peter Landau posts the annual ProjectManager.com roundup of the best project management and leadership blogs.

See Tech Like an Exec

  • Mary Shacklett bullet points the critical considerations for running an internet of things project.
  • Tara Seals trots out some sobering statistics: information security issues are slowing or halting the majority of Big Data projects.
  • George Leopold reports on the next big constraint for Big Data: legal hassles, like the recent tussle between Apple and the FBI.
  • Jesus Rodriguez reports on the business side of artificial intelligence – not the applications, but the race to secure market share and future profits.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of April 4 – 10

New project management articles published on the web during the week of April 4 – 10. And this week’s video: the first stage of the SpaceX Falcon 9 successfully lands on a recovery ship.

Must read!

  • Elizabeth Harrin walks us through her checklist for taking over a project already in flight.
  • Rich Maltzman reports on a project in Colorado that is taking food waste out of the land fill and converting it to energy, compost, and liquid fertilizer, by emulating digestion.
  • Harry Hall recaps each of the risk response strategies for positive and negative risks.

Established Methods

  • Anna Krachey, Nicole Nagel, and Jonathan Lewis extol the virtues of designing in a “War room,” a la Dr. Strangelove.
  • John Goodpasture sticks tongue in cheek to examine our evolving attitude toward failure.
  • Angela Wick looks at two sources of project pressure: tight timelines and a pre-determined solution.
  • Tejasvi Addagada explores ways to integrate risk management principles with data governance.
  • Colin Ellis debunks the notion of “best practices” in project management.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Naomi Caietti on managing stakeholder expectations. Just 15 minutes, safe for work.
  • Bruce Benson on automation: “Every key piece of management and decision-making software I ever developed and used was first a manual process that I personally did.”
  • Glen Alleman copies us on his systems engineering reference book list.

Agile Methods

  • Dave Prior interviews the coolest man in the Agile community – Woody Zuill – on mob programming. Almost an hour, safe for work.
  • Johanna Rothman explores some Agile solutions for geographically distributed teams.
  • Mike Cohn has some recommendations for the Sprint summary document, from content to audience.
  • Nick Schaden answers the question, “How do you structure your design team?”
  • Shalu Tyagi recounts how selected Agile methods were implemented for business functions with a regular operating rhythm: HR, administration, and so on.
  • Craig Smith and Tony Ponton conduct random vox pop interviews at Agile Australia. Just 31 minutes, safe for work.

Applied Leadership

  • Suzanne Lucas makes the case for emotional intelligence being more useful than a high IQ.
  • Alfred Stallion outlines the steps to take in improving your public speaking skills.
  • Michael Girdler reviews some basic approaches for overcoming resistance to change.
  • Eduardo Binda Zane, author of “Effective Decision Making,” looks at applying creativity in business and tells us that brainstorming is overrated.
  • Seth Godin reminds us that we are more powerful than we realize.
  • Adam Shostack explains why the information security slogan, “Think like an attacker,” isn’t actionable.
  • David Barrett interviews Roy Osing, author of “Be Different or Be Dead,” on strategic planning. Just 40 minutes, safe for work.
  • Jeff Collins recommends his five favorite project management podcasts.

Enjoy!