New PM Articles for the Week of November 13 – 19

New project management articles published on the web during the week of November 13 – 19. And this week’s video: David Dunning (of the Dunning-Kruger Effect) explains why incompetent people think they’re amazing. 5 minutes, safe for work.

Must read (or Listen)!

  • Bethany Marz Crystal says that the way to battle sexism and harassment is by improving the social feedback loop—call out the behaviors when they happen. 4 minutes to read.
  • Todd Williams interprets recent statistics that paint a dismal picture of corporate failure to execute on strategy and goals. 4 minutes to read.
  • Ryan Ogilvie notes that simply asking for feedback at service completion doesn’t help if you haven’t got a strategy to manage and act on that feedback. 3 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin explains how to use graphics, pictures, graphs, and charts to communicate project information. 5 minutes to read, with a link to her white paper on the subject.
  • Erik van Hurk explains why we should set the Status Date and automatically update the project schedule when US MS Project. 5 minutes to read.
  • Harry Hall tutors us on planning for project risk management. 2 minutes to read.
  • Kiron Bondale suggests that we listen for the Cassandras, those subject matter experts who warn of impending risks and issues, even if they seem unlikely. 3 minutes to read.
  • Nilanjan Kar makes the case for integrating information security management into the PMBOK Guide. 12 minutes to read.
  • Glen Alleman clarifies why independent cost estimating is valid, even when performed by someone who won’t be party to execution. 3 minutes to read.
  • Nick Pisano points out the difference between earned value management and cash flow analysis in project management. 5 minutes to read.

Agile Methods

  • Agile

    Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly Agile roundup, from a Jeff Patton lecture to the problem with Scrum to brilliant jerks and the immorality of addicting users. 8 outbound links, 2 minutes to browse.

  • Dave Prior interviews Jurgen Appelo on his new crowd-funded app/platform project: Agility Scales. Video, 18 minutes, safe for work.
  • Jerry Doucett shares a litmus test for getting your organization on track to being Agile (as opposed to doing Agile). 7 minutes to read.
  • John Yorke describes the zone of acceptance—the collection of tasks that each team member believes is a part of their job—and how to extend it in a self-organizing team. 6 minutes to read.
  • Tamás Török notes the importance of knowledge transfer in a software development team and describes four complementary techniques for sharing the learnings. 6 minutes to read.
  • Tom Cagley interviews Johanna Rothman on creating a successful Agile project. 30 minutes, safe for work.
  • Mike Cohn explains why it’s important to have a consistent sprint duration. 3 minutes to read.
  • Poornima Vijayashanker and Leslie Yang discuss product debt and why you should pay it down with every release. Video, 6 minutes, safe for work.

Applied Leadership

  • Cesar Abeid and Traci Duez talk about getting to self-leadership. Podcast, 28 minutes, safe for work.
  • Mike Clayton gets into the details of how to manage the transition when a team member leaves your project. 9 minutes to read.
  • Alyse Kalish gets advice from Katia Beauchamp, CEO of Birchbox, on how to make the best use of advice—as opposed to getting someone to make the decision for you. 3 minutes to read.
  • Chris Rainey interviews Suzanne Lucas, the Evil HR Lady, who says,” We don’t have a talent shortage, we have a training shortage.” Video, 32 minutes, safe for work.

Working and the Workplace

  • Brad Feld asks the question: Do you reduce stress for others or increase it? 2 minutes to read.
  • Scott Berkun explains the pay to stress ratio: “You can always earn more money, but you cannot earn more time.” 3 minutes to read.
  • Shayna Hodkin posts her occasional advice column, answering “how do I ask for a raise” and “how do I handle hating my job?” 6 minutes to read.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of October 30 – November 5

New project management articles published on the web during the week of October 30 – November 5. Note that Daylight Savings Time ended in North and Central America. And this week’s video: Jesse Fewell shares an excited video selfie from the PMI Global Conference in Chicago, following the launch of the Agile Practice Guide. A new era is dawning – PMI and the Agile Alliance have created non-commercial, methodology-agnostic guidelines for tailoring Agile methods to the work to be done.  5 minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Michael Simmons reveals the secret to Thomas Edison’s success: the 10,000-experiment rule. “Deliberate experimentation is more important than deliberate practice.” 10 minutes to read.
  • Valerie Senyk shares some observations on what it takes to teach well. 3 minutes to read.
  • Nathan Kinch predicts that one of the outcomes of the GDPR will be closer collaboration between designers and attorneys. Privacy by design is a requirement. 6 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • Kiron Bondale defends the use of the digraph as a risk communication tool. 2 minutes to read.
  • Harry Hall describes the steps to take in right-sizing your risk management plan.
  • Glen Alleman reinforces the concepts in an old post: Process is King. Activity must be guided to efficiently achieve goals. 3 minutes to read.
  • Bruce Garrod points out the process changes in each knowledge area of the PMBOK 6th 3 minutes to read.
  • Sam Huffman explains the best practice for entering task durations in MS Project. Less than 2 minutes to read.
  • John Goodpasture quotes Yuval Harari in caveating the predictive value of the past project history and metrics kept by every PMO. Just about a minute to read.
  • Elizabeth Harrin conducts a wide-ranging 22-minute video interview with Jon Clay, President of PMI UK. Or you can read the transcript in about 14 minutes.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly Agile round-up, from Agile experiments to Agile misconceptions, to starting stand-ups on time. 8 outbound links, 2 minutes to browse.
  • Adam Palmer puts story points and relative sizing into perspective using pumpkins. 2 minutes to read.
  • Joel Bancroft-Connors and his invisible gorilla, Hogarth, introduce an enterprise Scrum simulation game using Legos. 7 minutes to read, bring your own Legos.
  • Muslim Rizvi explains the acronym TECHMEDICS, which collects the basic considerations and questions to ask before beginning an Agile implementation. 8 minutes to read.
  • Mike Cohn shines a light on several “scary” aspects of adopting Agile methods, in honor of Halloween. 6 minutes to read.

Applied Leadership

  • Grace Windsor extols the benefits of using a project team charter to facilitate alignment and put the focus on the goals of the project. 5 minutes to read.
  • Naomi Caietti tutors us on emotional intelligence and how to develop it in ourselves. 5 minutes to read.
  • Susanne Madsen recounts her recovery from the stress she imposed on herself while leading a large, business-critical program. Sometimes, we must lead ourselves. 7 minutes to read.

Stakeholder Engagement

  • Lynda Bourne describes a complex model of stakeholder engagement, with the authentic characteristics of the organization at the core. 6 minutes to read.
  • Mike Clayton tells us how to plan a stakeholder engagement campaign. 8 minutes to read.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Nicole Nader on why being authentic is important to building effective relationships with stakeholders. Podcast, 16 minutes, safe for work.

Working and the Workplace

  • Tamás Török shares the findings on hiring software developers at start-up companies, from the State of Software Development 2017 report. 4 minutes to read.
  • Gary Poster conducts a rigorous analysis of the pros and cons of distributed teams, from “remote friendly” to “remote reliant.” 6 minutes to read.
  • Lisette Sutherland interviews Dom Price, head of R&D at Atlassian, on best practices for including remote colleagues in teams, such as team rituals. Video interview, 41 minutes.
  • Mike Griffiths reminds of the importance of focus. Just over a minute to read.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of October 9 – 15

New project management articles published on the web during the week of October 9 – 15. And this week’s video: Caitria and Morgan O’Neill explain how they became disaster recovery project managers on the day their hometown (including their home) was hit by a tornado. 9 minutes, safe for work. #MillennialsSteppingUp

Must read!

  • Ben Evans does a generational study of dominant tech firms and finds that GAFA (Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon) are 3X the scale of Wintel. 5 minutes to read.
  • Eshe Nelson summarizes the work of Nobel Prize winner Richard Thaler, who examines the flaws and biases in human nature that drive us to make bad decisions. 5 minutes to read.
  • Nir Eyal and Lakshmi Mani focus on confirmation bias—how it works inside your brain, and how to deal with it when trying to function in the real world. 5 minutes to read.

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews Jonathan Clay, PMI UK’s incoming president on the upcoming Synergy conference and what’s next for the chapter. 5 minutes to read.
  • Mike Clayton answers the rhetorical question: should I get a project management qualification? 10 minutes to read, 7 outbound links.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy tutors us on project quality assurance. 6 minutes to read.
  • Kiron Bondale suggests that, in addition to defining project success factors, we should define what would constitute a project failure.
  • Kerry Wills lists five guiding principles for an agile portfolio. 2 minutes to read.
  • Harry Hall lists seven project management influencers to watch. Thanks for including me in such esteemed company! 3 minutes to read.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of all things Agile, from scaling Spotify to uncontrollable technical debt to cost of delay. 3 minutes to scan, 9 outbound links.
  • John Yorke’s new Kanban training board game is almost ready for general distribution, but he’s looking for feedback. Seems really interesting. 3 minutes to read.
  • Johanna Rothman explores minimalism—how little can we do and yet still be effective? Just over a minute to read.
  • Shane Billings articulates the type of “deviations” needed to adapt a plan (connect the moving dots) in a fast-changing environment.
  • Jesse Fewell calls out the haters—“Hate is not an Agile value.” Attack the problem, not the person. 4 minutes to read the text, 5 minutes for the podcast. Safe for work.
  • Eli Woolery and Aarron Walter interview Jake Knapp, father of the design sprint and author of Sprint. 2 minutes to read the article, 57 minutes for the podcast.

Applied Leadership

  • John Goodpasture notes that any activity at scale requires strangers to work together effectively. Which requires things like currency, bureaucracy, and the rule of law. 2 minutes to read.
  • Art Petty maps out the distinctions between a team and a group. Yes, groups are useful, too. 4 minutes to read.
  • Kat Boogaard shares some legitimate tactics for becoming a thought leader. Yes, thought leaders are leaders. 3 minutes to read.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Ryan Ogilvie gives us a detailed plan for improving business support. 7 minutes to read.
  • The Nuvro blog has a new article on how to create a customer success team. 5 minutes to read.
  • Vaibhav Aparimit begins a series on the fundamentals of system design with definitions of reliability more accurately resilience), scalability, and maintainability. 2 minutes to read.
  • Karik Patel explains augmented analytics and tells us why it matters. 3 minutes to read.

Working and the Workplace

  • Michael Lopp describes that moment when the Old Guard and the New Guard actually come together for the first time—in a moment of crisis. 5 minutes to read.
  • Suzanne Lucas explains how to keep working when you’re depressed (and shares some insights into managing depressed people). 5 minutes to read.
  • Seth Godin: “Sonderis defined as that moment when you realize that everyone around you has an internal life as rich and as conflicted as yours.” 1 minute to read.

Enjoy!