New PM Articles for the Week of August 22 – 28

New project management articles published on the web during the week of August 22 – 28. And this week’s video: the late designer Bill Moggridge explains interaction design, one of the concepts used to design application software for the first laptop computer, the GRiD Compass. John Ellenby, who founded GRiD Systems in 1979, passed away this week. I was proud to work in GRiD’s federal systems division back in the 1980’s.

Must read!

  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews Ellen Maynes, 2016 Global Peace Fellow and project management educator. Attention, Dos Equis: Ellen is The Most Interesting Woman in the World.
  • Mike Cohn explains story points as an estimating tool, taking into account the amount of work to do, complexity, and uncertainty or risk. An excellent, thorough explanation!
  • John Goodpasture shows how game theory can be applied to external threats. Remember: your SWOT analysis is just the beginning.

Established Methods

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Lindsay Scott on the Arras People Project Management Benchmark Report 2016. An interesting analysis by the recruiters – just 31 minutes, safe for work.
  • Deanne Earle reflects on the Arras People Project Management Benchmark Report 2016. Why can’t organizations find the talent that they need?
  • Bertrand Duperrin describes the pros and cons of the Fourth Industrial Revolution – end-to-end digitization and integration of partners into the value chain.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy recommends five project management blogs that you should follow (including this one).
  • Amber Lee Dennis presents a primer on Data Lakes.
  • Shuba Kathikeyan shares two excellent infographics: the impact of poor software quality in business and a set of data center industry statistics and projections.
  • Pramod Jaiswal presents an infographic on developing a practical IT disaster recovery plan.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly Food for Thought list of recommended Agile posts, articles, and so on.
  • Mike Griffiths describes some of the ways you can incorporate risk management into Agile methods.
  • Ryan Ripley interviews Agile coach Don Gray in a wide-ranging conversation that covers Agile transformation, models, and sources of insights. Just 40 minutes, safe for work.
  • Bart Gerardi debunks the notion that Agile is a way to eliminate a layer of management.
  • Belle B. Cooper explains the idea behind a personal hackathon, and uses Brian Nelson’s recent experience as source material.
  • Sam Sinha shares his tips for grooming the backlog.

Applied Leadership

  • Coert Visser recaps research into when positive feedback is more motivational, and when negative feedback moves us more.
  • Michael Lopp has just published the third edition of Managing Humans, in paperback and Kindle editions.
  • Bruce Harpham shares recommendations on twelve books for your reading table (or Kindle).
  • Peter Landau recommends another sixteen leadership and management books. Fortunately, there’s still nothing good on TV.

Working and the Workplace

  • Garland Coulson wants us to plan our day to accommodate those “low energy” periods, by scheduling the right tasks.
  • Harry Hall also recommends that we need to manage our energy, not just our time.
  • Brendan Toner reviews the best new Getting Things Done features of Zendone 2.0. Did you know they now have both iOS and Android apps?
  • Suzanne Lucas tells how five well-known companies help their employees work from home.
  • Lisette Sutherland answers an interesting question: how does a virtual team celebrate together? Just 7 minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of June 27 – July 3

New project management articles published on the web during the week of June 27 – July 3. And this week’s video: Australian software project manager Adrian Fittolani’s TEDx talk at Deakin University on why being more selective about your TV watching might be the key to both achieving your goals and feeling more relaxed. Yes, it’s a video – but you can choose whether to watch it.

Must read!

  • Louis Columbus reports on the ways machine learning is impacting manufacturing, from production capacity and waste reduction to manufacturing-as-a-service.
  • Lynda Bourne notes some lessons learned on selling change, in the context of Brexit. “It helps if they are unhappy with the status quo.”
  • Chris Middleton speculates on the impact of Brexit on data protection, data transfer, and privacy. These issues will matter to IT project managers in almost every country.

Established Methods

  • Maria Nordberg interviews David Hillson, the Risk Doctor, on how uncertainties in work and project should be handled. Just 17 minutes, safe for work.
  • John Goodpasture opines that the first question of risk management should be, “Where does the slack go?”
  • Matthew Squair looks at the ramifications of the first fatality attributed to Tesla’s autopilot, while humming an old song by The Doors.
  • Nick Pisoni points out the limitations of earned value management, especially in managing contracts and risks.
  • Elizabeth Harrin has some recommendations for getting benefits from new tools brought in by team members without getting bogged down in tech adoption.
  • Beth Spriggs notes that a large project has to overcome more inertia than a small one, and describes a process to get things moving.
  • Ryan Ogilvie looks at the strategic considerations that must be addressed by a knowledge management solution.

Agile Methods

  • Johanna Rothman concludes her series on product owners and learning with parts 4 and 5.
  • Siddalingesh Zalaki shares a product owner’s view of story maturity, and how to achieve it.
  • The Clever PM describes several indicators of an Agile culture.
  • Ryan Ripley interviews Christopher Avery on the responsibility process. Just 16 minutes, safe for work.
  • Mike Griffiths has prepared a mind map for those preparing for the PMI-ACP exam.

Applied Leadership

  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy has posted the ultimate guide to effective team meetings.
  • Mike Clayton lists a few attributes of a good project manager.
  • Susanne Madsen points out the most common communication mistakes.
  • Joe Curcillo explains a team-building acronym: GLUE.
  • Stuart Easton sees the Brexit vote as a sign of the failure to build a consensus on the meaning of the leadership’s vision for the organization.

Working and the Workplace

  • Art Petty invokes W. Edwards Deming and Frank Herbert in identifying two types of fear and how to neutralize them.
  • Bertrand Duperrin reviews “The Digital Renaissance of Work: Delivering Digital Workplaces Fit for the Future,” by Paul Miller and Elizabeth Marsh.
  • Lisette Sutherland tells how to combat loneliness as a remote worker. Just 9 minutes, safe for work.
  • Bruce Harpham lists 30(!) resources to help grow your network and your career.
  • Peter Saddington shares a list of ten things that require zero talent, but make all the difference.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of June 6 – 12

New project management articles published on the web during the week of June 6 – 12. And this week’s video: Ed Deci’s TED Talk on controlled motivation and autonomous motivation. Ed is the co-developer of the self-determination theory, which suggests that we should create conditions under which people can motivate themselves. Just 14 minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Johanna Rothman presents the case for and against estimates, in parts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. This series should be sufficient justification for you to follow her blogs.
  • Nick Statt reports on Microsoft’s new project management app for Office 365, called Planner. Not a replacement for Project, but a collaboration and planning tool.
  • Brad Egeland provides one-page summaries for twelve project management, collaboration, and portfolio management software products.

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin collected insights from six PM’s on how they manage multiple simultaneous projects.
  • Pat Weaver looks into those cases where the critical path includes task dependencies other than Finish-to-Start links.
  • Clark Wimberly notes that proper preparation is required for a kick-off meeting which will pay dividends throughout the project.
  • Henny Portman reviews “PPM! Manage Your Organization Masterfully with Project portfolio Management.”
  • Cameron Conaway interviews Robin Kwong, Special Projects Editor at the Financial Times, who find clarity by beginning each project with the same question: What’s it for?
  • Kenneth Ashe explains how to create and use an Issues Log.
  • Rob England proposed two deliberately conflicting principles to guide a DevOps transformation, in order to create a dynamic tension. Which is how the world works, right?

Agile Methods

  • Dave Prior notes the untimely passing of Agile leading light Jean Tabaka by pulling two interviews from his archives. A total of 42 minutes, safe for work. She will be sorely missed.
  • Saumya Nigam explains estimation using story points.
  • Faisal Ansari uses the INVEST model to determine whether backlog items are well written, as the first step in splitting them into smaller stories.
  • Emanuele Passera continues his introduction to Kanban series with part 2.
  • Tom McFarlin considers Reid Hoffman’s quote, “If you’re not embarrassed by the first version of your product, then you’ve launched too late.”
  • Tami Flowers describes using Lean/ Agile methods to establish a data governance organization framework.
  • Bob Tarne explains the concept of “ready ready.” It’s where you need to begin in order to get to “done done.” You can say that again …

Applied Leadership

  • Suresh MK uses events from the life of Nelson Mandela to illustrate John Kotter’s eight-stage process of creating major change.
  • Kathleen O’Connor interviews Bart Engal on his book, “Leading Through Language: choosing Words that Influence and Inspire.”
  • Lysette Sutherland interviews Dave Hecker on effectively managing geographically distributed software development teams. Just 35 minutes, safe for work.
  • Elise Stevens interviews Gillian Klette on what to do when your project team hates each other. Just 18 minutes, safe for work.

Pot Pouri

  • David Manheim looks at complexity, reification, Goodhart’s Law, and why measurement is hard. So is spelling reification.
  • Travis Bradberry explains why you should work for 52 minutes, then take a break for 17 minutes. Got your timer ready?
  • Abby Wolfe shares an infographic on the high-impact LinkedIn profile updates you should make when job-hunting.
  • Seth Godin suggests we talk slowly, because “um” doesn’t add as much value as silence.

Enjoy!