New PM Articles for the Week of April 10 – 16

New project management articles published on the web during the week of April 3 – 9. And this week’s video: Kerry Goyette tells us that our employees are already motivated—the key to success is unleashing the power of their motivation. Just 17 minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Julie Bort reports on how Jeff Bezos and the Amazon leadership team make risky business decisions. In short: decide quickly, based on the question, “So, what if you’re wrong?”
  • Scott Berkun debunks several common clichés about creativity. Telling people to think outside the box doesn’t change their behavior any more than telling them to jump higher.
  • Tamás Török shares a comprehensive guide to creating user stories, as a vehicle for communicating the value users will find in your app.

Established Methods

  • Elizabeth Harrin lists twenty things that might go into a project plan and provides three templates and a PDF file you can download with the entire list.
  • Geraldine O’Reilly picks up where Elizabeth left off with a list of nine essential project documents, from business case to lessons learned.
  • And Tony Adams anthropomorphizes a group of project management documents to demonstrate why the work breakdown structure is the coolest guy at the bar.
  • PMI announces the formation of a committee to update the Practice Standard for Scheduling. If that’s a special area of expertise, you should consider volunteering.
  • Harry Hall tells us how to “catch” those big project risks by using three straightforward techniques.
  • Elise Steven interviews Naomi Caietti on stakeholder engagement and driving change by becoming a trusted partner.
  • Gina Abudi shares three critical actions needed to engage employees in cross-functional projects.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly roundup of all things Agile, from lipstick Agile, Tragile, and Wagile to distributed Agile and how Jeff Bezos plans to keep Amazon relevant.
  • Jerry Doucett and Valerie Senyk argue for the practice of subversive Scrum in workplaces that haven’t decided to embrace such things.
  • Johanna Rothman does the math to show why team size matters.
  • Mike Cohn points out specific value elements of getting to “done” at the end of a sprint, as opposed to just making progress.
  • Shazir Mucklai makes an excellent case for applying project management processes at startups.
  • John Goodpasture answers a student question about IT project stage gates and Agile methods.

Applied Leadership

  • Art Petty contemplates the critical question: what’s it like to be you? As he says, cognitive diversity is a thing.
  • Suzanne Lucas reports on an April Fool’s joke at Reddit that morphed into a demonstration of the power of those who step up to lead.
  • Angela Chen interviews neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett on the science of emotions, and why we don’t all “feel” the same things.

Technology, Techniques, and Human Behavior

  • Ilan Hertz explains why chatbots will be the next evolutionary step in business analytics. “Why don’t people buy our products, HAL?”
  • Mary Shacklett summarizes five recommendations from Big Data project leaders that might help you avoid the 60% failure rate reported by the Gartner Group.
  • Conner Forrest reports on recent research that found your smartphone fingerprint scanner may be a lot easier to spoof than you might think.

Working and the Workplace

  • Leigh Espy explains why we should look past project management conferences for excellent opportunities to learn, meet interesting people, and develop face-to-face relationships.
  • Jason Dana reports on research which demonstrated that free-flowing job applicant interviews do not predict success and can actually overshadow more valuable information. Watch Kerry’s video above before you read this one!
  • Kara Swisher interviews Code2040 CEO Laura Weidman Powers on moving from diversity to inclusion. Just 48 minutes, safe for work.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of March 20 – 26

New project management articles published on the web during the week of March 20 – 26. And this week’s video: Art Petty tells how to start each day by preparing your attitude. Less than three minutes, safe for work.

Must read (or Hear)!

  • Max Ogles interviews Jane McGonigal, author of Reality is Broken and Superbetter, on the future of habit-forming technology.
  • Ned Johnson thinks the model of the project manager as project CEO might be the reason so many projects become death marches.
  • Darragh Broderick performs a failure analysis on three of the worst decisions of the 20th

Established Methods

  • Pat Weaver makes the point that your project controls—tailored to your delivery strategy—must be both useful and maintainable.
  • Michelle MacAdam tells how to assess whether your project or program is ready to deliver the benefits it was launched to capture.
  • Mike Clayton explains the project checklist in just under three minutes. Safe for work, of course.
  • Dmitriy Nizhebetskiy talks us through the steps in identifying project stakeholders. Just over two minutes, safe for work.
  • Glen Alleman clarifies the math underlying a commonly quoted quality rubric for software project estimates.
  • Jenn Livingston describes the key elements of successfully outsourcing software development.
  • Keith Foote provides a “Cliff’s Notes” history of database management for those who wonder what some of those acronyms mean.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, including Scrum, Lean, risk-taking and experimentation, and even the Seven Day weekend.
  • The Clever PM explains why we need to measure what matters—just say no to vanity metrics.
  • Peter Borsella and Hubert Smits identify the mix of skills needed by cross-functional teams when producing hardware products.
  • Johanna Rothman concludes her series on becoming an Agile Leader.
  • Tamás Török extracts some stunning statistics from The State of Software Development 2017, Startup Edition. Not your corporate software development experience.
  • Mike Cohn introduces yet another installment of his free training videos: this one is on adding just the right amount of detail to user stories.
  • Ryan Ripley interviews author Geoff Watts on his new book, Product Mastery. Just 47 minutes, safe for work.

Applied Leadership

  • Harry Hall makes a case for the caring leader.
  • Alankar Karpe explains why ethics is more important than ever and how to foster an ethical culture in your organization.
  • Henny Portman reviews The Agility Shift: Create Agile and Effective Leaders, Teams, and Organizations.
  • John Goodpasture reflects on a hard question: in your domain, who can say “yes” and make it stick?
  • Gina Abudi continues her case study on getting buy-in for a large project.

Working and the Workplace

  • Michelle Symonds explains a coming development in the UK: a project management apprentice scheme.
  • Alison DeNisco reports on a survey of more than 1,400 US tech workers—48% said that the 2016 election made them care more about diversity and inclusion.
  • Rob England rants about Hot Desks and the dehumanizing policies that remove our team identity and sense of place. We should not be arriving at work early just to get a good seat.

Enjoy!

New PM Articles for the Week of January 16 – 22

New project management articles published on the web during the week of January 16 – 22. And this week’s video: Harry Hall shares a few ideas to improve our project cost management approach. Less than four minutes, safe for work.

Must read!

  • Kailash Awati examines the potential for data science to do considerable damage when we ignore social and ethical considerations. Weapons of math destruction, indeed!
  • Art Petty describes the “energy sinks” (the opposite of “source”) that burn us out and lists some actions we can take to turn them off.
  • Jesse Lynn Stoner suggests that humiliation might be a gift – a wake-up call – and quotes Gandhi’s comment on the proverb: the truth hurts.

Established Methods

  • Atif Qureshi curated responses to a request for predictions: what will be the top project management trends in 2017? Of course, he has his own predictions.
  • Leigh Espy shared a simple but complete scope statement template for download. Just name and Email required.
  • Mike Clayton posts a basket full of ideas that have nothing to do with project management that will nevertheless help us be more effective project managers.
  • Samuel Bacharach describes the characteristics of four type of influencers – Top Dogs, Gatekeepers, Gurus, and Players – who can make or break your project.
  • Mike Griffiths introduces a loose series of blog posts on the #NoProjects principle of continuous software development.
  • Kristyn Medeiros waxes poetic on the stoplight colors we use for status reporting.

Agile Methods

  • Stefan Wolpers curates his weekly list of Agile content, from Guerrilla Innovation to Kanban metrics to saying no to customers.
  • Craig Brown makes the case for still using Planning Poker, even after you’ve been using Agile methods for a while.
  • Derek Huether created an infographic that enumerates qualities of good and bad ScrumMasters.
  • Madhavi Ledalla sketches the “Art of the Scrum Master.”
  • The Clever PM articulates the challenges of trying to reliably predict the future behavior of your customers.
  • Donna Reed tells about Kaizen, or “change for the better,” and creating a high-maturity Agile culture based on continuous improvement.
  • Yona Gidalevitz describes the application of ethnographic research to UX design for users from a specific culture. There’s more to it than just translating words to their language.

Applied Leadership

  • Elizabeth Harrin reviews Gary Lloyd’s new book, “Business Leadership for IT projects.”
  • Wayne Turmel points out the obvious – of course a project manager is a people manager.
  • Kerry Wills reminds us to set the example: “Act what you expect.”

Technology and Techniques

  • Craig Smith interviews quality consultant Anne-Marie Charrett on context-driven testing, exploratory testing, and women in technology. Just 40 minutes, safe for work.
  • Cade Metz reports on the growing number of high-end physicists finding work in the software teams of Silicon Valley.
  • Jake Rhuede of Red Stag Fulfillment posted an interesting infographic on the ways artificial intelligence is infiltrating E-commerce.

Working and the Workplace

  • Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic and Adam Yearsley point out the types of work where people with high EQ are less effective.
  • Suzanne Lucas considers the case of the employee who refuses to answer (or even read) Emails in the evening.
  • Jennifer Aldrich explains why hiring for culture fit is not antithetical to hiring for diversity.
  • Jack Simpson notes that if you don’t finish what you’re working on, you’re not productive – you’re just busy.

Enjoy!