New PM Articles for the Week of January 16 – 22

New project management articles published on the web during the week of January 16 – 22. And this week’s video: Harry Hall shares a few ideas to improve our project cost management approach. Less than four minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Kailash Awati examines the potential for data science to do considerable damage when we ignore social and ethical considerations. Weapons of math destruction, indeed!
  • Art Petty describes the “energy sinks” (the opposite of “source”) that burn us out and lists some actions we can take to turn them off.
  • Jesse Lynn Stoner suggests that humiliation might be a gift – a wake-up call – and quotes Gandhi’s comment on the proverb: the truth hurts.

Established Methods

  • Atif Qureshi curated responses to a request for predictions: what will be the top project management trends in 2017? Of course, he has his own predictions.
  • Leigh Espy shared a simple but complete scope statement template for download. Just name and Email required.
  • Mike Clayton posts a basket full of ideas that have nothing to do with project management that will nevertheless help us be more effective project managers.
  • Samuel Bacharach describes the characteristics of four type of influencers – Top Dogs, Gatekeepers, Gurus, and Players – who can make or break your project.
  • Mike Griffiths introduces a loose series of blog posts on the #NoProjects principle of continuous software development.
  • Kristyn Medeiros waxes poetic on the stoplight colors we use for status reporting.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from Guerrilla Innovation to Kanban metrics to saying no to customers.
  • Craig Brown makes the case for still using Planning Poker, even after you’ve been using Agile methods for a while.
  • Derek Huether created an infographic that enumerates qualities of good and bad ScrumMasters.
  • Madhavi Ledalla sketches the “Art of the Scrum Master.”
  • The Clever PM articulates the challenges of trying to reliably predict the future behavior of your customers.
  • Donna Reed tells about Kaizen, or “change for the better,” and creating a high-maturity Agile culture based on continuous improvement.
  • Yona Gidalevitz describes the application of ethnographic research to UX design for users from a specific culture. There’s more to it than just translating words to their language.

Applied Leadership

  • Elizabeth Harrin reviews Gary Lloyd’s new book, “Business Leadership for IT projects.”
  • Wayne Turmel points out the obvious – of course a project manager is a people manager.
  • Kerry Wills reminds us to set the example: “Act what you expect.”

Technology and Techniques

  • Craig Smith interviews quality consultant Anne-Marie Charrett on context-driven testing, exploratory testing, and women in technology. Just 40 minutes, safe for work.
  • Cade Metz reports on the growing number of high-end physicists finding work in the software teams of Silicon Valley.
  • Jake Rhuede of Red Stag Fulfillment posted an interesting infographic on the ways artificial intelligence is infiltrating E-commerce.

Working and the Workplace

  • Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic and Adam Yearsley point out the types of work where people with high EQ are less effective.
  • Suzanne Lucas considers the case of the employee who refuses to answer (or even read) Emails in the evening.
  • Jennifer Aldrich explains why hiring for culture fit is not antithetical to hiring for diversity.
  • Jack Simpson notes that if you don’t finish what you’re working on, you’re not productive – you’re just busy.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of October 24 – 30

New project management articles published on the web during the week of October 24 – 30. And this week’s video: Garland “Captain Time” Coulson explains how to be more productive by working in a coffee shop. Just eight minutes, safe for work. And yes, I finished this list at a Starbucks under the influence of a triple venti latte.

Must read!

  • Most of the countries in Europe and Asia that observe Daylight Savings Time returned to Standard Time over the weekend (October 30). And the countries in North America will return to Standard Time next weekend (November 6). If you are working across continents, check here to see whose clock shifted.
  • Ron Carucci explains how to integrate strategic thinking into your day to day management activities.
  • Beth Spriggs looks at the cost of indecision, and how to avoid it.

Established Methods

  • John Goodpasture provides the best quote of the week: “Checklists are found between the milestones.”
  • Stuart Easton examines several discredited methods for prioritizing projects in a portfolio that are inexplicably still in wide use.
  • Mary Shacklett recommends an approach for evaluating project management software.
  • Jennifer Lonoff Schiff enumerates a process for achieving IT department goals, using project management tools and mindset.
  • Christopher Cook considers entrepreneurial project management through two philosophical lenses: the western Stoicism and the eastern Taoism. Interesting.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers posts his weekly round-up of Agile articles, blog posts, and other content.
  • Johanna Rothman continues her series on the roles of coaches and managers in Agile transformations.
  • Mike Cohn suggests three new books for your Agile methods reading list.
  • Brian Jones tells how Virginia Tech introduced Scrum to teams with operational responsibilities, to split their time with product development responsibilities.
  • Luis Seabra explains servant leadership, based on Robert K. Greenleaf’s essay “The servant as leader”, published in 1970.
  • The Clever PM wants us to INVEST in our user stories. Yes, it’s a clever acronym – read it anyway.
  • Jutta Eckstein explains the “Sociocratic approach” to management and how to apply it in modern hierarchical organizations.

Applied Leadership

  • Lolly Daskal provides some diagnostics, in case you suspect your emotional intelligence is not up to the task of getting you through your day.
  • Coert Vissar notes that when someone says a topic is boring, there may be some element of performance anxiety involved.
  • Marcel Schwantes lists ten phrases that will help you be perceived as more trustworthy. Of course, you must mean them to be trustworthy.
  • Seth Godin observes how the professional wrestling mindset has infiltrated our politics and out workplaces.

Technology and Techniques

  • Matthew Squair distills the technology and security lessons from this week’s denial-of-service attack by an IoT botnet.
  • Sahil Miglani explains the difference between Small Data and Big Data.
  • Brendan Toner starts a three-part series contrasting hierarchical and flat task lists in personal productivity applications.

Working and the Workplace

  • Suzanne Lucas gets us ready for the return to Standard Time by pointing out that Seasonal Affective Disorder has the potential to impact our health and productivity.
  • Yuki Noguchi reports on the growing evidence that noisy co-workers reduce productivity. The days of cubicle work spaces may be numbered.
  • Belle Cooper suggests we re-think how we spend our leisure time. There’s more to it than just not working. Like blogging …

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of August 22 – 28

New project management articles published on the web during the week of August 22 – 28. And this week’s video: the late designer Bill Moggridge explains interaction design, one of the concepts used to design application software for the first laptop computer, the GRiD Compass. John Ellenby, who founded GRiD Systems in 1979, passed away this week. I was proud to work in GRiD’s federal systems division back in the 1980’s.

Must read!

  • Elizabeth Harrin interviews Ellen Maynes, 2016 Global Peace Fellow and project management educator. Attention, Dos Equis: Ellen is The Most Interesting Woman in the World.
  • Mike Cohn explains story points as an estimating tool, taking into account the amount of work to do, complexity, and uncertainty or risk. An excellent, thorough explanation!
  • John Goodpasture shows how game theory can be applied to external threats. Remember: your SWOT analysis is just the beginning.

Established Methods

  • Cornelius Fichtner interviews Lindsay Scott on the Arras People Project Management Benchmark Report 2016. An interesting analysis by the recruiters – just 31 minutes, safe for work.
  • Deanne Earle reflects on the Arras People Project Management Benchmark Report 2016. Why can’t organizations find the talent that they need?
  • Bertrand Duperrin describes the pros and cons of the Fourth Industrial Revolution – end-to-end digitization and integration of partners into the value chain.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy recommends five project management blogs that you should follow (including this one).
  • Amber Lee Dennis presents a primer on Data Lakes.
  • Shuba Kathikeyan shares two excellent infographics: the impact of poor software quality in business and a set of data center industry statistics and projections.
  • Pramod Jaiswal presents an infographic on developing a practical IT disaster recovery plan.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly Food for Thought list of recommended Agile posts, articles, and so on.
  • Mike Griffiths describes some of the ways you can incorporate risk management into Agile methods.
  • Ryan Ripley interviews Agile coach Don Gray in a wide-ranging conversation that covers Agile transformation, models, and sources of insights. Just 40 minutes, safe for work.
  • Bart Gerardi debunks the notion that Agile is a way to eliminate a layer of management.
  • Belle B. Cooper explains the idea behind a personal hackathon, and uses Brian Nelson’s recent experience as source material.
  • Sam Sinha shares his tips for grooming the backlog.

Applied Leadership

  • Coert Visser recaps research into when positive feedback is more motivational, and when negative feedback moves us more.
  • Michael Lopp has just published the third edition of Managing Humans, in paperback and Kindle editions.
  • Bruce Harpham shares recommendations on twelve books for your reading table (or Kindle).
  • Peter Landau recommends another sixteen leadership and management books. Fortunately, there’s still nothing good on TV.

Working and the Workplace

  • Garland Coulson wants us to plan our day to accommodate those “low energy” periods, by scheduling the right tasks.
  • Harry Hall also recommends that we need to manage our energy, not just our time.
  • Brendan Toner reviews the best new Getting Things Done features of Zendone 2.0. Did you know they now have both iOS and Android apps?
  • Suzanne Lucas tells how five well-known companies help their employees work from home.
  • Lisette Sutherland answers an interesting question: how does a virtual team celebrate together? Just 7 minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!