New PM Articles for the Week of January 5 – 11

SightseersNew project management articles published on the web during the week of January 5 – 11. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

Must read!

  • Maree Harris tells us how to be a coach, rather than a critic.
  • Amy Webb identifies the technology trends we can’t ignore in 2015.
  • Igal Hauer breaks down the actions that you should take to get your project team communicating and collaborating.

PM Best Practices

  • Steven Levy continues his series of posts on how to become the “five tools project manager,” explaining how to manage the Conditions of Satisfaction.
  • Michael Wood explains why program management is more than just managing a portfolio of related projects.
  • Glen Alleman gives us a quick recap of how our techniques for decision making in the presence of uncertainty have evolved, and how estimating is key to modern processes.
  • Johanna Rothman explains why the “indispensable employee” is a problem for the team, for management, and for the indispensable employee.
  • Lynda Bourne gives us a quick overview of the relationship between ethics, culture, rules, and governance.
  • Steve Jones explores a hypothetical: a person in a trusted role, who has started doing things differently (but not out of role), being detected by security analytics.
  • Terry Czigan reviews Margaret Lee’s new book, “Leading Virtual Project Teams.”
  • Susanne Madsen applies the metaphor of Yin and Yang to leading projects.
  • Margaret Meloni shares a nice graphic that summarizes how much project managers earn around the world.
  • Elizabeth Harrin has identified ten high-value project management conferences for us to consider attending in 2015.

Agile Methods

  • Derek Huether found a new product that lets you implement a green technique: reusable story cards!
  • Kelsey van Haaster gives us a primer on technical debt.
  • John Goodpasture explains why round negotiating tables are Agile.
  • Fang Wan consider the tenuous relationship between work and hours in estimates.
  • Bart Gerardi explains why velocity is not a figure of merit for the team; it is a planning metric, not an efficiency metric.
  • Mike Cohn even uses Scrum concepts to organize his own work. Probably not a daily stand-up, but other concepts map nicely.

Looking Ahead

  • Deven Parekh projects five trends related to Big Data. “Personalized medicine?” The pharmacist as barista – wow …
  • Scott Berkun tries to measure a trend: just how popular is remote work?
  • Don Kim brings together various indicators that predict the growth of the independent project manager, as part of the new normal.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Cesar Abeid interviews Susanne Madsen, on the power of project leadership. Just 56 minutes, safe for work.
  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Brian Irwin on facilitating Agile transformations using the Socratic method. Just 17 minutes, safe for work.
  • Mark Phillipy interviews Joseph Flahiff on his new book, “Being Agile in a Waterfall World.” Just 58 minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of December 29 – January 4

Happy 2015New project management articles published on the web during the week of December 29 – January 4. Wait, it’s 2015? Happy New Year!

PM Best Practices

  • Glen Alleman elegantly explains why a project needs both a budget and on-going estimates of cost to complete, in order to be in control.
  • John Goodpasture breaks down the “big three” of portfolio management – sequence, value, and risk – as the essence of planning to maximize value.
  • Bruce Benson parallels personal financial planning assumptions with the assumptions we use in planning our projects.
  • Adriana Girdler has some thoughts on how to sustain that new change initiative.
  • Gina Abudi explains how a team-building exercise works, when your team is spread across the globe.
  • Harry Hall builds on his recent post about asking the right questions, with some examples of what, why, and how.
  • Russell Whitworth urges us to distinguish between the essential and the merely important.
  • Lynda Bourne provides a few techniques for fine-tuning your bullshit detector. Yup, she even has a no-bullshit road sign, which I envy to no end.
  • Kenneth Darter coaches us on how to communicate changes on our project.
  • Soma Bhattacharya interviews Elizabeth Harrin about her new e-coaching service.

Agile Methods

  • Pawel Brodzinski proposes an alternative to Minimum Viable Product: he calls it Minimum Indispensable Feature Set.
  • Don Kim predicts that 2015 will see us using the term “Agile” less frequently, as Agile methods become the norm.
  • Terry Bunio notes the resemblance between the Agile Movement, which is now in its teen years, and actual teenagers. Hilarious …
  • Johanna Rothman shares a recent coaching experience, as a lead-in to the new Influential Agile Leader training that she and Gil Broza will deliver this year.
  • Alex Lu-Pon points out the use of Agile methods in “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1.”
  • Sumit Sharma details the Definition of Ready for a user story.

Looking Ahead

  • Cheri Baker thinks the best part of January 1st is the attitude that we are empowered to make adjustments to our behavior.
  • Michel Dion asks us, what will you stop doing in 2015, in order to have the time to achieve your goals?
  • Elizabeth Harrin lists some specific actions to take at work, in order to get organized for 2015.
  • Andy Jordan looks ahead, with a few concerns about how the project management profession is evolving. But, just a few.
  • Robert Vamosi reports that the Internet of Things is now sneaking into our socks. No, he’s not kidding.
  • Scott Berkun relates how he learned to concentrate with advice in a book from Larry Bird.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of November 17 – 23

Balloon BeyondNew project management articles published on the web during the week of November 17 – 23. We give you a high-level view so you can read what interests you. Recommended:

PM Best Practices

  • Seth Godin considers how the project scope is a bit like a bushel of apples. I guess Forrest Gump already did the “box of chocolates” routine.
  • Adriana Beal explores the Peter Drucker notion that, if you keep doing what made you successful, you will eventually fail.
  • Don Kim explains the relationship between Kaizen, an operations management incremental improvement process, and Kaikaku, a project delivering radical change.
  • Bruce Benson notes that groups get better over time, only by learning from their experience – including the negative experiences.
  • Ron Rosenhead recounts an anecdote that illustrates how stakeholder engagement can lead to real improvements.
  • Nick Pisano points out the pivotal role of the integrated master plan in complex programs and project portfolios.
  • Kenneth Darter shares his checklist for preparing to begin a really big project.
  • Pat Weaver summarizes an article he contributed to, on the topic of governance versus management.
  • Harry Hall recommends an approach to selecting and initiating projects.
  • Elizabeth Harrin reports from the Synergy 2014 conference, summarizing three presentations and some audience participation music-making.
  • Ryan Ogilvie looks at the details of implementing that IT department holiday tradition: the production change freeze.

Agile Methods

  • Pallavi Kelapure and Vikas Gupta detail their approach to applying rapid deployment principles in an ERP implementation.
  • Johanna Rothman offers some practical approaches to breaking your near-epics into smaller stories.
  • Deepak Joshi walks us through a simple example of user role modeling, to show why the technique is so useful.
  • Derek Huether proposes an innovation in backlog grooming: Progression Workshops, using a subset of the team, referred to as the Product Owner Team.

Measuring

  • Glen Alleman provides links to eight resources for methods to estimate non-trivial software projects, based on historical metrics.
  • Mike Cohn disputes the dissing of so-called “vanity metrics.”
  • John Goodpasture explains what a “figure of merit” is, and how it can be useful.
  • Rich Maltzman leverages an old post by Mounir Ajam to show that project success includes things you can’t measure until well after the project is complete.

Podcasts and Videos

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Jack Ferraro on the competencies required to drive strategic initiatives. Just 30 minutes, safe for work.
  • Paul Ritchie contemplates how the way we name our projects influences the way our stakeholders and team feel about them. Just 16 minutes, safe for work.

Human Behavior in Groups

  • Lynda Bourne summarizes the Cohen-Bradford “Influence without Authority” model.
  • Pawel Brodzinski provides a leader’s view of the movement to reduce the role of management, and shares Lunar Logic’s two rules that govern their approach.
  • Peter Saddington notes the holes in the “personality testing” model of candidate selection.
  • Bruce Harpham lists some proactive methods to manage project conflict, and your reactions to it.

Enjoy!